Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Coursera Quiz Answers

All Week Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Coursera Quiz Answers

This is the second course in the Google Project Management Certificate program. This course will show you how to set a project up for success in the first phase of the project life cycle: the project initiation phase. In exploring the key components of this phase, you’ll learn how to define and manage project goals, deliverables, scope, and success criteria.

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Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Week 1 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Reflection: Project initiation and key components

Q1. In this exercise, you will read a scenario and identify the six key components of project initiation:

  • Goals
  • Scope
  • Project deliverables
  • Success criteria
  • Stakeholders
  • Resources

Start by reading the scenario:

Imagine you are a project manager at an educational software company. You’re assigned a new project to develop a digital grading platform for a local high school. Before beginning the project, you meet with teachers, school administrators, the school IT department, and the district superintendent to discuss the project and get their input. 

During these meetings, you organized your thoughts by writing down project key components that the stakeholders have requested. Your notes on the key components are:

  • $150,000 maximum budget  
  • Team: can add one member from the school IT department  
  • Platform should allow teachers to enter grades and allow students/parents to view grades  
  • Need full teacher buy-in at high school: 100% adoption within next nine months   
  • Project should focus only on the digital grading platform and NOT impact other digital platforms (ex. attendance, school lunch payments)  
  • Overall, the school is seeking a platform for digital grading 

The next step in the project is to organize the key components into a project charter. You will then present the charter to the individuals involved with the project. The project charter ensures everyone is aligned before planning and then executing the project.

—–

Have you read the scenario?

I have!

Q2. Which of the key components is the project’s goal? Write one sentence.

Imagine you are a project manager at an educational software company. You’re assigned a new project to develop a digital grading platform for a local high school. Before beginning the project, you meet with teachers, school administrators, the school IT department, and the district superintendent to discuss the project and get their input. 

Q3. Which key component outlines the project’s scope? Write one sentence.

Imagine you are a project manager at an educational software company. You’re assigned a new project to develop a digital grading platform for a local high school. Before beginning the project, you meet with teachers, school administrators, the school IT department, and the district superintendent to discuss the project and get their input. 

Q4. Which key component is the project deliverable? Write one sentence.

Imagine you are a project manager at an educational software company. You’re assigned a new project to develop a digital grading platform for a local high school. Before beginning the project, you meet with teachers, school administrators, the school IT department, and the district superintendent to discuss the project and get their input. 

Q5. Which key component outlines the project’s success criteria? Write one sentence.

Imagine you are a project manager at an educational software company. You’re assigned a new project to develop a digital grading platform for a local high school. Before beginning the project, you meet with teachers, school administrators, the school IT department, and the district superintendent to discuss the project and get their input. 

Q6. Who are the project stakeholders? Write one sentence.

Imagine you are a project manager at an educational software company. You’re assigned a new project to develop a digital grading platform for a local high school. Before beginning the project, you meet with teachers, school administrators, the school IT department, and the district superintendent to discuss the project and get their input. 

Q7. Which key components outline the resources you will have at your disposal for the project?

Imagine you are a project manager at an educational software company. You’re assigned a new project to develop a digital grading platform for a local high school. Before beginning the project, you meet with teachers, school administrators, the school IT department, and the district superintendent to discuss the project and get their input. 

Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Weekly Challenge 1 Answers

Q1. What are two potential consequences of a project manager failing to properly initiate a project?

  • Stakeholders might not agree on what success looks like.
  • Resources can be underestimated.
  • New dependencies can arise.
  • External risks can affect project success.

Q2. What two  s can a project manager ask to determine a project’s costs?

  • How will the user experience be improved?
  • What value will the project create?
  • What are the ongoing project costs?
  • How much time will people have to spend on the project?

Q3. Which of the following are key components of project initiation? Select all that apply.

  • Scope
  • Success criteria
  • Deliverables
  • Resources
  • Documentation
  • Goals
  • Project charter
  • Planning

Q4. Imagine you’re the project manager of a new grocery delivery service. You meet with stakeholders to set an overarching framework of what is and is not included in the project statement of work and deliverables. Which project initiation component are you trying to determine?

  • Resources
  • Scope
  • Success criteria
  • Project charter

Q5. Imagine that the main supplier for a construction project runs out of steel girders and needs to obtain more to complete the order. Which key component of project initiation does this scenario concern?

  • Deliverables
  • Resources
  • Goals
  • Scope

Q6. What is the purpose of a project charter?

  • Determines project roles and assign associated tasks
  • Outlines how to mitigate potential risks
  • Establishes communication channels and record preferred methods
  • Defines the project and its goals and outline what is needed to accomplish them

Q7. Fill in the blank: _____ are gains that are not quantifiable.

  • Intangible benefits
  • Yearly profits
  • Ongoing costs
  • Quarterly income

Q8. You expect that a project will bring in $12,000 USD in revenue per year. You estimate it will cost $5,000 up front. You also estimate costs of $50 per month for the first 12 months, which equals $600 per year. Using the formula (G-C) ÷ C = ROI, how would you calculate the project’s return on investment (ROI) after the first 12 months?

  • (12,000 – 5,600) ÷ 5,000 = 128%
  • (12,000 – 5,000) ÷ 5,000 = 140%
  • (12,000 – 5,600) ÷ 5,600 = 114%
  • (5,600 – 5,000) ÷ 12,000 = 5%

Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Week 2 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Optional Activity: Create OKRs for your project

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will practice creating OKRs (objectives and key results) for a project. OKRs combine a goal and a metric to determine a measurable outcome. Objectives define what needs to be achieved and describe a desired outcome, while key results define how you will measure that outcome.

