Agile Project Management Coursera Quiz Answers – Networking Funda

All Weeks Agile Project Management Coursera Quiz Answers

This is the fifth course in the Google Project Management Certificate program. This course will explore the history, approach, and philosophy of Agile project management, including the Scrum framework. You will learn how to differentiate and blend Agile and other project management approaches.

Finally, you will learn how to search for and land opportunities in Agile roles. Current Google project managers will continue to instruct and provide you with the hands-on approaches, tools, and resources to meet your goals.

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Agile Project Management Week 1 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Test your knowledge: The Agile approach

Q1. What is a deliverable?

  • Any communications sent from one party to another during a project
  • A tangible outcome from a project that provides customer value
  • The tasks produced during a project
  • The team feedback gathered during a project

Q2. What is the difference between Agile and Waterfall project management approaches? Select all that apply.

  • Waterfall is more flexible than Agile, as it accounts for changes in stakeholders’ needs as the project progresses.
  • Agile is a less linear approach than Waterfall.
  • Waterfall aims for predictability and tries to avoid change, while Agile embraces the reality that the world is uncertain and unpredictable.
  • Agile and Waterfall approaches are the same. There are no major differences between the two.

Q3. When it comes to deliverables, what are the differences between Waterfall and Agile? Select all that apply.

  • Agile and Waterfall project deliverable releases follow a comparable schedule.
  • Agile projects have one major release, at the end of the project.
  • Waterfall project deliverable releases are often at the end of the project.
  • Agile project deliverable releases are smaller and more frequent throughout the project.

Q4. What are the benefits of Agile projects? Select all that apply.

  • They embrace the reality that the world, markets, and users are uncertain and unpredictable.
  • They help the customer realize—and receive—the product they really wanted.
  • They seek out ways to work more efficiently by streamlining processes without losing value.
  • They deliver one product release at the end of the project, which helps save time and energy.

Quiz 2: Test your knowledge: The Agile Manifesto

Q1. Which of the following statements best describe the Agile Manifesto? Select all that apply.

  • The Manifesto lays out a software development process that is flexible and focuses on people.
  • The Manifesto establishes a new approach that proves the Waterfall model wrong.
  • The Manifesto captures Agile’s values and reinforcing principles to support Agile project management planning and processes.
  • The Manifesto helps project managers and stakeholders focus on end products and deliverables rather than on users.

Q2. Fill in the blank: The Agile Manifesto emphasizes _____ over processes and tools.

  • feedback and procedures
  • flexibility and communication
  • communication and feedback
  • individuals and interactions

Q3. How many values and principles make up the Agile Manifesto?

  • 5 values, 14 principles
  • 4 values, 12 principles
  • 4 values, 14 principles
  • 14 values, 10 principles

Q4. Which of the following projects are best suited to an Agile approach? Select all that apply.

  • Projects that are complex and fast-paced
  • Projects with a set design and goals that are unlikely to change
  • Projects that are susceptible to change or uncertainty
  • Projects with clear client expectations that face minimal uncertainty

Q5. Fill in the blank: VUCA is an acronym that stands for volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and _____.

  • ambiguity
  • alternatives
  • adaptability
  • assumptions

Quiz 3: Test your knowledge: Agile frameworks

Q1. Which of the following statements about Scrum are true? Select all that apply.

  • Scrum refers to a specific Agile framework that features teams working closely together to get the project across the finish line, like players in a rugby match.
  • Scrum is an acronym for the processes that make up the Agile methodology.
  • Scrum refers to a football team’s protective equipment.
  • Scrum gets its name from a formation in rugby where all of the players lean forward, lock their heads together, and get possession of the ball so they can gain precious yards and score.

Q2. What are some takeaways from the Spotify example? Select all that apply.

  • Copy others’ models exactly.
  • Never stop improving.
  • Adapt based on your team’s goals.
  • Don’t be afraid of trial and error.

Q3. What are the roles within a Scrum Team? Select all that apply.

  • Product Owner
  • Development Team
  • Project Manager
  • Scrum Master

Q4. Which Agile methodology provides transparent visual feedback to everyone who might be interested in the status of work in progress?

  • Kanban
  • Scrum
  • Extreme Programming (XP)
  • Lean

Agile Project Management Weekly Challenge 01 Answers

Q1. Agile project management works well with projects that take an iterative approach. What does this mean? Select all that apply.

  • Project deliverables improve continuously based on feedback
  • Project processes are repeated many times during the life cycle of the project
  • The project will take longer to complete
  • The team operates within many short blocks of time

Q2. You are managing a project and your customer does not know which features they want in the end product. How can Agile help solve your customer’s problem? Select all that apply.

  • Agile helps your team frequently and quickly get customer feedback. This enables you to make changes as needed and give your customer the product they really want.
  • Agile enables you to produce more than one version of the product. Then, the customer can decide which one they prefer.
  • Agile helps you create a product requirements document, formally-approved project plans, and a change control board, with the aim of protecting the team from building something that the customer doesn’t want and minimizing any changes.
  • Agile acknowledges the fact that things change and is designed to embrace these changes as your project progresses.

Q3. As an Agile project manager, why is it important to value customer collaboration over contract negotiation? Select all that apply.

  • It allows the freedom to collaborate with customers early and often.
  • It reinforces that customer satisfaction is the highest priority when building a high quality and valuable product.
  • It saves your organization time and money.
  • It encourages your team to seek out every opportunity to include the customer or stakeholder during project execution.

Q4. What does the Agile Manifesto mean by value delivery? Select all that apply.

  • Save clients as much money as possible
  • Deliver highly valuable products to customers
  • Simplify and maximize the amount of work not done
  • Deliver products quickly and frequently

Q5. What does VUCA stand for?

  • Veracity, uncertainty, collaboration, and accountability
  • Volatility, upheaval, collaboration, and ambiguity
  • Volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity
  • Volume, uncertainty, complexity, and accuracy

Q6. How can the VUCA concept help you decide to use Agile or Waterfall? Select all that apply.

  • It helps determine how complex your project is.
  • It helps determine if your project is too ambiguous for the Waterfall method.
  • It helps determine whether your project is too volatile for the Waterfall method.
  • It helps determine if your project needs more predictive stability than the Waterfall method provides.

Q7. Where does Scrum get its name? Select all that apply.

  • Scrum is an acronym for the processes that make up the Agile methodology.
  • Scrum refers to a formation in rugby where players huddle closely together with their heads down while trying to gain possession of the ball.
  • The purpose of the rugby scrum is for each player on the team to play their role in order to work together and achieve their shared goal.
  • Scrum refers to a football team’s huddle.

Q8. What are the four basic activities performed during the product development process of the XP method?

