Project Planning: Putting It All Together Coursera Quiz Answers

All Weeks Project Planning: Putting It All Together Coursera Quiz Answers

This is the third course in the Google Project Management Certificate program. This course will explore how to map out a project in the second phase of the project life cycle: the project planning phase. You will examine the key components of a project plan, how to make accurate time estimates, and how to set milestones.

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Project Planning: Putting It All Together Week 1 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Reflection: Project planning considerations

Q1. In this exercise, you will read a scenario and answer questions about a project’s schedule, budget, and potential risks. Start by reading the scenario:

Imagine that you’re a project manager helping a restaurant owner launch an updated menu with a few new food items at 15 locations. The owner would like you to oversee the redesign of the menu and distribution to all locations. 

You’re preparing for your project’s eventual kickoff meeting. Right now, you’re thinking through the three main planning activities: building the schedule, assessing the budget, and considering potential risks. 

Have you read the scenario?

  • I have!

Q2. Write 2-3 sentences addressing what you should consider when forming the tentative project schedule.

You’re preparing for your project’s eventual kickoff meeting. Right now, you’re thinking through the three main planning activities: building the schedule, assessing the budget, and considering potential risks. 

Q3. Write 2-3 sentences about what you should consider when creating a project budget.

You’re preparing for your project’s eventual kickoff meeting. Right now, you’re thinking through the three main planning activities: building the schedule, assessing the budget, and considering potential risks. 

Q4. Write 2-3 sentences on what you should consider when listing potential risks.

You’re preparing for your project’s eventual kickoff meeting. Right now, you’re thinking through the three main planning activities: building the schedule, assessing the budget, and considering potential risks. 

Quiz 2: Test your knowledge: The planning phase components

Q1. Which three of the following are benefits of project planning?

  • It helps you map out the full project.
  • It gives you time to identify and prepare for risks that could impact your project. 
  • It helps you brainstorm preliminary goals for the project.
  • It helps individuals assigned to your project become a strong team by working together.

Q2. What are three major project components that are worked out during the planning phase?

  • Schedule, budget, and risk management plan
  • Success criteria, stakeholders, and resources
  • Project tracking, quality management, and retrospectives 
  • Scope, goals, and deliverables

Q3. During the kickoff meeting, which agenda item involves discussing how the project came to be and why the project matters?

  • Roles
  • Collaboration
  • Background
  • Goals and scope

Q4. Which of the following are best practices when you are leading a kickoff meeting? Select all that apply.

  • Take your own thorough notes.
  • Share the agenda.
  • Follow up after the meeting. 
  • Set the right time.

Quiz 3: Activity: Use a WBS to create milestones and project tasks – Part 1

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will identify a project’s major milestones, break them into smaller tasks, and complete a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) brainstorm diagram. Then, in Part 2 of this activity, you will build on this scenario to complete a WBS spreadsheet.

Setting tasks and milestones gives you a clear understanding of the amount of work your project will require, so you can keep your project on track. Milestones also serve as great check-in points to highlight the project’s progress for your team and stakeholders.

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step instructions.

As a project manager for Office Green, your job includes working with the operations team to develop and implement an Operations and Training plan. Your team will use this plan for ongoing maintenance of the Plant Pals service. It will take six months to fully implement all protocols, including setting up operational tools, putting delivery processes in place, and training employees. The project will begin before the Plant Pals launch and extend beyond it.

The Operations team is responsible for managing the organization’s day-to-day business so that it continues to run smoothly. Operations provides resources to other departments, ensures consistency, and maintains the company’s profitability. The Chief Operations Officer (COO) typically leads the Operations team and works closely with other divisions, such as Sales, Client Services, Human Resources, Information Technology (IT), as well as the project manager. 

