Songwriting: Writing the Lyrics Coursera Quiz Answers

Get All Weeks Songwriting: Writing the Lyrics Coursera Quiz Answers

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Week 2: Songwriting: Writing the Lyrics Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Point of View and The Development Engine

Q1. Point of view does which of the following? Check all that apply.

  • Answers the question, “To whom?”
  • Answers the question, “Who is talking?”
  • Controls the level of intimacy in the song.
  • Establishes the relationship between the singer and the audience.

Q2. Listen to the song, “In Front of the Alamo” (Gary Burr). Which point of view does it use?

  • Second person narrative
  • Third person narrative
  • Direct address
  • First person narrative

Q3. Listen to the song, “What’ll I do?” (Irving Berlin). Which point of view does it use?

  • Third person narrative
  • First person narrative
  • Direct Address
  • Second person narrative

Q4. Listen to the song, “Judgement of the Moon and Stars (Ludwig’s Tune)” (Joni Mitchell). Which point of view does it use?

  • First person narrative
  • Direct address
  • Second person narrative
  • Third person narrative

Q5. Listen to “Eleanor Rigby” (Lennon, McCartney). What is the primary development engine used in this song? (Check all that apply)

  • Point of view
  • Past/Present/Future

Q6. Listen to “One More Dollar” (Gillian Welch). What development engine is used? (Check all that apply)

  • Point of view
  • Past/present/future

Q7. Listen to “Still Crazy After All These Years” (Paul Simon). What development engine is used?

  • Point of view
  • Past/present/future

Q8. Listen to the song, “I Can’t Make You Love Me” (Mike Reid/Allen Shamblin). How many of your six best friends show up in the song? (Check all that apply.)

  • When
  • How
  • Who
  • Where
  • What
  • Why

Q9. Listen to “The Great Pretender” (Buck Ram). What is the song form?

  • Verse Verse Bridge Verse
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus Bridge Chorus
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus

Q10. Listen to “Still Crazy After All These Years” (Paul Simon). What is the song form?

  • Verse Verse Bridge Verse
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus Bridge Chorus

Q11. Listen to “I Can’t Make You Love Me” (Mike Reid/Allen Shamblin). What is the song form?

  • Verse Verse Bridge Verse
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus Bridge Chorus

Q12. Listen to “In Front of the Alamo” (Gary Burr). What is the song form?

  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus Bridge Chorus
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus
  • Verse Verse Bridge Verse

Q13. Listen to “Strawberry Wine” (Matraca Berg/Gary Harrison). What is the song form?

  • Verse Verse Bridge Verse
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus Bridge Chorus
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus

Q14. Listen to “Why Can’t I Have You?” (Ric Ocasek). What is the song form?

  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus
  • Verse Chorus Verse Chorus Bridge Chorus
  • Verse Pre-chorus Chorus Verse Pre-chorus Chorus

Quiz 2: Reflection: Developing an Idea from the Title

Q1. Does your title relate to the ideas in each box and gain more meaning each time? If so, how? If not, how can you edit your ideas to make the title gain weight?

What do you think?

Q2. Does the most important idea (the why of the song) appear in the last box?

  • Yes
  • No

Q3. Does each box contribute to the further development of the title in a clear way? Is it obvious why the song is titled the way it is?

What do you think?

Q4. Is the development of the idea interesting and unique?

What do you think?

Q5. Is the point of view chosen the most effective for the development of the title?

What do you think?

Q6. Is who is talking clearly identified?

  • Yes
  • No

Q7. Is to whom the narrator is speaking clearly identified?

  • Yes
  • No

Q8. Is why clearly identified?

  • Yes
  • No

Q9. Do when and where set an interesting and effective context for the title?

What do you think?

Week 3: Songwriting: Writing the Lyrics Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Stopping and Going

Q1. Which of the following statements is true?

  • Generally, an even number of lines creates stability and an odd number of lines creates instability.
  • Generally, an odd number of lines creates stability and an even number of lines creates instability.

Q2. True or False: The number of lines in a section will create its own feeling, irrespective of what the words say.

  • True
  • False

Q3. In “Some People’s Lives,” is verse 1 stable or unstable?

Some people’s lives

run down like clocks.

One day they stop,

and that’s all they’ve got.

  • Stable
  • Unstable

Q4. In “Some People’s Lives,” is chorus 1 stable or unstable?

Didn’t anybody tell them?

Didn’t anybody see?

Didn’t anybody love them

like you love me?

  • Stable
  • Unstable

Q5. Is the following section stable or unstable? If unstable, does it move forward or create spotlights?

Abiding love and friendship

Sweeter than a song

Helps you get along

  • The section is unstable—it creates spotlights.
  • The section is unstable—it moves forward.
  • The section is stable.

Q6. Is the following section stable or unstable? If unstable, does it move forward or create spotlights?