  • Planning, collaborating, testing, and designing
  • Designing, coding, testing, and listening
  • Designing, collaborating, testing, and summarizing
  • Planning, coding, summarizing, and developing

Q9. Fill in the blank: To get the full benefits from Agile, you must adopt not only its processes, but also its _____.

  • mindset
  • terminology
  • software
  • platform

Q10. As a Waterfall project manager, your goal is to minimize any changes that could lead to scope creep. You want to protect your team from building something the client or stakeholders don’t want. What formal and rigorous process could you set up to safeguard against this?

  • Formal communication freeze
  • Daily stakeholder meetings
  • Change Control Board
  • Kanban board

Agile Project Management Week 2 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Test your knowledge: Scrum roles

Q1. What is the primary role of the Development Team, also known as Developers?

  • Build the product
  • Ensure the team is building the right product
  • Maximize the value of the product delivered by the team
  • Help the team understand why their work matters

Q2. What are the primary responsibilities of a Product Owner? Select all that apply.

  • Coaches the Scrum Team
  • Makes sure the product or service fulfills the customer’s needs
  • Ensures the Product Backlog is visible and transparent to all
  • Prioritizes the Product Backlog to optimize delivery and value to customers

Q3. What is the primary role of the Scrum Master?

  • They promote and support the Scrum process by helping everyone understand and implement Scrum.
  • They work to continuously maximize the value of the product delivered by the Scrum Team.
  • They ensure the team is building the right product.
  • They do the work to build the product.

Q4.  you are a Scrum Master coaching Developers to embrace the traits of an effective Development Team: being cross-functional, self-organizing, and supportive. Which additional trait should effective Development Teams display?

  • They should be customer-oriented.
  • They should work as individuals rather than as a team.
  • They should share expertise in the same discipline.
  • They should operate independently, without direct oversight from the Product Owner.

Agile Project Management Weekly Challenge 02 Answers

Q1. In the three pillars of Scrum, what does transparency mean? Select all that apply.

  • Only team members who deal with vendors or stakeholders must be transparent.
  • Teams must be upfront and open with all stakeholders, including team members, customers, sponsors, and management.
  • Everyone on the team must be transparent in order to avoid mixed signals, breakdowns of communication, and unnecessary complications.
  • Teams must make the most significant aspects of their work visible to those responsible for the outcome.

Q2. Fill in the blank: A Scrum Team should be _____, which means people with different skill sets in the organization work together to complete the project successfully.

  • self-disciplined
  • decisive
  • cross-functional
  • organized

Q3. Fill in the blank: In Scrum, the _____ often assumes the role of the Scrum Master.

  • Development Team Member
  • Stakeholder
  • Product Owner
  • project manager

Q4. What are a Product Owner’s responsibilities? Select all that apply.

  • Clearly communicate and prioritize the Product Backlog
  • Facilitate Scrum events such as the Sprint Planning and Retrospective
  • Help the team understand the overall goal and mission of the project
  • Make sure the product fulfills the customers’ needs

Q5. What are some key skills a successful Scrum Master should have? Select all that apply.

  • Communication
  • Coaching
  • Leadership
  • Budgeting

Q6. What is the optimal size of a Development Team?

  • 11 to 15 people
  • 5 to 20 people
  • 1 to 3 people
  • 3 to 9 people

Q7. Who on the Scrum Team is responsible for meeting customers’ needs and prioritizing the Product Backlog?

  • Development Team
  • Scrum Master
  • Project Manager
  • Product Owner

Q8. Scrum Teams behave according to what core values? Select all that apply.

  • Focus
  • Respect
  • Dissension
  • Openness
  • Commitment

Q9. As a new project begins, the Scrum Team creates processes and structures they believe will help them efficiently complete the project. While they are open to ideas, the team doesn’t want to rely on outside processes to get the work done. Which Development Team trait does this represent?

  • Customer-oriented
  • Self-organizing
  • Cross-functional
  • Cross-organizing

Q10. What is one responsibility of both a Product Owner and a project manager?

  • Product Backlog management
  • Stakeholder management
  • Timebox management
  • Team performance management

Agile Project Management Week 3 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Test your knowledge: The Product Backlog

Q1. Which Scrum Role is primarily responsible for owning and updating the Product Backlog?

  • Development Team
  • Scrum Master
  • Product Owner
  • High-Influence Stakeholder

Q2. Which of the following are key characteristics of a Product Backlog? Select all that apply.

  • It is a living artifact.
  • It is owned and adjusted by the entire team.
  • It is a prioritized list of features.
  • It is rarely updated.

Q3. What long-term objective for the Scrum Team is included in the Product Backlog?

  • Sprint Goal
  • Product requirements document
  • Product Owner
  • Product Goal

Q4. When building a Product Backlog, you include how much effort the Developers state it will take to finish an item. You should capture this information in which Backlog item attribute?

  • Item description
  • Item estimate
  • Item value field
  • Item order

Q5. When building a Product Backlog, you compare the importance of each Backlog item to the other Backlog items. This helps you rank and organize the Backlog items from highest to lowest priority. You should capture this information in which Backlog item attribute?

  • Item description
  • Item effort estimate
  • Item order
  • Item value

Quiz 2: Activity: Create a Product Backlog

Q1. To pass this graded quiz, you must receive at least 80%, or 4 out of 5 points, by completing the activity and answering corresponding quiz questions. You can learn about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will write user stories and create acceptance criteria for each story based on customer needs. These user stories, collected under one epic, will form the basis of a Product Backlog.

Note: Throughout this course, you will complete tasks normally done by others (like the Development Team or Product Owner). Even if you don’t perform them yourself, it is important that you understand these processes. 

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step instructions.

Imagine you are overseeing the development and launch of Virtual Verde, Office Green’s new product line. Virtual Verde’s mission is to make working from home more enjoyable by offering desk plants for home office use. New customers recently received the first batch of plants.

As a next step, your team had planned to introduce new product offerings to the Virtual Verde catalog—starting with Bonsai trees. However, a customer survey discovered that 70% of the new customers had difficulty caring for their plants. Many of the plants wilted and died within a month. This information inspired the team to develop new offerings and companion products to help new owners care for their plants.

From the survey, Office Green learned that they can create value for their customers by making it easy to:

  • Find out which plants are easiest to care for
  • Access care instructions easily
  • Have the right tools to care for their plants
  • Remember when to water their plants
  • Get expert help and advice quickly
  • Have a hassle-free way to return their orders

You will work with your team to create user stories that will help them build solutions to address these customer needs, and add them to the Product Backlog. Your team has already added Bonsai tree user stories to the Backlog, but the new plant care stories have now become the top priority.