Developing the Operations and Training plan marks a new stage of the project, with its own set of goals and deliverables. After assessing the requirements for the plan you determine three major milestones:

  • Establish a plant delivery and logistics plan
  • Select and install supply chain management software and equipment
  • Develop and launch an employee training program

For each milestone, you divide the work into three separate tasks. Each task has its own owner, duration, and details. The tasks associated with your milestones include: 

  • Establish a plant delivery and logistics plan: Team members will need to source materials for packaging and hire delivery drivers. They are also responsible for calculating the delivery fees. 
  • Select and install supply chain software and equipment: Team members will supervise vendor setup of inventory management and fulfillment software. They must also supervise vendor installation of fulfillment equipment and determine internal safety protocols for the equipment.
  • Develop and launch an employee training program: Team members will need to develop training sessions, train employees to use the software and equipment, and monitor progress and improve training processes.
Step-by-step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: WBS Brainstorm Diagram

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ WBS Brainstorm DiagramPPTX FileDownload file

Step 2: Title your chart

Title your chart “Operations and Training Plan.” Giving your chart a descriptive title helps you focus on the project’s milestones and tasks.

Step 3: Add milestones

Record the three milestones from the scenario in the boxes labeled Milestone 1, Milestone 2, and Milestone 3

Step 4: Add tasks

Identify the tasks required to reach each milestone. Record three tasks for each milestone in the Task 1, Task 2, and Task 3 boxes. When you finish, you should have nine tasks in your brainstorm diagram—three for each milestone.

For example, one task that will help you reach the “establish a delivery plan” milestone is “hire delivery drivers.”

Note: In a more detailed WBS, you would break these tasks down into additional subtasks. For example, the “hire delivery drivers” task might include subtasks like: “writing a job ad,” “interviewing drivers,” and “onboarding new hires.” For now, you can record the tasks as they are described in the scenario.

Pro Tip: Save the template

Finally, be sure to save a blank copy of the WBS brainstorm diagram template you used to complete this activity. You can use it for further practice or in your own personal or professional projects. These templates will be useful as you put together a portfolio of project management artifacts. You can use them to work through your thought processes as you demonstrate your experience to potential employers.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following points in your completed WBS brainstorm diagram:

  • A descriptive title
  • Three different milestones
  • Nine tasks in total (three for each milestone)
Did you complete this activity?
  • Y​es
  • N​o

Quiz 4: Activity: Use a WBS to create milestones and project tasks – Part 2

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will identify a project’s major milestones, break them into smaller tasks, and complete a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) brainstorm diagram. Then, in Part 2 of this activity, you will build on this scenario to complete a WBS spreadsheet.

Setting tasks and milestones gives you a clear understanding of the amount of work your project will require, so you can keep your project on track. Milestones also serve as great check-in points to highlight the project’s progress for your team and stakeholders.

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step instructions.

As a project manager for Office Green, your job includes working with the operations team to develop and implement an Operations and Training plan. Your team will use this plan for ongoing maintenance of the Plant Pals service. It will take six months to fully implement all protocols, including setting up operational tools, putting delivery processes in place, and training employees. The project will begin before the Plant Pals launch and extend beyond it.

The Operations team is responsible for managing the organization’s day-to-day business so that it continues to run smoothly. Operations provides resources to other departments, ensures consistency, and maintains the company’s profitability. The Chief Operations Officer (COO) typically leads the Operations team and works closely with other divisions, such as Sales, Client Services, Human Resources, Information Technology (IT), as well as the project manager. 

Developing the Operations and Training plan marks a new stage of the project, with its own set of goals and deliverables. After assessing the requirements for the plan you determine three major milestones:

  • Establish a plant delivery and logistics plan
  • Select and install supply chain management software and equipment
  • Develop and launch an employee training program

For each milestone, you divide the work into three separate tasks. Each task has its own owner, duration, and details. The tasks associated with your milestones include: 

  • Establish a plant delivery and logistics plan: Team members will need to source materials for packaging and hire delivery drivers. They are also responsible for calculating the delivery fees. 
  • Select and install supply chain software and equipment: Team members will supervise vendor setup of inventory management and fulfillment software. They must also supervise vendor installation of fulfillment equipment and determine internal safety protocols for the equipment.
  • Develop and launch an employee training program: Team members will need to develop training sessions, train employees to use the software and equipment, and monitor progress and improve training processes.
Step-by-step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: WBS Brainstorm Diagram

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ WBS Brainstorm DiagramPPTX FileDownload file

Step 2: Title your chart

Title your chart “Operations and Training Plan.” Giving your chart a descriptive title helps you focus on the project’s milestones and tasks.