Abiding love and friendship

Never does you wrong

Helps you get along

Sweeter than a song

  • The section is stable.
  • The section is unstable—it creates spotlights.
  • The section is unstable—it moves forward.

Q7. Is the following section stable or unstable? If unstable, does it move forward or create spotlights?

Abiding love and friendship

Faithful, pure and strong

Helps you get along

Never does you wrong

Sweeter than a song

  • The section is unstable—it moves forward.
  • The section is unstable—it creates spotlights.
  • The section is stable.

Q8. Only in terms of the number of lines, which of these two examples creates a contrast between sections?

Example A

One in your belly button,

Two through your nose

Three through your eyebrows

Four that don’t show

Some beneath your tan line

To give your boyfriend fits

Of course you’ve got the tongue stud

You’re pretty proud of it

Aren’t you afraid of magnets?

Industrial strength magnets?

Do you dream of them at night

Waiting there outside

Humming through the walls

Coming down the halls?

magnets

Aren’t you afraid of magnets?

Example B

One in your belly button,

Two through your nose

Three through your eyebrows

Four that don’t show

Of course you’ve got the tongue stud

To give your boyfriend fits

You’re pretty proud of it

Aren’t you afraid of magnets?

Industrial strength magnets?

Do you dream of them at night

Waiting there outside

Humming through the walls

Coming down the halls?

magnets

Aren’t you afraid of magnets?

  • Example A
  • Example B

Q9. Indicate whether the line lengths are stable or unstable. If unstable, do they move forward or create spotlights?

Maybe we should slow it down

Give these hearts a little time

  • Stable
  • Unstable—create spotlights
  • Unstable—move forward

Q10. Indicate whether the line lengths are stable or unstable. If unstable, do they move forward or create spotlights?

One in your belly button,

Two through your nose

  • Unstable—move forward
  • Stable
  • Unstable—create spotlights

Q11. Does the last line create stability or instability?

Abiding love and friendship

Sweeter than a song

Helps you get along

Get along

  • Stability
  • Instability

Q12. Does the last line create stability or instability?

Abiding love and friendship

Sweeter than a song

Never does you wrong

Helps you get along

  • Stability
  • Instability

Q13. Does the last line create stability or instability?

Abiding love and friendship

Sweeter than a song

Never does you wrong

Stays strong

  • Stability
  • Instability

Q14. Which of these last lines creates additional spotlights? What idea is in the spotlights?

Example 1

Your hand is slightly open

Lifted toward the sky

And I can’t help the feeling

You’re waving a goodbye

Example 2

Your hand is slightly open

Lifted toward the sky

And I can’t help the feeling

That somehow you are waving a goodbye

  • Example 2, spotlight is on “feeling”
  • Example 1, spotlight is on “feeling”
  • Example 2, spotlight is on “goodbye”
  • Example 1, spotlight is on “goodbye”

Q15. Considering only line lengths, which of these sections creates movement into another section? Please select all that apply.

  • Aren’t you afraid of magnets? Do you dream of them at night Waiting there outside your door Lurking?
  • Aren’t you afraid of magnets? Do you dream of them at night Waiting outside your door Humming through the walls?
  • You warm her bottle I’ll change her diapers She’ll be hungry about two or three

Week 4: Songwriting: Writing the Lyrics Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Sonic GPS—Mapping Your Song with Rhyme

Q1. Which re-write of “Amazing Grace” uses an xxaa rhyme scheme?

  • Amazing Grace! How sweet the sound
  • That saved a wretch like me
  • I was lost as I could be
  • Was blind, but now I see
  • Amazing Grace! How sweet the sound
  • I once was lost as I could be
  • I was blind, but now I see
  • My life has gone from lost to found
  • Amazing Grace! how sweet the sound
  • I once was lost, but now I’m not
  • I was blind, but now I see
  • Your love has saved a wretch like me

Q2. Identify the rhyme scheme whereby a represents rhymed syllables and x represents unrhymed syllables. Is the rhyme scheme stable or unstable?

Feel

Tramp

  • a/a, stable
  • x/x, unstable

Q3. Identify the rhyme scheme whereby a represents rhymed syllables and x represents unrhymed syllables. Is this stable or unstable?

Steal

Squeal

Deal

  • x/a/a, unstable
  • a/a/x, unstable
  • a/a/a, unstable
  • a/x/a, unstable

Q4. Identify the rhyme scheme whereby a and b represent rhymed syllables and x represents unrhymed syllables. Is the rhyme scheme stable or unstable?

Damp

Feel

Squeal

Tramp

  • a/x/a/x, unstable
  • a/b/a/b, stable
  • a/a/b/b, stable
  • a/b/b/a, unstable

Q5. Identify the rhyme scheme whereby a and b represent rhymed syllables and x represents unrhymed syllables. Is the rhyme scheme stable or unstable?

Damp

Tramp

Ramp

Steal

  • x/a/a/a, unstable
  • x/a/x/a, stable
  • a/a/a/x, unstable
  • a/x/a/x, unstable

Q6. Identify the following rhyme types as perfect or family rhyme.