Note: In general, the Product Owner leads in prioritizing the Backlog and addressing new concerns. Anyone can work on user stories, but the Development Team typically gives feedback on them.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Product Backlog

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below. Activity Template_ Product BacklogXLSX FileDownload file

Step 2: Create six user stories

Using the Bonsai tree stories in the Backlog template as a model, create six new user stories—one to address each of the six customer needs from the scenario. Your user stories should follow this construction:

As a <user role>, I want <this action> so that I can <get this value>. 

For the <user role> part of each story, consider what sort of person might have that specific customer need. They might be a potential customer, a new plant owner, or something else. Keep in mind that these stories should help customers who may not have much experience caring for plants.

For the <action> part of each user story, fill in the specific customer need. 

For the <value> part of each story, think about why your user might want to perform that particular action and how it will help them.

When completed, each story should express a customer need the team can work to fulfill. For example, imagine that a customer wants to learn about different styles of Bonsai cutting and shaping. A related user story might read:

“As a new Bonsai tree owner, I want to learn about different Bonsai styles so that I can pick the right one for my tree.” 

Step 3: Create acceptance criteria

Create at least two acceptance criteria for each story, and add them to the template. Remember that acceptance criteria help your team establish a Definition of Done. They represent the things your team needs to accomplish before they can consider the user story complete.

For example, the acceptance criteria for the Bonsai styles user story could include:

  1. “Customers can access a guide to different styles (formal & informal upright, broom, cascade, etc.) on website”
  2. “Customers can take a quiz to match their trees to suitable styles”

Step 4: Check your stories against the I.N.V.E.S.T. criteria

Next, consult the I.N.V.E.S.T. framework to make sure your user stories are concise, specific, and actionable.

  • Independent: The story’s completion is not dependent on another story. 
  • Negotiable: There is room for negotiation and discussion about how to complete the story.
  • Valuable: Completing the user story will deliver value for the user role. 
  • Estimable: The Definition of Done must be clear so that the team can give the story an estimate.
  • Small: Each user story and the work necessary to complete it should fit within a planned Sprint. 
  • Testable: A test can be conducted to make sure the story meets the acceptance criteria (even if the test is not yet planned). 

You may not be able to account for all the I.N.V.E.S.T. criteria in this exercise, but you should try to meet as many as you can. If a story meets three or fewer criteria, consider revising it.

Step 5: Title each user story

Create a title for each story and add it to the template. The titles should briefly describe the desired outcome for the user role, so the team can reference them quickly.

Step 6: Add an epic title

Create an epic title that can serve as a heading or a theme for all six stories—for example, “Plant Care Initiatives”—and add it to the Backlog template. 

Note: Keep in mind that a real Product Backlog would encompass all aspects of the project, including many different epics. For your reference, we have created a second epic as an example.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following elements in your completed Product Backlog:

  • The Backlog contains six user stories.
  • The stories follow the correct construction: “As a <user role> I want <this action> so that I can <get this value>.”
  • The stories follow the I.N.V.E.S.T. framework.
  • Each story has two pieces of acceptance criteria.
  • The acceptance criteria are actionable tasks for the Scrum Team.
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • N​o

Q2. Select the user role that best completes the following user story:

“As a(n) _____, I want to purchase hard-to-find plants so that I can expand my collection of rare flowers and greenery.”

  • new plant owner
  • existing customer
  • home gardener
  • plant expert

Q3. Consider the following user story: 

“As a plant owner, I want to learn from other, more experienced plant owners so that I can better care for my plant.”

Which of the following pieces of acceptance criteria are appropriate for this story? Select all that apply.

  • Ability to join a mailing list
  •  Ability to access an “Expert Advice” section on the website
  • Ability to sign up for Q&A sessions with plant experts
  • Ability to join an online discussion group for trading plant care tips

Q4. Which of the following user stories is complete and follows the correct structure?

  • “As a plant owner, I want to know how much sunlight my plant needs so that I can maximize its growth.”
  • “I want to purchase plants, but I’m worried they won’t get to me safely.”
  • “As a customer, I want to be able to access my account dashboard quickly and easily.”
  • “I want to order plant care tools so that I can keep my plants healthy.”

Q5. Which of the following user stories could lead to the creation of a discussion group or a live customer chat option? Select all that apply. 

  • “As a new plant owner, I want to purchase low-maintenance plants so that I can care for them easily.”
  • “As a plant expert, I want to connect with other customers so that I can discuss plant care tips and tricks.”
  • “As a plant owner, I want to get expert help and advice quickly so that I know what to do if my plant gets sick.”
  • “As a plant owner, I only want to purchase rare succulents but Virtual Verde does not offer any.”

Quiz 3: Activity: Create a Product Backlog in Asana

Q1. This is an optional activity. To “pass” this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below.

Activity Overview

In the activity Create a Product Backlog, you built a Product Backlog for the Virtual Verde Project. Here, you will build the same Backlog using projects, tasks, subtasks, and custom fields in Asana.

As you’ve already learned, a Product Backlog is one of the most important Scrum artifacts and functions as the single authoritative source for project tasks. It contains all of the features, requirements, and activities associated with the project deliverables in one place.

Since it’s a living artifact, you need to update and reorganize the Product Backlog according to the Product Owner’s evolving project needs. Tools, like Asana, can automate some of this work for you. Many organizations encourage these types of tools to manage complex projects with multiple stakeholders. 

This activity is designed to help you become familiar with Asana and provide context that can help you discuss or demonstrate your capabilities in job interviews.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Step 1: Log in to Asana or create a new account

This activity involves some Asana Premium features. You will not be able to complete Steps 6 and 7 without an active Premium trial or Premium account.

If you don’t have an Asana account, you can create one for free here. When you sign up, your free 30-day Premium trial will start automatically. If you signed up for Asana in an earlier course and are still within the 30-day trial, you can log in to that account to access Premium features.

If you already have a free Asana account, or your free 30-day trial has ended, you can create a new account to start a new trial and access Premium features for this activity. 

You’ll be prompted to create a project as part of the sign-up process—you can create one for anything you might be working on. 

Step 2: Access the Asana Sprint Planning template

  1. From the Asana Home screen, go to Recent Projects and select New Project
  2. Then choose Use a template to access the template library. 
  3. Select the “Sprint Planning” template from the General Templates list. (If you can’t find the “Sprint Planning” template, go to Type and select Product.)
  4. Select Use Template.
  5. Give your project a title. (The default name will be “Sprint Planning.” You can keep this title or give it a different name. You also have the option to adjust your Team and Privacy settings, but you don’t need to change them for this exercise.)
  6. Finally, select Create project to launch your new project in Board view, which resembles and works like a Kanban board.