As a project manager, creating OKRs can help you clarify both your overall project goals and the deliverables you’ll need to accomplish those goals. You can also create project-level OKRs to help motivate your team.

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity. 

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step instructions.

Wonder City is a mid-sized city where increasing growth and traffic are impacting quality of life. According to a recent market assessment, the region’s population is expected to double in the next five years. Job growth is also expected to increase by 48%. This growth will impact street networks, parking and mobility.

Wonder City has several city-wide objectives related to reducing traffic congestion and improving the city’s infrastructure. In order to support these city-wide objectives, the Wonder City Transportation Authority (WCTA) will be launching five new bus lines. This initiative has been nicknamed Project Move It.

You have been hired as the project manager for this initiative. As the project manager, you will set OKRs to help clarify the project goals and define what needs to be done in order to deliver a successful project.

Here is some additional information about the project:

  • The project needs to be completed within two years.
  • Community member buy-in and support for the locations of the new bus lines will be required.
  • The project must adhere to all government regulations.
  • Stops along the new bus lines must connect neighboring suburbs to downtown and public resource facilities.
  • Bus lines must service at least 50% of the most densely-populated areas of Wonder City.
  • The project is intended to help improve wait times and increase ridership.
  • The plan includes a marketing campaign to promote the new lines.
Step-By-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Project Move It OKRs

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Project Move It OKRsDOCX FileDownload file

Step 2: Draft your first objective

A list of objectives for Project Move It have been provided for you below. Select one and add it next to “O1” on the first line of the OKR card. 

Potential objectives for Project Move It:

  • Actively and meaningfully engage the public to generate buy-in and project support.
  • Make it easy to get around the greater Wonder City area via public transportation.
  • Promote public transportation as a convenient alternative to driving.
  • Provide a reliable and consistent public transportation service. 

Or, if you prefer, you may draft your own objective based on the scenario.

Remember that effective objectives are:

  • Aspirational: Is the objective challenging and inspiring?
  • Aligned with company goals: Does the objective support company and/or departmental OKRs?
  • Action-oriented: Does the objective motivate the team to take initiative?
  • Concrete: Can the project team easily grasp the objective?
  • Significant: Will achieving the objective make a meaningful impact or change from where you are currently?

For example, if the objective of an educational technology company was to provide products that consistently meet new educational standards, a project objective might be: “Successfully launch version 2.0 of our early learning app in time for the national curriculum conference.”

Step 3: Add key results

Next, write at least three key results for your objective next to “KR1,” “KR2,” and “KR3.” (You may add up to five key results for each objective, but only three are required for this activity.)

Each key result should address the following questions:

  • Does the key result help define success for your team?
  • Can it be measured to prove that you’ve achieved your objective?
  • Is it specific and time-bound?
  • Is it ambitious yet realistic?

Your key results should build on the scenario and additional project information, but it’s up to you to determine your success criteria. As an example, let’s return to the objective, “Successfully launch version 2.0 of our early learning app.” If you knew that a successful launch meant getting new users to download the app, you could create any of the following key results for the objective: 

  • 15,000 new downloads within first quarter post launch
  • 75,000 new downloads within first year post launch
  • 25% of monthly downloads from new customers

Remember: OKRs are never set in stone–they can and should be revised as you make progress, so it’s okay if you need to adjust your key results later on.

Step 4: Write 1-3 more OKRs

Repeat steps 2 and 3 for a second, third and fourth objective to fill up the template.

Pro Tip: Save the template

Finally, be sure to save a blank copy of the OKR template you used to complete this activity. You can use it for further practice or in your own personal or professional projects. These templates will be useful as you put together a portfolio of project management artifacts. You can use them to work through your thought processes as you demonstrate your experience to potential employers.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following criteria in your completed OKR card:

  • The objective defines what needs to be achieved and describes a desired outcome
  • The key results are ambitious, specific, measurable, and define success for the objective
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 2: Test your knowledge: Identifying project goals

Q1. Which three  s should you ask yourself to make a goal specific?

  • Who is involved?
  • Where should it be delivered?
  • What do I want to accomplish?
  • Can it be reasonably reached?

Q2. Which of the following is an example of a measurable goal? Select all that apply. 

  • Achieve a 20% improvement in customer satisfaction ratings based on post-support survey results
  • Increase product revenue by 5%
  • Reduce employee turnover
  • Increase market reach

Q3. What’s a strategy to determine if a goal is attainable?

  • Break down the goal into smaller parts
  • Hire a goal-setting coach
  • Post the goal on a project management forum for feedback
  • Ask the stakeholders

Q4. What can you do to determine if a goal is relevant?

  • Compare it to the project goals of the organization’s three closest competitors.
  • Consider if the goal matches the organization’s other needs and priorities.
  • Ask a project manager on another team.
  • Compare it to goals the organization set in previous years. 

Q5. Which of the following are examples of key results? Select all that apply.

  • Increase the number of website visitors by 25%
  • Implement online ordering
  • Launch a website redesign
  • Successfully process 50 online orders

Q6. Which of the following are objectives and key results (OKRs) development best practices? Select all that apply.