Step 3: Add milestones

Record the three milestones from the scenario in the boxes labeled Milestone 1, Milestone 2, and Milestone 3

Step 4: Add tasks

Identify the tasks required to reach each milestone. Record three tasks for each milestone in the Task 1, Task 2, and Task 3 boxes. When you finish, you should have nine tasks in your brainstorm diagram—three for each milestone.

For example, one task that will help you reach the “establish a delivery plan” milestone is “hire delivery drivers.”

Note: In a more detailed WBS, you would break these tasks down into additional subtasks. For example, the “hire delivery drivers” task might include subtasks like: “writing a job ad,” “interviewing drivers,” and “onboarding new hires.” For now, you can record the tasks as they are described in the scenario.

Pro Tip: Save the template

Finally, be sure to save a blank copy of the WBS brainstorm diagram template you used to complete this activity. You can use it for further practice or in your own personal or professional projects. These templates will be useful as you put together a portfolio of project management artifacts. You can use them to work through your thought processes as you demonstrate your experience to potential employers.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following points in your completed WBS brainstorm diagram:

  • A descriptive title
  • Three different milestones
  • Nine tasks in total (three for each milestone)
Did you complete this activity?
  • Y​es
  • N​o

Q2. How do your WBS diagram and spreadsheet help you to develop and launch the Operations and Training program for Plant Pals?

  • Let customers know what to expect from the new service
  • Lay out the project’s costs in detail, so you don’t exceed your budget
  • Help you recruit team members with the right skills for the project
  • Clarify the tasks the team needs to accomplish to achieve project milestones

Q3. Which team member did you assign to own the task, “supervise vendor installation of fulfillment equipment”? 

  • The HR Specialist
  • The Fulfillment Director
  • The Training Manager
  • The Financial Analyst

Q4. Which team member did you assign to own the task, “train employees to use the software and equipment”?

  • The Fulfillment Director
  • The Quality Assurance Tester
  • The HR Specialist
  • The Training Manager

Q5. Which of the following additional tasks are appropriate for the “establish a plant delivery and logistics plan” milestone? Select all that apply.

  • Set customer service protocols
  • Source a vendor for additional types of plants
  • Hire warehouse employees to pack shipments
  • Purchase delivery trucks

Project Planning: Putting It All Together Coursera Weekly Challenge 1 Answers

Q1. Generally, how long should the kick-off meeting last?

  • One full work day
  • Less than 20 minutes
  • About one hour
  • Two-hours, and extend if attendees have   questions

Q2. Which of the following are important to understand in the planning phase? Select all that apply.

  • Budgets
  • Risk management
  • Schedules
  • Customer feedback

Q3. Fill in the blank: After the stakeholders assign the project manager, the goals of the project have to be approved, as well as the scope of the project and its _____.

  • tools
  • manager
  • deliverables
  • vendors

Q4. Suppose as a project manager, you notice that a new government regulation may add additional tasks to the project. You bring your concern about this new regulation to the stakeholders for a discussion on how to mitigate its impacts. What component of the planning phase does this situation represent?

  • Schedule
  • Budget
  • Task management
  • Risk management

Q5. Suppose that as a project manager, you’re running a kick-off meeting. During the meeting, you give examples of tasks that you consider part of the project, and tasks you consider not part of the project. What agenda section does this represent?

  • Roles
  • Questions
  • Background
  • Goals and scope

Q6. Suppose as a project manager, you’re running a kick-off meeting. During the meeting, you present the shared project tools and documents. You also tell the team they will communicate through a team chatroom and will receive daily email updates. What agenda item does this represent?