Note: If you can’t find the “Sprint Planning” template in Asana, you can access it directly here. Then complete steps 4-6 above to create your project.

Step 3: Add user story titles to the “Backlog” column

Add user story titles to the backlog column as tasks. To do this, select +Add task and enter a user story title in the task card. Each user story title should have its own card.

You can enter your user story titles from the last activity or use the ones from this list:

  1. Low-maintenance options
  2. Plant care tips
  3. Plant care tools
  4. Watering reminders
  5. Expert help and advice
  6. Return policy

Step 4:  Enter six user stories (one story per task)

Click on a task to open its task detail pane. Find the “Description” field and add a user story to the task description. As a reminder, each user story should follow this construction: As a <user role> I want <this action> so that I can <get this value>. 

You can enter your user stories from the last activity or use the ones from the list below:

  1. As a potential customer, I want to find out which plants are easiest to care for so that I can purchase low-maintenance options.
  2. As a plant owner, I want to access care instructions easily so that I can keep my plant alive longer.
  3. As a plant owner, I want to have the right tools to care for my plant so that I can keep it healthy and beautiful.
  4. As a plant owner, I want to be reminded when to water my plants so that I don’t under- or overwater them.
  5. As a plant owner, I want to get expert help and advice quickly so that I know what to do if my plant gets sick. 
  6. As a customer, I want a hassle-free way to return my order so that I can be sure I have the right plant for me.

Step 5: Add acceptance criteria as subtasks

Add two pieces of acceptance criteria and add them as subtasks for at least three of the user stories you entered. To create a subtask, click into a card to open the task detail pane. Select Add Subtask toward the bottom of the pane (you may need to scroll down to find the Add Subtask button). 

You can add your acceptance criteria from the last activity or use the ones from the list below:

Low-maintenance options

  • Ability to sort plants by “beginner,” “intermediate,” and “advanced” 
  • Ability to search for plants with similar care needs

Plant care tips

  • Receive plant care leaflets with each order
  • Option to sign up for monthly emails with seasonal care tips

Plant care tools

  • Can purchase plant care starter kits
  • Option to buy partial kits or single tools

Note: Once you close the task detail pane, you can expand subtasks in each card by clicking the number in the lower-right corner.

Step 6: Add a custom field for epic title

Finally, create a custom field for your epic title.

  1. In Board view, click Customize near the top-right corner of your board, and select Add Field
  2. Type “Epic” under Field title. The Field type should be “Drop-down.” 
  3. Rename “Option 1” with your epic title (e.g., “Plant Care Initiatives”). You can delete “Option 2.”
  4. Select Create Field.

Step 7: Add user stories to your epic

To assign a user story to an epic, open its task detail pane. Then select an epic from the dropdown next to “Epic.” You can also assign user stories to epics from List view by selecting an epic from the dropdowns in the “Epic” column.

When you click on a card, your Asana project should resemble the screenshot below:

If you followed all the steps, your Asana board should be laid out like this:

For more information, and to practice using Asana for Agile and Scrum processes, check out Asana for Agile and Scrum. In the upcoming course activities, you will have more opportunities to practice working in Asana. 

Did you complete this optional activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 4: Activity: Add estimation

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 3 out of 3 points, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will add estimates to user stories to the Virtual Verde Product Backlog to capture how much effort each user story will take to complete. These estimations help the Product Owner assess the workload captured in the Backlog, which helps them prioritize tasks.

Note: Throughout this course, you will complete tasks normally done by others (like the Development Team or Product Owner). Even if you don’t perform them yourself, it is important that you understand these processes. 

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step-instructions. 

Along with the Product Owner and the team, you’ve created user stories and acceptance criteria for the Virtual Verde Product Backlog. Now you need to add effort estimations to each user story, which will help the team understand the amount of effort each task will take to complete. Once you have your estimations, the Product Owner can make any necessary adjustments to item priority in the Product Backlog. This information will help your team plan the upcoming Sprint.

The Product Owner has already added a value for each user story in the Product Backlog. In this exercise, value represents how valuable the final deliverable is to the user role or customer. These value points are designated by dollar signs (so, $ = 1 value point, $$ = 2 value points, etc.).

You will work with the Development Team to determine relative effort estimations for each Backlog item. Relative effort estimation isn’t just how much effort an item should take to complete. Instead, the Development Team evaluates the amount of effort each item takes compared to other items in the Product Backlog.

You can use a number of different methods to estimate effort. Your team has opted to use Story Points, which are based on the Fibonacci sequence of numbers (1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, etc.). For example, an item with an effort estimation of “1” should take little effort to complete, while an item estimated at “13” or “21” will take much more effort. There is no prescribed formula for determining Story Points. Rather, teams should work together to compare task estimations to one another.

Note: In a real project, your team would determine these estimations together, since it is crucial that the people who complete the work provide the estimates.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Add estimation

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Add estimationXLSX FileDownload file

Step 2: Review the Product Backlog values and the Bonsai Trees estimates for the Bonsai Trees epic

In the previous activity, you entered new plant care user stories into a Product Backlog that already contained a second epic (“Bonsai Trees”). Before you add estimates to your user stories, review the estimates for the Bonsai epic. You can use these numbers as a baseline to determine the relative estimations for the plant care epic.

Step 3: Add the effort estimates to the Plant Care Initiatives epic

Consider how much effort the acceptance criteria for the “Plant Care Initiatives” compared to those in the “Bonsai Trees” epic. (If you’re not sure, try discussing the tasks with a friend. That’s what you’d do on a real Scrum Team!) Then select a Story Point value from the dropdown that makes sense relative to the “Bonsai Trees” estimations. Remember that “21” takes far more effort than “1.”

For example, the user story “As a Bonsai tree owner, I want to have the right tools to care for my tree so I can shape and style it properly,” has an effort estimation of 13. Think about whether the “Plant Care Initiatives” user stories require more, less, or about the same amount of effort to make your estimations.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following criteria in your completed adding estimation template:

  • Each story has an effort estimation in Story Points (1, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21).
Did you complete this activity?

Yes

No

Q2. How many Story Points did you assign to the user story, “As a potential customer, I want to find out which plants are easiest to care for so that I can purchase low-maintenance options”? Explain why you chose that number.

How many Story Points did you assign to the user story, “As a potential customer, I want to find out which plants are easiest to care for so that I can purchase low-maintenance options”? Explain why you chose that number.

Q3. How many Story Points did you assign to the user story, “As a customer, I want a hassle-free way to return my order so that I can be sure I have the right plant for me.”? Explain why you chose that number.