  • Key results should be tactical and specific.
  • OKRs are a resource that should be linked to the project plan.
  • Each key result should have 2-3 objectives
  • Objectives should be motivational and inspiring.

Quiz 3: Test your knowledge: Defining project scope

Q1. Which of the following best describes the difference between in-scope and out-of-scope?

  • Items within the project boundaries that are contributing to the project’s overall goal and items that are not
  • Goals you believe your team needs to meet and goals the stakeholders believe the team needs to meet
  • Problems the project manager can easily recognize and problems the project managers cannot recognize
  • Tasks you believe your team should complete first and tasks the team believes they should complete first

Q2. Which of the following best describes scope creep?

  • Cancelling a project after it has begun
  • Changing a project before it begins
  • Changing a project after it begins
  • Adding members to a project team

Q3. What are some tactics to handle external scope creep? Select all that apply.

  • Suggest alternative solutions to your customer’s or stakeholder’s proposed changes.
  • Define the project’s requirements.
  • Tell team members to ignore outside requests that will add project tasks.
  • Limit communication outside the team once the project begins

Q4. A designer on your project team suggests making changes to the product’s logo just prior to launch. What’s a strategy that could help avoid this internal scope creep? 

  • Assign some of the designer’s tasks to someone else so they can begin working on the logo changes.
  • Remind the designer about the project’s scope and the effects of internal scope creep.
  • Push back the product’s launch date to allow time for the design to implement changes to the logo.
  • Have the designer begin to implement the logo design changes immediately.

Quiz 4: Reflection: Applying the Triple Constraint

Q1. In this quiz, you will practice applying the Triple Constraint (budget, time, scope) to the following project scenario: 

Imagine you are a User Experience (UX) Program Manager at a small design agency. You are asked to manage an 8-week project for $800,000 USD. The project includes conducting field research and synthesizing results. As the final deliverable, your agency will create a research report and facilitate a 3-day workshop. You need to align with the client’s Vice President (VP) of Design, Ria. Luckily, you have a team of five teammates to work on this project together!

For the three situations below, describe how you would apply the Triple Constraint model. Provide examples to help illustrate your explanations. Are you ready?

I’m ready!

Q2. Situation 1

During the scoping of this project, Ria says her budget maxes out at $650,000 USDshe can’t afford the $800,000 USD that this project will cost. What are some proposals you can provide to Ria to reduce the budget? Think of the Triple Constraint and remember that one constraint will always have the priority. So if the budget is a constraint, what areas might Ria adjust to reduce project costs? Write 2-3 sentences.

During the scoping of this project, Ria says her budget maxes out at $650,000 USDshe can’t afford the $800,000 USD that this project will cost. What are some proposals you can provide to Ria to reduce the budget? Think of the Triple Constraint and remember that one constraint will always have the priority. So if the budget is a constraint, what areas might Ria adjust to reduce project costs? Write 2-3 sentences.

Q3. Situation 2

Recruiting for field research will take a week longer than expected. However, Ria told you that the project end date is a hard deadline. What can you do? Think of the triple constraint and remember that one of them will always have the priority. So if time is a constraint, what areas might Ria adjust to reduce the time in the project? Write 2-3 sentences

Recruiting for field research will take a week longer than expected. However, Ria told you that the project end date is a hard deadline. What can you do? Think of the triple constraint and remember that one of them will always have the priority. So if time is a constraint, what areas might Ria adjust to reduce the time in the project? Write 2-3 sentences

Q4. Situation 3

After the stakeholders agree on the project scope, Ria finds out that her CEO wants more information in the research report. She asks you to include details on the market opportunities for new product ideas, technical constraints, and design considerations. How do you manage this additional scope? Write 2-3 sentences.

After the stakeholders agree on the project scope, Ria finds out that her CEO wants more information in the research report. She asks you to include details on the market opportunities for new product ideas, technical constraints, and design considerations. How do you manage this additional scope? Write 2-3 sentences.

Q5. As a reminder, if there are changes in time, budget, and scope, remember to notify your project sponsor and key stakeholder and make sure they’re aligned. In this specific example, you should notify the internal stakeholders, so that they can make decisions about what to do about the changes in the project, while considering the Triple Constraint.

  • Alright

Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Weekly Challenge 2 Answers

Q1. As a project manager, you’re using the SMART criteria to craft goals for your team. During the process, you ask yourself if a goal is aligned to the organization or the company’s goals. Which SMART criteria does this   represent?

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Relevant
  • Time-bound
  • Attainable

Q2. Which of the following scenarios best represents a project that is going out-of-scope?

  • The manufacturer of one of the project deliverables just lost power after a large storm. They don’t expect to be in production for one week, delaying the project timeline.
  • During the project weekly meeting, the project sponsor adds a new deliverable requirement that costs $10,000 USD. This addition surpasses the budget by $5,000 USD.
  • During the project weekly meeting, the project manager learns the main vendor will increase the cost of raw materials by 20% due to an international shortage.
  • The deliverable to present your project’s pre-launch event at a three-day, in-person conference is now an online conference. The switch reduces the costs associated with event space, travel, and people resource time.

Q3. Consider the following scenario:

A new company project isn’t going well. The company hires outside evaluators to review the project. The evaluators tell the company that its plan has too many delays and that the company won’t be able to complete the project on time. They also identify one issue causing a delay is the company and the investors (stakeholders) have different expectations of what the completed project should be.