  • Scope
  • Intended outcome
  • Project purpose
  • Collaboration

Q7. As a project manager, you’re explaining to your team the difference between a milestone and a task. How would you explain a task to the team?

  • Tasks are activities to finish in a set period of time that help reach a milestone.
  • Tasks are activities that have a flexible finish date because milestones often change.
  • Tasks are milestones with a flexible finish date.
  • Tasks are milestones that are shorter to complete.

Q8. What are the benefits of setting milestones? Select all that apply.

  • Breaking down information into milestones gives you a better idea of the amount of work that needs to be done.
  • Setting milestones helps you keep your project on track with clear deadlines for when to complete deliverables.
  • Setting milestones encourages you to take time away from the project for new ideas.
  • Setting milestones helps you to figure out if you need to adjust your scope, timelines, or resources to meet your goals.

Q9. As a project manager, what is your first step when setting milestones?

  • Have a team meeting
  • Review the project as a whole
  • Assign deadlines
  • Consider the needs of your stakeholders

Q10. What are two benefits of making a work breakdown structure (WBS)?

  • You can get a sense of each stakeholder’s workload.
  • You and your teammates can easily identify the tasks you assigned to each milestone.
  • You have a visualization tool that assists in assigning tasks.
  • You can assign tasks to two or more team members.

Project Planning: Putting It All Together Week 2 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Test your knowledge: Getting started with a project plan

Q1. Which of the following is true of project plans? Select all that apply.

  • They are a living artifact that serves as a roadmap for your team throughout the project.
  • Their central component is a project schedule.
  • They are a compilation of a project’s documents that the project team uses to carry out project activities. 
  • They contain an explanation of why a project may not meet its goals. 

Q2. What are the basic elements that make up a project plan?

  • Stakeholder information, project proposal, tools, and resources 
  • Time estimation, effort estimation, buffer, and sub-tasks
  • Tasks, milestones, people, documentation, and time
  • Initiation, planning, managing, and execution

Q3. As a project manager, you create a project plan. In the plan are tasks with clear descriptions, owners, and due dates. In which section of the project plan do these tasks reside?

  • Work breakdown structure (WBS)
  • Management plans
  • Budget
  • Scope and goals

Q4. As a project manager, you create a project plan. In the plan are documents that help keep a project organized and on track, particularly if a risk arises or a change occurs. In which section of the project plan are these documents linked?

  • Work breakdown structure (WBS)
  • Project scope and goals
  • Budget
  • Management plans

Quiz 2: Reflection: Time estimation

Q1. In this exercise you will read a scenario about time estimation, and then reflect upon how critical it is to a project’s success. Are you ready?

I’m ready!

Q2. Consider the following scenario: You are to oversee the project for a new text book release for the fall semester. You’ve done something similar before, so you feel confident speaking with the stakeholders, project sponsor, and faculty director. You assure them the project will meet the 6-month deadline.

Around three months into the project, you notice that your writers consistently miss the writing deadlines you assign. Then you learn that a printer upgrade may delay printing the text books. Unfortunately, you forgot to include this delay in your time estimation. Now you have to tell the stakeholders that the project may not launch in time for fall.

What might you do differently next time to improve the outcome of this situation? Write three to four sentences.

Around three months into the project, you notice that your writers consistently miss the writing deadlines you assign. Then you learn that a printer upgrade may delay printing the text books. Unfortunately, you forgot to include this delay in your time estimation. Now you have to tell the stakeholders that the project may not launch in time for fall.

Quiz 3: Test your knowledge: Utilizing tools to build a project plan

Q1. Gantt charts give project teams a visual representation of project tasks. What else do Gantt charts include?

  • Due dates, durations, and milestones
  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Stakeholder contact information and budget items
  • Resources, deliverables, and success metrics

Q2. What tool can a project manager use for organizing all aspects of a complex project?

  • Work management software
  • A digital document
  • A calendar
  • Email

Q3. Which project management tool uses cards to track and visualize task progress?