How many Story Points did you assign to the user story, “As a customer, I want a hassle-free way to return my order so that I can be sure I have the right plant for me.”? Explain why you chose that number.

Quiz 5: Activity: Adding estimation in Asana

Q1. This is an optional activity. To “pass” this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below.

Activity Overview

In the activity Add estimation, you updated the Virtual Verde Product Backlog by adding effort estimation to user stories and acceptance criteria. Here, you will add those same estimates and prioritize them using Asana.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Yellow line

Step 1: Log in to Asana or create a new account 

This activity involves some Asana Premium features. You will not be able to complete all of the activity steps without an active Premium trial or Premium account.

If you don’t have an Asana account, you can create one for free here. When you sign up, your free 30-day Premium trial will start automatically. If you signed up for Asana in an earlier course and are still within the 30-day trial, you can log in to that account to access Premium features.

If you already have a free Asana account, or your free 30-day trial has ended, you can create a new account to start a new trial and access Premium features for this activity. 

Step 2: Download the Backlog template as a CSV file

Before you add estimation, you’ll need to download the Backlog template as a CSV file and then import it to Asana. 

Note: .xlsx files are not compatible with the Asana CSV importer tool.

Download the template as a CSV file: Asana Backlog Template with EstimationCSV FileDownload file

Step 3: Upload the CSV template to Asana to create a new project

To create a new project using the CSV file, follow the instructions below:

  1. From the Asana Home screen, go to Recent Projects and select New Project
  2. Choose Import spreadsheet
  3. You’ll be prompted to give your project a name. Title it “Virtual Verde Backlog.” (You also have the option to adjust your Team and Privacy settings, but you don’t need to change them for this exercise.)
  4. Choose Select file to import
  5. On the next screen, choose Select a CSV file to import to upload your file. (You can also drag and drop your CSV file to the upload area.)
  6. Finally, select Go to project to launch your new project in List view.

Once you’ve created your new project, it should resemble the screenshot below:

Step 4: Add the effort estimation 

When you imported the CSV file, Asana automatically generated some custom fields for your Backlog: “Epic,” “Value,” and “Estimate (Story Points).”

Use the dropdowns in the “Estimate” column to add estimates to your Backlog items. You can enter your estimations from the last activity or use the ones from the list below:

  • Low-maintenance options: 8
  • Plant care tips: 8
  • Plant care tools: 13
  • Watering reminders: 5
  • Expert help and advice: 8
  • Return policy: 5

Step 5: Sort user stories

Experiment with sorting your user stories by custom field. Depending how you want to organize your Backlog, you could choose to sort by the “Epic,” “Value,” or “Estimate” fields.

Finish by sorting your project by “Value.” Then, select the three dots at the upper-right corner of the Backlog and choose Save layout as default. This will make sorting by “Value” the default layout for this project.

Step 6: Access Board view

Once you’ve organized your user stories, switch to Board view to work with them in a Kanban-style Backlog. Finally, to make Board view the default layout, select the three dots at the upper-right corner of the Backlog and choose Save layout as default.

Your finished Backlog should resemble the screenshot below:

The beauty of using a tool like Asana to manage a Backlog is how quickly and easily you can convert your plans into action! You can give each user story an assignee and a due date to make it clear who’s responsible for what, and when it needs to get done. Then, you can keep everyone on the same page by publishing weekly status updates, highlighting accomplishments, progress, and blockers

For more information on using Asana for Agile processes, check out Asana for Agile and Scrum.

Did you complete this optional activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 6: Test your knowledge: The Sprint

Q1. Which of the following are included in a Sprint’s set of events? Select all that apply.

  • Sprint Review
  • Sprint Closing
  • Sprint Planning
  • Daily Scrum
  • Sprint Retrospective

Q2. What are the benefits of timeboxes? Select all that apply.

  • They create a sense of urgency to drive prioritization.
  • They help the team develop a predictable rhythm to their work.
  • They enable the team to visually understand the work.
  • They provide a window of focus to improve productivity.

Q3. How long is a typical Sprint’s timebox?

  • Between one and three days
  • Between one and four weeks
  • Between two and three months

Q4. Which of the following factors should you consider when setting the length of a Sprint’s timebox? Select all that apply.

  • How much overhead—such as testing and review—goes into the delivery of the product
  • The expected frequency of changes
  • How much focused time the solution Developers need to build a Backlog item
  • The likelihood that the project will go over budget

Quiz 7: Activity: Create and manage Sprints in Asana

Q1. This is an optional activity. To “pass” this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below.

Activity Overview

In the activity Create a Sprint Plan and Sprint Backlog, you planned the first Sprint for the Virtual Verde project. Here, you will recreate planning that Sprint using Asana.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Step 1: Log in to Asana or create a new account 

This activity involves some Asana Premium features. You will not be able to complete all of the activity steps without an active Premium trial or Premium account.

If you don’t have an Asana account, you can create one for free here. When you sign up, your free 30-day Premium trial will start automatically. If you signed up for Asana in an earlier course and are still within the 30-day trial, you can log in to that account to access Premium features.

If you already have a free Asana account, or your free 30-day trial has ended, you can create a new account to start a new trial and access Premium features for this activity. 

Step 2: Open your Backlog from the last Asana lesson OR Download the Backlog template as a CSV file

If you completed the optional activity Adding Estimations in Asana, open your Virtual Verde Backlog with estimations. (You can find it on your Home screen under Recent Projects.) Then skip to Step 4 below.

If you did not complete that activity, you’ll need to download the Backlog template as a CSV file and then import it to Asana. 

Note: .xlsx files are not compatible with the Asana CSV importer tool.

Download the template as a CSV file:Asana Sprint Backlog TemplateCSV FileDownload file

Step 3: Upload the CSV template to Asana to create a new project

To create a new project using the CSV file, follow the instructions below:

  1. From the Asana Home screen, go to Recent Projects and select New Project
  2. Choose Import spreadsheet
  3. You’ll be prompted to give your project a name. Title it “Virtual Verde Backlog.” (You also have the option to adjust your Team and Privacy settings, but you don’t need to change them for this exercise.)
  4. Choose Select file to import
  5. On the next screen, choose Select a CSV file to import to upload your file. (You can also drag and drop your CSV file to the upload area.)
  6. Finally, select Go to project to launch your new project in List view.

Step 4: Add a custom field for Sprints 

Finally, Create a new custom field to organize your Sprints. 

  1. Select Customize near the top-right corner of your Backlog, and choose Add Field. 
  2. Type “Sprint” under Field title. The Field type should be “Drop-down.” 
  3. Rename “Option 1” as “Current Sprint.” You can also rename “Option 2” as Next Sprint, but you only need to build one Sprint for this exercise.
  4. Select Create field.