What step could the company have taken to avoid scope creep?

  • Have stakeholder involvement before the project begins.
  • Hire a different organization to review the project.
  • Make the investors adopt the company’s project expectations.
  • Require more detailed bids from the evaluators in writing.

Q4. Fill in the blank: The difference between a goal and a deliverable is that the goal is the desired outcome of the project and the deliverable is a _____ of the project.

  • tangible outcome
  • progress
  • success criteria
  • SMART method

Q5. Once a team launches a project, there’s still work to be done. Which of the following scenarios would occur in the landing phase? Select all that apply.

  • Gather the project team to discuss what they learned during the project and how to improve the process.
  • Work with stakeholders on the prioritization and documentation before building a new product.
  • Decide how to deliver an organization-wide announcement and campaign for the project.
  • Check that forms and processes are collecting the necessary data to evaluate project success.

Q6. Consider the following scenario: The Director of Product requests the project manager to add a new product feature. However, they also state that the team cannot push back the project delivery date.

Using the triple constraint model, what trade-off could the project manager use to meet the Director of Product’s request?

  • Change the team
  • Change the project goal
  • Change the timeline
  • Change the budget

Q7. Which two of the following are examples of success criteria?

  • Meet company-wide objective of $50M in revenues.
  • Deliver training to all appropriate teams to ensure at least 98% of the teams are using the new tool.
  • Create a new product feature that will satisfy customers.
  • Implement a training service to meet company objectives.

Q8. Which of the following is an adoption metric?

  • A 20% increase in the amount of tasks completed.
  • A 35% increase in first-time customers.
  • An increase in customer satisfaction score.
  • Double the amount of time participating within an app.

Q9. How will you quantify if you’re landing a project at its intended goal?

  • Send out feedback surveys to team members
  • Check if the project meets the initial success criteria
  • Ask the clients if they’re happy with the result
  • Solicit stakeholders for their opinions

Q10. Suppose as a project manager you’re receiving requests from stakeholders to add new features to the product you’re developing. How would you deal with this external scope creep?

  • Implement the initial stakeholders requests and then ban all future requests.
  • Agree on who can make formal requests and how your team will evaluate and act on those requests.
  • Ignore the requests because the project is already underway.
  • Take a team vote to decide if the team should add the new feature to the product.

Q11. Fill in the blank: Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) combine both a goal and a _______ to determine a measurable outcome.

  • consensus
  • metric
  • budget
  • vision

Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Week 3 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Activity: Complete a stakeholder analysis and power grid

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity you will complete a stakeholder analysis and power grid.

As a project manager, it’s important to understand how each stakeholder relates to your project. Completing a stakeholder analysis and power grid allows you to determine each stakeholder’s influence and potential impact on a project, which is crucial to managing communications and expectations.

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step instructions.

You are the project manager at Office Green, a commercial landscaping company that specializes in plants and greenery for offices and other businesses. The company is getting ready to introduce its new Plant Pals service, and you will manage the launch. You and your team need to maintain trust and generate buy-in from your stakeholders. Some of your stakeholders include:

  • Director of Product: The Director of Product is the project sponsor. As the sponsor, they fully support the project, sign off on high-level decisions, and sometimes act as a resource for the team. They are deeply invested in the outcome of the project, but less involved with its day-to-day operations.
  • Landscape Designer/Web Designer: This person has two roles at Office Green, and within the Plant Pals project. In addition to their web design skills and knowledge of plants, they have strong relationships with a range of people across the company. The Plant Pals project could affect their role as Landscape Designer if it results in a pivot toward new services. If they don’t want their role to change, it could be harder to get their buy-in.
  • Existing clients and their employees: The core customers for this product launch are Office Green’s existing clients and their employees. Their feedback can help Office Green improve the customer experience for the new service. Depending on their needs, some clients will be very interested in Plant Pals, while others will be less so. Lower-interest clients are unlikely to resist the project unless it impacts the existing product line.
  • Office Green’s investors: The investors support Office Green financially, so the company wants to keep them happy. Likewise, because Office Green’s performance affects their investments, the investors want Plant Pals to succeed. However, they will not be directly involved in the project and it will not affect them before launch. They are therefore unlikely to oppose the project at this stage.
  • Office Green’s receptionist: The receptionist will not be directly involved with the Plant Pals project. They will need to answer customer questions about the service later on, but don’t need to know many details until closer to launch. They have no major concerns about the project at this stage.
Step-By-Step Instructions

Part 1 – Understanding stakeholders with a stakeholder analysis

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Stakeholder analysis and power grid

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Stakeholder analysis and power gridPPTX FileDownload file

Step 2: Identify stakeholders

Start with the Understanding Stakeholders table on the first slide of the template. This is where you will organize your information. First, identify the stakeholders from the Office Green scenario (e.g., Director of Product, Landscape Designer/Web Designer, etc.) and write their titles in the Stakeholder column of the table. 

Step 3: Determine stakeholder roles

What roles do your stakeholders play in the project? Write down each team member’s role in the Role column. Select from the following options when determining project roles:

  • Project sponsor
  • Project team member
  • Office Green employee
  • Office Green customer 
  • Secondary stakeholder

Step 4: Determine stakeholder involvement 

How will each stakeholder participate in the project? What resources do they have that can help project success? Consider each stakeholder’s involvement in the project, as well as any tools (software, hardware, etc.), knowledge, or relationships that could be helpful. Make note of these activities and assets in the Involvement column.