  • Smartsheet
  • A Gantt chart
  • A spreadsheet
  • A Kanban board

Q4. When creating cards for a Kanban board, which items should go on the front of the card? Select all that apply.

  • Blocked days
  • Title and unique identifier
  • Description of work
  • Who is assigned to the task

Project Planning: Putting It All Together Coursera Weekly Challenge 2 Answers

Q1. Which of the following are relevant project documents you should link to in your project plan? Select all that apply.

  • The organization chart that depicts everyone who works in the company with their contact information
  • RACI charts that define roles and responsibilities for individuals on a team
  • The project charter that defines the project and outlines project goal details
  • Daily review emails and messages between the stakeholders, project manager, and project team

Q2. Fill in the blank: Time estimation predicts the total amount of time required to complete a task, while the actual time it takes to complete a task _____.

  • shouldn’t change
  • is not relevant
  • depends on stakeholder input
  • may vary depending on overlooked potential risks

Q3. What is capacity in project management?

  • The total number of people involved in the project
  • The prediction of the amount of budget to be allocated to complete the project tasks.
  • The amount of work that people assigned to the project can reasonably complete in a set period of time
  • The estimated length of time it’ll take for the project team to complete project milestones

Q4. Which examples below demonstrate a project manager asking an open-ended? Select all that apply.

  • Can you have this web design proposal completed and back to me by close of business Friday?
  • What are the steps in your customer feedback review process and what factors do you include in your report of this review?
  • Will you be able to have the transportation plan for the launch of the new truck series to dealerships ready by next week?
  • What are the issues I need to be aware of regarding the current project timeline?

Q5. Tools like Gantt charts and Kanban boards help benefit team members in what three ways?

  • They can demonstrate how their individual tasks connect to other tasks in the project.
  • They can illustrate when they need to complete their individual tasks.
  • They provide clear context about work project details.
  • They can translate project contracts like the statement of work (SOW) into number and dollar amounts.

Q6. Imagine you’re a project manager helping a car company with a new vehicle launch. Your project goal is to ensure vehicle delivery to dealerships. To achieve this, you speak with stakeholders and subject matter experts to understand the granular details of the project. This information helps you know what steps to take to best achieve the project goal. This example includes which project plan best practice?

  • Achieve buy-in from your team members for your plan.
  • Carefully understand project deliverables, milestones, and tasks.
  • Recognize and plan for the inevitable.
  • Give yourself time to plan.

Q7. Which of the following is a best practice when estimating the project timeline? Select all that apply.

  • Be thorough during the planning process.
  • Work quickly through the planning process to get the project started.
  • Prove competency by trying to resolve timeline concerns without input.
  • Escalate any timeline concerns to stakeholders.

Q8. What is a strategy to overcome the planning fallacy?

  • Increase the budget
  • Add task buffers
  • Add additional teammates
  • Expand the project scope

Q9. When creating a critical path, what does a network diagram help visualize? Select all that apply.

  • Which skilled teammate can work on each task
  • The tasks that can be performed in parallel
  • The path of work from the start to the end of the project
  • Which non-essential tasks are not on the critical path

Q10. Fill in the blank: A Kanban board utilizes cards placed in columns to _____.

  • manage tasks
  • organize documents
  • set the timeline
  • estimate the budget

Project Planning: Putting It All Together Week 3 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Test your knowledge: Understanding project budgets

Q1. Fill in the blank: Creating a _____ establishes a cost estimate for your project budget and ensures that you calculate the correct expenses for a set period of time.

  • forecast
  • reserve analysis
  • cost of quality
  • contingency budget

Q2. As a project manager, you determine the cost for items such as software, tools, labor, and equipment. What budgeting term refers to these types of costs?

  • Resource cost rates
  • Contingency budget
  • Reserve analysis
  • Cost of quality

Q3. Which of the following strategies should you consider when creating your budget? Select all that apply.

  • Time-phase your budget
  • Document all costs
  • Disregard historical data
  • Baseline your budget

Q4. Which three of the following items are examples of direct costs for your project?