Step 5: Assign items to the Sprint Backlog

Assign Backlog items to the “Current Sprint” using the dropdowns under the “Sprint” column. If you created a second Sprint option, do the same for “Next Sprint.” 

Since the purpose of this activity is to practice building Sprints in Asana, it doesn’t matter which items you add to the Sprint Backlog. You can assign them as you did in the activity Create a Sprint Plan and Sprint Backlog or assign them differently. 

Step 6: Sort by Sprint

To order your Backlog by Sprint, go to the Sort menu and choose Sprint

Then go back to the Sort menu to turn off  the Sort within sections option. Disabling this option will group tasks by the custom field you selected (in this case, the Sprint field). It will also give you a sum of each Sprint’s estimation points (and any other numeric fields) at the bottom of each column. This makes it easy to keep track of how many points you’ve assigned to each Sprint and ensure you don’t exceed the team’s capacity.Screenshot of Asana menu to sort within sections

Step 7: Add due date

Finally, add a due date for the “Current Sprint” items under the “Due date” column. In the activity Create a Sprint Plan and Sprint Backlog, the Sprint is scheduled to end on March 19th, but you can add any date.

Your completed Sprint Backlog should be laid out something like this:

There’s so much more you can do with Sprint planning in Asana! You can automate repetitive steps by adding rules, plan and visualize your team’s work using Timeline view, or create a custom template so you can easily launch a new Sprint-planning project without starting from scratch. Check out this article on Sprint planning in Asana for inspiration!

Did you complete this optional activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 8: Activity: Recap a Sprint Retrospective

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will develop a list of takeaways and action items from a Sprint Retrospective. A Sprint Retrospective is one of the five main Sprint events and gives a chance for the Scrum Team to get together and discuss the work they just finished. Your task is to write an email to the Scrum Team recapping the Retrospective.

Note: Throughout this course, you will complete tasks normally done by others (like the Development Team or Product Owner). Even if you don’t perform them yourself, it is important that you understand these processes.

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step-instructions. 

The Virtual Verde team has completed the first Sprint based on the Backlog you created in the last activity, Create a Sprint Plan and Sprint Backlog. The team also gathered for a Sprint Retrospective to go over what worked well during the Sprint, and what they want to change for the future. Your team reviewed each item from the Sprint, and discussed how the work went and how the team performed.

After the meeting, you took photos of the whiteboards your team created during the discussion, knowing you’d need the notes to reflect on team accomplishments and what to change for the future.

Note: Any team member can write Retrospective recaps. Even if you don’t write them, this activity will help you recognize effective recap emails.

Step-By-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Sprint retrospective email

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Sprint retrospective emailDOCX FileDownload file

Step 2: Review the whiteboard notes from the Sprint Retrospective

Open the slide deck with your whiteboard notes  (click the link and select “Use Template” to make a copy in Google Slides or download the notes using the attachment below).  Then review the team’s successes, what worked well in terms of process and performance, and what issues you need to resolve for future Sprints.

The team used a +/Δ format for the discussion: They listed what went well under the + (or plus) heading, and listed roadblocks and things they want to change going forward under the Δ (or Delta) heading (Δ is the mathematical symbol for change).

Download whiteboard notes attachment:Activity_ Sprint retro whiteboardsPPTX FileDownload file

Step 3: Make a list of takeaways

Make a list of 5-10 key takeaways from the whiteboard notes. These could be about team performance, tasks accomplished, workflow, communication, or anything else you discussed. 

For example, a note reading, “Didn’t truly understand the scope of this item,” could translate into the takeaway, “Let’s review how we do our estimates next time, as we may not be accounting for the full scope.”

Step 4: Write a recap email to the Scrum Team

Finally, compose an email recapping the meeting and listing the key takeaways. Be sure to include:

  • A Subject line: It should be brief and describe the content of the message.
  • An Introduction: Greet the team and explain why you are sending the email.
  • A Recap: Summarize your thoughts on the retrospective. Were you pleased with how the meeting went? How much did the team accomplish?
  • Key takeaways: List 5-10 key takeaways from the whiteboard notes. What went well with the Sprint? What issues need to be addressed before the next Sprint?
  • Next steps: Wrap up the email and propose next steps.
  • A Closing: Sign off with your name and title.
What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following elements in your completed Sprint Retrospective email:

  • A subject line
  • An intro
  • A recap of the Sprint Retrospective
  • 5-10 key takeaways based on the discussion notes
  • Next steps
  • A closing
Did you complete this activity?
  • Y​es
  • N​o

Agile Project Management Weekly Challenge 03 Answers

Q1. Which of the following best describes why Scrum Teams refer to the Product Backlog as a living artifact?

  • The Product Owner adds items at any time.
  • The team only adds items at the end of a Sprint.
  • The Product Owner only adds items at the end of a Sprint.
  • The stakeholders can add items at any time.

Q2. A Product Owner writing a user story needs the story to fit within the planned Sprint. If the user story is too large, they break it down into multiple, scaled-down stories in order to meet which of the I.N.V.E.S.T. story writing criteria?

  • Negotiable
  • Estimitable
  • Small
  • Valuable
  • Independent

Q3. As a Product Owner, you need to add estimates to your Backlog for a small number of items. You’d like your team to reach a consensus on the number of items, and you’d also like to incorporate the Fibonacci sequence. Which effort estimation technique should you use?

  • Affinity Mapping
  • Planning Poker™
  • The Bucket System
  • Dot Voting

Q4. As a Product Owner, you set the initial Sprint duration the team has to work on their items. This refers to what Scrum concept?

  • Interval
  • Schedule
  • Time frame
  • Timebox

Q5. During what Scrum event will the Scrum Master ask  s like: What has been our average velocity? Who on the team has any upcoming vacations or work conflicts? Who is responsible for what Sprint tasks?

  • Sprint Review
  • Daily Scrum
  • Sprint Retrospective
  • Sprint planning

Q6. Which role is responsible for assisting team members to clear obstacles and unblock their work?

  • Product Owner
  • Another teammate
  • Scrum Master
  • Key stakeholder

Q7. Fill in the blank: Retrospectives in Scrum happen _____ a traditional project.

  • less often than in
  • more often than in
  • as often as in

Q8. Fill in the blank: When a team conducts Sprint Planning, they use the average velocity of _____ to determine how many items they can safely add to their Sprint Backlog.

  • at least three days
  • at least three Sprints
  • at least three weeks
  • at least three story points

Q9. Why would a Scrum Team use a Kanban board? Select all that apply.