Step 5: Determine the impact on your stakeholders

How will the project outcomes affect the needs of each stakeholder? Do you expect any resistance that could affect their buy-in? Record this information in the Impact column. 

Step 6: Determine each stakeholder’s level of power or influence

How much influence does each stakeholder have over the project? Consider the information you added to the Involvement and Impact columns. Then record each stakeholder’s level of power or influence as high (H), medium (M), or low (L) in the Power or Influence column. 

Note: You should gauge each stakeholder’s level of influence on this project, not within Office Green in general.

Step 7: Determine each stakeholder’s level of interest

How involved is each stakeholder in the project on a daily basis? How much will the project impact the needs of each stakeholder? Estimate each stakeholder’s level of interest in the project at this stage, considering your notes from the Involvement and Impact columns. Then indicate high (H), medium (M), or low (L) in the Interest column. 

Be sure to consider interest in project outcomes and interest in day-to-day operations. If a stakeholder is interested in both, their overall interest level is likely high. If neither, their interest could be low. If they are interested in one, but not the other, a medium rating might be appropriate.

Leave the Engagement column blank for now. You will return to it once you have completed the power grid.

Part 2 – Prioritizing stakeholders in a power grid

Step 1: Place stakeholders in the power grid

Now go to the second slide of the template: Prioritizing Stakeholders (power grid). Consider your power or influence ratings from the stakeholder analysis. Then drag the box containing each stakeholder’s name to the appropriate place in the power grid.

High-interest, high-power stakeholders should go toward the upper-right corner. Low-interest, low-power stakeholders go toward the lower-left corner, and so forth. You can place stakeholders anywhere on the power grid—even between quadrants. For example, a stakeholder with a medium level of interest would straddle the high and low interest quadrants. 

Note: Consult slides 3-5 for a demonstration of how to place your stakeholders.

Step 2: Determine how to engage with stakeholders

Now that you’ve placed your stakeholders in the grid, go back to the Engagement column in the stakeholder analysis table. Think about where each stakeholder falls in the grid: monitor, show consideration, keep satisfied, or manage closely. 

Based on this information, determine how often you should communicate with each stakeholder and what form that communication should take (e.g. semi-regular consultations, frequent updates, etc.). Depending on their role or resources, you might communicate with them daily, regularly, or rarely. Record your answers in the Engagement column.

Pro Tip: Save the Template

Finally, be sure to save a blank copy of the stakeholder analysis and power grid template you used to complete this activity. You can use it for further practice or in your own personal or professional projects. Templates like this one will be useful as you put together a portfolio of project management artifacts. You can use them to talk through your thought processes as you demonstrate your experience to potential employers.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following criteria in your completed stakeholder analysis table:

  • The table includes all five stakeholders and groups from the scenario.
  • The table lists information on each stakeholder’s role, resources, potential resistance, and engagement.
  • The table lists each stakeholder’s level of power or influence as low, medium, or high.
  • The table lists each stakeholder’s level of interest as low, medium, or high.

Be sure to address the following criteria in your completed power grid:

  • The grid contains all the stakeholders from your stakeholder analysis. 
  • The position of each stakeholder corresponds to their level of interest and influence in your stakeholder analysis.
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 2: Test your knowledge: Evaluating stakeholders

Q1. Imagine you are a project manager for a healthcare company. When building a team for a new research project, you create a power grid to help you figure out which stakeholders to prioritize. Which box in the grid represents the stakeholders who are the key players on your team?

Stakeholder Analysis grid with Power and Interest on each axis.
Stakeholder Analysis grid with Power and Interest on each axis. Box A in upper left (high power, low interest); Box B in the upper right (high power, high interest); Box C in the lower left (low power, low interest); Box D in the lower right (low power, high interest)
  • Box C (low influence, low interest)
  • Box B (high influence, high interest)
  • Box A (high influence, low interest)
  • Box D (low influence, high interest)

Q2. What is the correct order of tasks in a stakeholder analysis?

  • Determine each stakeholder’s level of interest and influence, list all the stakeholders the project impacts, and find ways to involve them.
  • List all the stakeholders the project impacts, determine their level of interest and influence, and find ways to involve them.
  • List all the stakeholders the project impacts, find ways to involve them, and determine their level of interest and influence. 
  • Find ways to involve each stakeholder, list all the stakeholders the project impacts, and determine their level of interest and influence.

Q3. What does stakeholder analysis enable project managers to do? Select all that apply.

  • Select more impactful projects
  • Accurately predict project outcomes
  • Avoid potential risks down the road
  • Build necessary partnerships

Q4. What is it called when a project manager involves stakeholders in decision-making to reach a broader consensus?

  • Stakeholder mapping
  • Stakeholder analysis
  • Stakeholder identification
  • Stakeholder buy-in

Quiz 3: Activity: Set project roles and responsibilities in a RACI chart

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will use a RACI chart to assign roles and responsibilities to project stakeholders. You will analyze a scenario and determine each stakeholder’s relationship to project tasks and deliverables.

As a reminder, RACI charts help you determine who is:

  • Responsible
  • Accountable
  • Consulted
  • Informed

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step instructions.