  • Filling
  • Spilling
  • Perfect
  • Family

Q7. Identify the following rhyme types as perfect or family rhyme.

  • Coconut
  • Thunderstruck
  • Perfect
  • Family

Q8. Which of the following words are a perfect rhyme with the word CRAFT? (Select all that apply)

  • Smack
  • Raft
  • Track
  • Laughed

Q9. Which of the following words are a family rhyme with the word STONE? (Select all that apply)

  • Known
  • Home
  • Roam
  • Clone

Q10. Which of the following rhymes are additive? (Select all that apply)

  • Lonely; Phony
  • Release; Fleeced
  • Fell; Well
  • Plea; Seize

Q11. Which of the following rhymes are subtractive? (Select all that apply)

  • Learn; Stir
  • Quench; Stench
  • Well; Fell
  • Lonely; Phony

Q12. Which of the following are assonance rhymes? (Select all that apply)

  • Unfailing; Remaining
  • Bleed; Lean
  • Feud; Shoot
  • Crave; Safe
  • Penny; Steady

Q13. Which of the following are consonance rhymes? (Select all that apply)

  • Stellar; Taller
  • Thread; Road
  • Stately; Comfort
  • Ammunition; Fashion
  • Fire; Tower

Q14. Identify the rhyme type: perfect, family, additive, subtractive, assonance, or consonance. Does the rhyme type create a feeling of stability or instability?

Flushed

Stuffed

  • Family, stability
  • Perfect, instability
  • Consonance, instability
  • Assonance, instability

Q15. Identify the rhyme types: perfect, family, additive, subtractive, assonance, or consonance. Do the rhyme types, in the order they appear, create stability or instability?

Class

Roll

Tracks

Throat

  • Class/tracks is additive
  • Roll/throat is assonance
  • Rhyme types create instability
  • Class/tracks is subtractive
  • Roll/throat is perfect
  • Rhyme types create instability
  • Class/tracks is perfect
  • Roll/throat is perfect
  • Rhyme types create stability

Week 5: Songwriting: Writing the Lyrics Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Making It Move

Q1. What is the stressed syllable in the word tempting?

  • tempt
  • ing

Q2. What is the stressed syllable in the word suspect (verb)?

  • sus
  • pect

Q3. What are the stressed syllables in the word appreciation? Please check all that apply.

  • ap
  • pre
  • ci
  • a
  • tion

Q4. What are the primary and secondary stresses in the word illuminate?

  • lu is primary and nate is secondary
  • nate is primary and lu is secondary

Q5. What are the primary and secondary stresses in the word appreciation?

  • pre is primary and a is secondary
  • a is primary and pre is secondary

Q6. What are the primary and secondary stresses in the word paparazzi?

  • raz is primary and pa is secondary
  • pa is primary and raz is secondary

Q7. What are the primary and secondary stresses in the word egomaniac?

  • e and ac are primary and ma is secondary
  • ma is primary and e and ac are secondary
  • Q8. What are the primary and secondary stresses in the word moonlight?
  • light is primary and moon is secondary
  • moon is primary and light is secondary

Q9. What is the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables for the following lyric?

/ denotes a stressed syllable

  • denotes an unstressed syllable

“Four friends laughing and dancing in the park”

  • – / – – / – – / /
  • / – / – – – – – – /
  • / / / – – / – – – /
  • / / – – – / – – – /

Q10. What is the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables for the following lyric?

/ denotes a stressed syllable

  • denotes an unstressed syllable

“The ones you couldn’t move”

  • / – – / –
  • – / – – /
  • / – / – /
  • / – / – / –

Q11. What is the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables for the following lyric?

/ denotes a stressed syllable

  • denotes an unstressed syllable

“You make your way between the cracks”

  • / – – – / / /
  • / – / – / – / –
  • / – / – / – /
  • / – – – / – – /

Q12. What is the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables for the following lyric?

/ denotes a stressed syllable

  • denotes an unstressed syllable

“I understand”

  • / – /
  • / – – /
  • // – /

Q13. What is the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables for the following lyric?

/ denotes a stressed syllable

  • denotes an unstressed syllable

“One for your belly button

Two through your nose”

/ / – / – / –

  • / – / /
  • / – / – – / –
  • / – – –
  • / – – – – / –
  • – – /
  • / – – / – / –
  • / – – /

Q14. What are the stressed beats in this example? Please check all that apply.

Click here to listen to the example.

  • measure 1: note 1
  • measure 2: note 2
  • measure 2: note 1
  • measure 3: note 1

Q15. What are the stressed beats in this example? Please check all that apply.

Click here to listen to the example.

  • measure 1: note 1
  • measure 3: note 1
  • measure 2: note 2
  • measure 2: note 4
  • measure 1: note 2
  • measure 2: note 1
  • measure 2: note 3
Conclusion:

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