  • To take fewer notes
  • To give a better sense of the team’s flow of work
  • To make it easier to notice work-in-progress (WIP) limits
  • To visualize tasks

Q10. Which tool is helpful for documenting Backlog and item information?

  • Video chat
  • Spreadsheets
  • Presentations
  • Email

Agile Project Management Week 4 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Reflection: Delivering value

Q1. In the Sephora case study reading, you learned how the company benefits from applying the Scrum framework. Their Scrum Teams are able to work cross-functionally and bring value to their customers through rapid testing, analysis, and rollout. As a thought experiment, let’s work through how an Agile approach can help project teams increase value delivery. Remember that Agile teams deliver value by building the right thing, building the thing right, and running it right.

Now that you know more about value-driven delivery, you can put that knowledge into practice.

Are you ready?

I’m ready

Q2. Think of a product or service you use regularly. It can be a real or imaginary device (e.g. smartphone, universal remote) or software (e.g. email, social networking, video conferencing). Consider two or three of its most important features: How do these features create value for different customers? If your team were to build this product or service, what would you do to make sure the team builds the right thing? Write 3-4 sentences summarizing your response.

Think of a product or service you use regularly. It can be a real or imaginary device (e.g. smartphone, universal remote) or software (e.g. email, social networking, video conferencing). Consider two or three of its most important features: How do these features create value for different customers? If your team were to build this product or service, what would you do to make sure the team builds the right thing? Write 3-4 sentences summarizing your response.

Q3. Now imagine you are a project manager overseeing the development of the latest version of your selected product or service. Write 3-4 sentences about what you can do to create value for customers and help them achieve their goals—that is, to build the thing right.

Now imagine you are a project manager overseeing the development of the latest version of your selected product or service. Write 3-4 sentences about what you can do to create value for customers and help them achieve their goals—that is, to build the thing right.

Quiz 2: Activity: Make changes to your release plan

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive at least 75%, or 3 out of 4 points, by completing the activity and answering corresponding quiz questions. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will evaluate how changes and updates could affect your release plan. Changes can arise at any time, and you must know how to determine the scope of the impact and solve problems quickly.

Note: Throughout this course, you will complete tasks normally done by others (like the Development Team or Product Owner). Even if you don’t perform them yourself, it is important that you understand these processes.

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step-instructions. 

You and your Scrum team at Office Green have conducted a test run, created a Sprint Plan, and mitigated project issues. Your team has completed the first of three releases for Virtual Verde, and now you’re coming up on the second!

As the second and third project releases approach, you receive three emails that could lead to changes in the release plan. Your team needs to evaluate each email to understand how (or if) it requires changes to the release plan. If you think it does, you will write an email to the Scrum Team updating them on the situation and proposing possible solutions.

Note: Any member of your team can write these emails. Even if you don’t write them, this activity will help you recognize effective examples.

Step-By-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Emails for release plan

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Emails for the release planDOCX FileDownload file

Step 2: Review the release plan

To go over the release plan, follow the link to access the file in Resources. Make note of the timeline and the things you want to accomplish for each release.

Step 3: Review the three emails

Review the three emails in the template (from the Content Manager and Vendor Manager). Think about whether each update will affect the timeline or content of your release plan.

Step 4: Consider your options and make a plan

For each email, answer the following questions:

  1. Does the update require your team to take action? If so, what are some possible options to address the update?
  2. Do you need to consult anyone to make a decision? If so, who? 
  3. Do you need additional information to help reach a decision? If so, what do you need to know?

Step 5: Write an email to the team (if needed)

If you think changes to the release plan are necessary, write an email to the Scrum Team. If you don’t think changes are necessary, you can skip this step.

Your message should let them know about the update and describe your proposed course of action. Your email should include: 

  • Email recipients 
  • A subject line that includes any necessary updates
  • A body that describes  a new approach for the team
  • A closing

Step 6: Repeat for each email

Repeat Steps 2-4 for the remaining emails.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following criteria for each email in the template:

  • Options for addressing each update (if needed)
  • A list of team members or stakeholders to consult to reach a decision (if needed)
  • Additional information you might need to help you reach a decision (if needed) 
  • An email to the Scrum Team informing them of the update describing your proposed course of action (if needed)
Did you complete this activity?
  • Y​es
  • N​o

Q2. What  s should you ask when there is a last-minute change, like the Bonsai tree supplier no longer carrying Bonsai trees? Select all that apply.

  • Do you need additional information to help reach a decision?
  • Do you need to consult anyone to make a decision?
  • How can we make the minimum amount of changes and keep our release plan on track?
  • Does the update require your team to take action?

Q3. What are the best options for addressing the vendor database issue? Select all that apply. 

  • Go back to the old software temporarily while the new is being fixed
  • Shut down all ordering and shipping until the problem can be solved
  • Manually track inventory until the software is fixed
  • Purchase new software/new database

Q4. What are some possible options for addressing the Bonsai tree supply issue? Select all that apply. 

  • Pass the issue along to someone else
  • Remove Bonsai trees from the website until you find a new vendor
  • Replace the Bonsai trees with a different plant
  • Source Bonsai trees elsewhere

Quiz 3: Test your knowledge: Agile coaching

Q1. What is the difference between managing and coaching?

  • Managing is about encouraging the team; coaching is about delegating tasks.
  • Managing is used in Agile; coaching is used in Waterfall.
  • Managing is about listening; coaching is about asserting.
  • Managing is about giving direction; coaching is about teaching.

Q2. Which of the following responsibilities are part of your role as an Agile coach? Select all that apply.

  • Design the plays (detail how work gets done) with the team.
  • Solve problems for the team.
  • Provide feedback to the team.
  • Celebrate and learn with the team.

Q3. What part of your role as an Agile coach involves reviewing your team’s performance to find patterns that work or need improvement?

  • Design the plays (detail how work gets done) with the team.
  • Provide feedback to the team.
  • Celebrate and learn with the team.

Q4. How can you help your team build confidence and capabilities through coaching? Select all that apply.

  • Support them by acting as an accessible resource.
  • Assist them by stepping in to solve difficult problems.
  • Motivate them by pointing out the value in their work.
  • Encourage and appreciate them by expressing confidence in their efforts.

Quiz 4: Reflection: Coaching versus managing

Q1. Now that you know more about coaching and managing teams, you can put that knowledge into practice.

Consider the following scenario: Imagine that a project manager oversees the development of a new financial wellness app. The project team includes both seasoned and less experienced members. Senior team members are impatient with their junior colleagues, leading to resentment and low productivity. This creates tension, and the team struggles to work together effectively.

The project manager responds to the situation by separating the two camps: senior members get more responsibilities, while junior members work together on separate features. The project manager also meets privately with the junior members to offer tips on working more efficiently. Productivity increases, but the breakdown in communication leads to the team repeating work and building the wrong features.