As the project manager for Plant Pals, you must assemble a team that can develop and execute the marketing and sales strategy to prepare for the launch. You must also assign roles and responsibilities for each of the project tasks and identify stakeholders impacted by the project. You’ve determined that the following people will be involved:

  • Director of Product: Oversees the product offerings, and serves as a resource for marketing and sales questions. Their knowledge of customer needs is vital to the project. 
  • Marketing Manager: Makes key decisions about the service launch and monitors task completion. They oversee all marketing efforts, including concept development, and sign off on the service launch plan. 
  • Marketing Coordinator: Creates the marketing strategy, including all marketing assets. They work closely with the Copywriter and report to the Marketing Manager. 
  • Copywriter: Produces all Plant Pals ad content, writes product descriptions, and creates promotional copy. They work with the Marketing Coordinator on all aspects of the marketing strategy and report to the Marketing Manager.
  • Head of Sales: Sets Office Green’s overall sales strategy and tracks the company’s progress towards its sales goals.. Their knowledge of customers’ buying behaviors can help the marketing team develop their campaign. The Head of Sales oversees the Sales Manager.
  • Sales Manager: Responsible for customer outreach and relationship management strategies, so that Office Green meets its sales goals. They need to understand the final marketing strategy and product offerings and convey that information to the Sales team. The Sales Manager reports to the Head of Sales.

To develop and execute the marketing strategy and sales, your team must complete the following tasks:

  1. Create a marketing plan for the new service
  2. Write promotional copy 
  3. Design marketing assets (e.g., flyers, brochures, and online advertisements)
  4. Create a customer outreach and onboarding plan
Step-By-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: RACI Chart

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ RACI chart – Phase 1XLSX FileDownload file

Step 2: Add tasks to the RACI chart

Add the four tasks from the scenario to your RACI chart template under the Task/Deliverable heading. Replace “Task/Deliverable” with the name of each task.

Step 3: Add team members to the RACI chart

Add your team members to the template. Replace “Role A” with “Director of Product,” and so on.

Step 4: Assign letters in the RACI chart

For each task, assign the letters R, A, C, and I to the team members involved. Consult the descriptions below to determine how your team members relate to the tasks:

Responsible: Who is responsible for completing this task? Consider these questions when determining who is responsible:

  • Which department manages the work?
  • Who should perform the work?

Accountable: Who is accountable if the task isn’t completed? Remember that only one person should be accountable for each task or deliverable. When deciding who is accountable, ask yourself: 

  • Who might delegate the task to another team member?
  • Who makes final decisions about the task?
  • Who should review the work to confirm it is complete?

Consulted: Who should be consulted for their insights, expertise, or strong opinions on the task? Here are a few questions to help identify whether someone should be consulted:

  • Who can give feedback to responsible individuals to help them complete tasks? 
  • Who are the subject matter experts (SMEs) for the task?

Informed: Who should be kept informed about task progress or project decisions? Key questions to ask yourself include: 

  • Who is invested in task completion but not directly involved in the work? 
  • Who is affected by the project outcome?

Note: The number of stakeholders you keep informed about each task can vary depending on your situation. In some cases, you might choose to inform all stakeholders who aren’t responsible, accountable, or consulted. In others, you could leave some cells in your RACI chart blank for certain tasks. Both approaches are fine for this activity.

Pro Tip: Save the template

Finally, be sure to save a blank copy of the RACI chart template you used to complete this activity. You can use it for further practice or in your own personal or professional projects. These templates will be useful as you put together a portfolio of project management artifacts. You can use them to work through your thought processes as you demonstrate your experience to potential employers.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following elements in your completed RACI chart:

  • The RACI chart includes all of the project roles from the scenario.
  • The RACI chart includes all the deliverables/tasks from the scenario. 
  • The appropriate individuals are Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, and Informed.
  • Only one individual is accountable for each task or deliverable.
  • At least one individual is responsible for each task. (Note: Some tasks may not need Consulted or Informed individuals.)
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 4: Activity: Assign project roles and responsibilities in a RACI chart

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive at least 80%, or 4 out of 5 points, by completing the activity and answering corresponding quiz questions. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will apply your knowledge of RACI charts to a new phase of project planning. You will analyze a scenario about the execution phase of the Plant Pals project. Then you will use a RACI chart to determine each stakeholder’s relationship to project tasks.

As a reminder, RACI charts help you determine who is:

  • Responsible
  • Accountable
  • Consulted
  • Informed

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step instructions.

As the lead project manager for the Plant Pals project, you’re managing the launch of this new service. Previously, you worked with your project team as they developed a marketing plan, wrote promotional copy, designed marketing assets, and created a sales plan for customer outreach.

Now you are gathering a new team to design and develop the Plant Pals landing page. When potential customers click on Plant Pals advertisements, the landing page is the first part of the Office Green website they will see. The team members you need to build the landing page include:

  • Web Manager: Makes final decisions about new site features and content changes. They sign off on the landing page design and launch plans. They also coordinate maintenance and management tasks to keep the page operating smoothly. 
  • Graphic Designer: Creates and chooses images and typefaces for the landing page and submits them to the Web Designer for approval. They also provide feedback on the landing page design and mockup. 
  • Web Developer: Supports the product team by writing the code that powers the site. They give feedback to the Web Designer on the landing page mockup. The Web Developer also helps set quality standards for the project.
  • Quality Assurance Tester: Reviews system specifications and runs quality tests for the new landing page. They run test scripts and review results, create reports, and document technical issues. These tests identify problems that the team can then resolve before launch. 
  • Content Writer: Creates the written content that explains how Plant Pals works and helps potential customers sign up for the service. They give feedback to the Web Designer on the landing page mockup.
  • Web Designer: Creates the landing page design, determining how the page looks and how customers interact with it. The Web Designer connects the creative and technical elements of the project, ensuring that the website is both attractive and functional. They report to the Web Manager, who makes final decisions on new site features.