As a thought experiment, let’s compare this scenario to the coaching and managing styles of leadership. Remember that management is about keeping teams on track by providing clear directions. Coaching is about creating motivation and showing support, encouragement, and appreciation.

Are you ready?

I’m ready!

Q2. Write 3-4 sentences describing the coaching and managing techniques the project manager uses. Then discuss what they do right and where they can improve.

Write 3-4 sentences describing the coaching and managing techniques the project manager uses. Then discuss what they do right and where they can improve.

Q3. Now imagine you are the project manager in this scenario. Write a 3-4 sentences about how you can balance coaching and managing techniques to build a more cohesive and high-functioning team. Describe some specific things you can do to motivate, support, encourage, and appreciate your team.

Now imagine you are the project manager in this scenario. Write a 3-4 sentences about how you can balance coaching and managing techniques to build a more cohesive and high-functioning team. Describe some specific things you can do to motivate, support, encourage, and appreciate your team.

Quiz 5: Test your knowledge: Agile challenges

Q1. Imagine you are the Scrum Master launching the first phase of services for a company project. Your team takes a long time to finish tasks and, as a result, they are a month behind schedule. How can you diagnose the problem and help your team hit their targets? Select all that apply.

  • Replace slower team members with more efficient ones.
  • Use Retrospectives to discover opportunities to improve how the team is working.
  • Prioritize the right user stories and focus on only a few per Sprint.
  • Run more demos of solutions with the team to identify areas for improvement.

Q2. Which of the following are signs that an Agile team may be experiencing issues with team dynamics and culture? Select all that apply.

  • Low team morale
  • Low team conflict
  • High team conflict
  • High team productivity

Q3. As a project manager or Scrum Master, which of the following strategies can help you fix issues with team dynamics and culture? Select all that apply.

  • Take a training class together.
  • Run a team brainstorm session about how to work better together.
  • Change up the team’s workflows.
  • Ask project stakeholders to intervene.

Q4. During a Retrospective, you discover that your team cannot deliver the product on schedule because you set an unrealistic expectation with your stakeholders. What can you do to ensure a healthy roadmap management plan going forward? Select all that apply.

  • Promote knowledge sharing between the Product Owner and the Development Team.
  • Hold regular roadmap reviews with the entire team.
  • Simplify the roadmap by scaling back the project scope.
  • Agree up front about how to handle new ideas and opportunities.

Quiz 6: Test your knowledge: Frameworks for scaling Agile

Q1. Which two of the following are frameworks for scaling Agile in a larger organization?

  • Scrum of Scrums
  • Business agility
  • DevOps
  • Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD)

Q2. Which scaled Agile framework coordinates multiple Scrum Teams and integrates their work to create one larger, cohesive deliverable?

  • Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD)
  • Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe)
  • Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS)
  • Scrum of Scrums

Q3. What is the benefit of business agility?

  • It serves as a strict instruction manual for scaling Agile, rather than a general framework.
  • It helps organizations thrive in high-VUCA environments.
  • It combines software development with IT operations.
  • It helps teams rapidly evolve large-scale software systems.

Q4. Imagine you are a project manager at a video game company. Your last large-scale software release contained so many technical issues that they upset your customers and overwhelmed your Developers. To ensure that your next rollout is secure and reliable, you recruit new team members with information technology (IT) expertise. Which of the following approaches is best for your new project?

  • Business Agility
  • Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS)
  • Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe)
  • DevOps

Agile Project Management Weekly Challenge 04 Answers

Q1. Does delivering value mean improving compliance adherence for a business?

  • Yes. Compliance adherence is the most valuable asset for a business, regardless of what the business needs to accomplish.
  • No. Value only refers to the financial benefits for a business.
  • Sometimes. Value can mean different things for each business based on what they hope to accomplish.

Q2. Which of the following are components of a typical value roadmap? Select all that apply.

  • A product vision
  • A mission statement
  • A product roadmap
  • A release plan
  • A product playbook

Q3. Which of the following provides an overview of the expected product, its high-level requirements, and an estimated schedule for reaching milestones?

  • A product vision
  • A product roadmap
  • A value playbook
  • A Product Backlog

Q4. What are some common pitfalls of making a product roadmap? Select all that apply.

  • Pressure teams to achieve deadlines no matter what it takes
  • Conduct regular reviews of the roadmap with stakeholders and the team
  • Put more work into the roadmap than the deliverables
  • Let stakeholders think the roadmap is set and unchangeable

Q5. Imagine you’re a project manager creating a project roadmap. You meet with the Product Owner to estimate the team’s capacity and velocity—their ability to complete work at a certain pace. Which Agile principle does this scenario represent?

  • Stakeholders and the team developers must work together daily throughout the project.
  • Deliver working software frequently, with a preference to the shorter timescale.
  • Agile processes promote sustainable development—the team developers should be able to maintain a constant workload.
  • At regular intervals, the development team meets to reflect on how to become more effective.

Q6. As a project manager, your organization makes a shift to Agile. To create a sense of urgency, which  s should you ask your team about what’s working, and what’s not working right now?

  • How can we change the company’s stated mission or values to better align with our work?
  • How can we help you become more productive and supported in your work?
  • What allows our competitors to outperform us and get their products and features to market more quickly?
  • What can we do to cut costs in our product creation and Sprint process?

Q7. Imagine you are a project manager overseeing the adoption of Agile at your organization. When setting goals for the project, you consider the timeline, specific results, and reason for the change. You put this information in a document the whole team can access. Which of the three keys to influence does this scenario demonstrate?

  • Clarify measurable results
  • Find vital behaviors
  • Leverage the six sources of influence

Q8. Imagine you are a project manager for a mobile game that is experiencing significant technical issues. While working on the update, your team members appear unhappy and arrive at work late. What can you do to boost morale and improve the quality of deliverables? Select all that apply.

  • Take a training class on team dynamics and how to better work together
  • Run a team brainstorm session to identify areas for improvement
  • Require positive attitudes in team meetings
  • Change up the workflows by pairing people to work together on hard tasks
  • Push back the next release date to give the team more time

Q9. What can you do to avoid making too many or unfounded product assumptions? Select all that apply.

  • Reuse assumptions from similar, past projects.
  • Conduct surveys or focus groups to double-check assumptions, where necessary.
  • Discuss assumptions as a team.
  • Document assumptions and make them transparent to all.
  • Ask the Product Owner to double-check and approve assumptions.

Q10. Fill in the blank: DevOps combines software development with _____.

  • Scrum operations
  • Change management operations
  • Information Technology (IT) operations
  • Business operations
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