To build and launch a landing page for Plant Pals, the team needs to accomplish the following tasks:

  1. Design a landing page 
  2. Create a landing page mockup
  3. Design image assets
  4. Write content
  5. Code the landing page
  6. Test the landing page
Step-by-step instructions:

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: RACI Chart

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the exemplar directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ RACI Chart – Phase 2XLSX FileDownload file

Step 2: Add tasks to the RACI chart

Add the six tasks from the scenario to your RACI chart template under the Task/Deliverable heading. Replace “Task/Deliverable” with the name of each task.

Step 3: Assign roles to the RACI chart

Update the Role headers with each team member role from the scenario. Replace “Role A” with “Web Manager,” and so on.

Step 4: Assign letters in the RACI chart

For each task, assign the letters R, A, C, and I to the team members involved. Consult the descriptions below to determine how your team members relate to the tasks:

Responsible: Who is responsible for completing this task? Consider these questions when determining who is responsible:

  • Which department manages the work?
  • Who should perform the work?

Accountable: Who is accountable if the task isn’t completed? Remember that only one person should be accountable for each task or deliverable. When deciding who is accountable, ask yourself: 

  • Who might delegate the task to another team member?
  • Who makes final decisions about the task?
  • Who should review the work to confirm it is complete?

Consulted: Who should be consulted for their insights, expertise, or strong opinions on the task? Here are a few questions to help identify whether someone should be consulted:

  • Who can give feedback to responsible individuals to help them complete tasks? 
  • Who are the subject matter experts (SMEs) for the task?

Informed: Who should be kept informed about task progress or project decisions? Key questions to ask yourself include: 

  • Who is invested in task completion but not directly involved in the work? 
  • Who is affected by the project outcome?

Note: The number of stakeholders you keep informed about each task can vary depending on your situation. In some cases, you might choose to inform all stakeholders who aren’t responsible, accountable, or consulted. In others, you could leave some cells in your RACI chart blank for certain tasks. Both approaches are fine for this activity.

Pro Tip: Save the Template

Finally, be sure to save a blank copy of the RACI chart template you used to complete this activity. You can use it for further practice or in your own personal or professional projects. Templates like this one will be useful as you put together a portfolio of project management artifacts. You can use them to talk through your thought processes as you demonstrate your experience to potential employers.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following elements in your completed RACI chart: 

  • The RACI chart includes all of the project roles.
  • The RACI chart includes all the tasks. 
  • The appropriate individuals are listed as Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, and Informed.
  • Only one individual is accountable for each deliverable/task.
  • At least one individual is responsible for each task. (Note that some tasks may not need Consulted or Informed individuals.)
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Q2. In the RACI model, which role completes the work for a task or deliverable?

  • Responsible
  • Accountable
  • Consulted
  • Informed

Q3. What key  s should you consider when deciding who should be informed about a task? Select all that apply.

  • Who is invested in task completion, but not directly involved in the work?
  • Who is affected by the outcome?
  • Which department manages the work?
  • Who are the subject matter experts (SMEs) for the task?

Q4. In your completed RACI chart, how many stakeholders are accountable for the “code the landing page” task?

  • 0
  • 1
  • 2 or more

Q5. In your completed RACI chart, who is responsible for coding the landing page?

  • The Graphic Designer
  • The Quality Assurance Tester
  • The Web Developer
  • The Web Designer

Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Weekly Challenge 3 answers

Q1. Which of the following responsibilities typically belong to the project manager? Select all that apply.

  • Develop the project management plan
  • Sign off on the budget
  • Direct project work and report on progress to stakeholders
  • Control change and monitor project quality

Q2. Does the project sponsor fund the project?

  • Yes. The project sponsor plays a vital leadership role, which always includes funding the project.
  • No. The project sponsor plays a vital leadership role but does not fund the project.
  • Sometimes. The project sponsor plays a vital leadership role, which sometimes includes funding the project.

Q3. Which of the following people are likely to be primary stakeholders in a project? Select all that apply.

  • The project sponsor
  • The project team
  • Business competitors
  • The project client

Q4. Which of the following are typical responsibilities of project team members? Select all that apply.

  • Provide technical expertise
  • Initiate the project
  • Carry out day-to-day project tasks
  • Take on multiple project tasks

Q5. What is the purpose of a stakeholder analysis?

  • Meet with stakeholders to make major project decisions
  • Identify stakeholders and determine their involvement in a project
  • Determine which stakeholders to exclude from a project
  • Talk to stakeholders and learn about their interests

Q6. Which of the following activities are steps in a stakeholder analysis? Select all that apply.

  • Determine which stakeholders should be excluded from the project
  • Assess each stakeholder’s reputation and level of experience
  • Assess each stakeholder’s level of interest and influence
  • List the stakeholders impacted by the project

Q7. What does the acronym RACI stand for?

  • Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, Informed
  • Responsible, Accountable, Considered, Informed
  • Responsible, Appeased, Consulted, Interested
  • Responsible, Accountable, Considered, Interested

Q8. Which of the following is true of someone who is accountable in a RACI chart?

  • Gives feedback according to their subject matter expertise
  • Ensures the work gets completed
  • Carries out the work to complete the tasks
  • Learns about tasks when they are complete

Q9. As a project manager, you make considerations when building a team. You decide how many people should be on the team, if they have the time to work on the project, and what expertise each team member needs for their tasks. What else should you consider when building a team?

  • Likelihood of project success
  • Team member motivation
  • Degree of project sponsor engagement
  • Whether the project has a strong business case

Q10. As a project manager, you’re prioritizing stakeholders with a power grid. One stakeholder has high power and low interest. What level of engagement should the team have with the stakeholder?

  • Monitor
  • Meet their needs
  • Show consideration
  • Manage closely

Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Week 4 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Test your knowledge: Evaluating tools

Q1. What are the main uses of scheduling and work management software? Select all that apply.

  • Easily assign tasks to multiple teammates
  • Help visualize a team’s project progress
  • Efficiently track progress on the team’s work
  • Quickly communicate with teammates and stakeholders

Q2. Which of the following are best practices when introducing a new tool to a team? Select all that apply.

  • Ensure the tool is functional after the team is introduced to it.
  • Discuss the tool early and often
  • If replacing a tool, allow for a transition period
  • Get feedback from stakeholders on important features that may help manage the project.

Q3. Fill in the blank: If a project has a _____, then it may be worth the team’s time to learn a more sophisticated tool.

  • large scope
  • short deadline
  • limited budget
  • small team

Q4. As a project manager, you need to determine how best to communicate with stakeholders across the company. Which tools are best for communicating?

  • Productivity tools
  • Work management software
  • Budgeting tools
  • Collaboration tools

Q5. Which three of the following best practices can help you choose tools for your project?

  • Understand a tool’s purpose.
  • Choose the same tools you used in your last project.
  • Know a tool’s capability.
  • Select tools based on your project’s scope

Quiz 2: Reflection: Project tools

Q1. For this exercise, you will read a scenario and describe tools you should use for the project. Start by reading the scenario:

As the project manager of a new project, you decide which scheduling, productivity, collaboration, and work management tools the team will use. For the project, you will have eight team members and four remote stakeholders. You expect the project to take around six months to complete. There are a dozen deliverables and over 100 tasks. 

Have you read the scenario?

  • I have!

Q2. List at least one scheduling tool to keep the project on track. In 1-2 sentences, describe how you can use the tool.

List at least one type of project management software—also called work management tools—to plan, track, and complete work. In 1-2 sentences, describe how you can use the tool.

Q3. List at least two productivity and collaboration tools to achieve tasks and better communicate with the team and stakeholders. In 1-2 sentences, describe how you can use each tool.

List at least one type of project management software—also called work management tools—to plan, track, and complete work. In 1-2 sentences, describe how you can use the tool.

Q4. List at least one type of project management software—also called work management tools—to plan, track, and complete work. In 1-2 sentences, describe how you can use the tool.

List at least one type of project management software—also called work management tools—to plan, track, and complete work. In 1-2 sentences, describe how you can use the tool.

Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project Weekly Challenge 4 answers

Q1. Fill in the blank: If the project has a _____, then it may be worth it for the team to learn a more sophisticated project management tool.

  • few deliverables
  • large scope
  • new project sponsor
  • short timeline

Q2. What details should be in your project charter? Select all that apply.

  • Project goals
  • Deliverables
  • Scope
  • Detailed project plan
  • Stakeholder analysis

Q3. Who does the project manager need to get approval from before indicating a Go for the project? Select all that apply.

  • Project team members
  • Vendors
  • Project sponsor
  • Key stakeholders

Q4. In which of the following scenarios does the project manager implement documentation well? Select all that apply.

  • A stakeholder talks with two different team members and receives conflicting information on a vendor. They cannot find information about the vendor in the shared document drive.
  • The key stakeholder determines they want to add a feature to the product in development. The project manager includes this update in the project charter and communicates it to the team.
  • Because the project manager doesn’t have all the project’s details, they ask a current team member to onboard the new team member.
  • The project manager shares the project timeline on a cloud-based document sharing program.

Q5. Email and chat are examples of what type of project management tool?

  • Scheduling
  • Collaboration
  • Work management
  • Progress visualization

Q6. The project manager needs to plan, track, and complete work across many project phases. They also need to visually represent the team’s day-to-day tasks. Which type of tool is best for these activities?

  • A presentation tool, such as Google Slides
  • A work management software, such as Asana
  • A collaboration tool, such as email
  • A productivity tool, such as Microsoft Word

Q7. The project sponsor requests a report on the current budget needs of a project. They would like to review a detailed breakdown of costs. Which type of tool would be best to use to meet the project sponsor’s request?

  • Spreadsheets
  • Chat
  • Visualization cards
  • Scheduling software

Q8. Collaboration tools such as email or chat allow teams to do what tasks? Select all that apply. 

  • Check in on project tasks
  • Plan the budget
  • Visualize project task completion
  • Work collectively and closely with other team members

Q9. Fill in the blank: _____ are items you need to help get the project done. They are considered project resources.

  • Materials
  • Reports
  • Status updates
  • Meetings

Q10. Fill in the blank: Since the project manager uses the project charter throughout the project, it acts like a _____ for the project.

  • main communication channel
  • compass
  • storage unit
  • bank
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