  • General office equipment
  • Materials costs
  • Staff training
  • Utilities
  • Wages and salaries of employees and contractors 

Quiz 2: Activity: Develop a project budget

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will create a project budget to estimate the total cost for developing and implementing an Operations and Training Plan. Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar so you can compare your work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then follow the step-by-step instructions.

As project manager for Office Green, your job includes working with the operations team to develop and implement an Operations and Training plan for the Plant Pals service. In addition to identifying the major milestones and associated tasks for this plan, you also need to estimate the costs and create a budget.

You will use this budget as a baseline throughout the project, but you should monitor spending throughout the project and make adjustments as needed.

The estimated costs of the milestones and their subtasks are as follows:

Milestone 1: Establish a plant delivery and logistics plan.

  • Task 1: Purchase delivery trucks. Purchase two delivery trucks at a cost of $15,000 per truck.
  • Task 2: Source packaging materials. Purchase 1,500 boxes at a cost of $2 per box. 
  • Task 3: Pay delivery drivers. Pay two delivery drivers for ten days (assume eight-hour work days) at a rate of $15 per hour.

Milestone 2: Select and install supply chain management software and equipment.

  • Task 1: Source vendor (includes setup, installation, and deployment of software and equipment systems): Fixed cost of $15,000.

Milestone 3: Develop and launch an employee training program.

  • Task 1: Develop training sessions. Pay the HR specialist $50 per hour for ten days (assume eight-hour workdays).
  • Task 2: Train employees to use the software and equipment. Pay the Training Manager $25 per hour for ten days (assume eight-hour workdays).
  • Task 3: Monitor employee progress and improve training processes. Pay the Training Manager $25 per hour for another ten days (assume eight-hour workdays).

Your estimated budget to reach these milestones is $62,000. This amount includes a reserve buffer of $3,600 to account for unexpected costs. You should generally allow for a buffer of at least 5%.

Step-By-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Project budget

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Project budgetXLSX FileDownload file

Step 2: Add milestones and tasks

Fill in the project milestones and tasks under Milestones & Tasks. Be sure to group each task with its associated milestone. When you’re finished, your budget should include three milestones and seven tasks. We’ve filled in the first milestone and task for you.

Step 3: List project employees

For each task associated with particular employees, enter the employee who should be paid for that task under Employee Details. Some tasks may not have any associated employees, while others could have two or more (e.g., two delivery drivers).

Note: Your spreadsheet should include the pay rates for hourly employees, like the delivery drivers. You should only list salaried employees when they work extra hours on special projects included in the scenario (e.g., the HR Specialist developing the training sessions).

Step 4: List employee hours and rates

Next, calculate the number of hours each employee will spend on each task. Enter this number under Hours. Now list each employee’s hourly pay rate under Rate. Note that the spreadsheet calculates the total cost for you.

Step 5: Enter material quantities and costs

Now review the scenario for any materials you need to purchase (e.g., trucks, boxes):

  • For materials priced per unit, enter the amount needed under Units. Then record the cost per unit under $/Unit
  • For fixed-cost materials, record the price under Fixed Cost.
Pro Tip: Save the template

Finally, be sure to save a blank copy of the project budget template you used to complete this activity. You can use it for further practice or in your own personal or professional projects. These templates will be useful as you put together a portfolio of project management artifacts. You can use them to talk through your thought processes as you demonstrate your experience to potential employers.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following points in your completed budget:

  • Three milestones and seven tasks
  • Employees responsible for tasks
  • Employee hours and pay rates
  • Materials and costs
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 3: Test your knowledge: Creating a project budget

Q1. As a project manager setting a budget, you factor in unexpected costs that may arise during the project. What budgeting strategy does this refer to?

  • Bottom-up approach
  • Setting a baseline
  • Adding a buffer and reserves
  • Leveraging experts

Q2. As a project manager, what three things should you do to control costs and reduce changes to the budget?

  • Establish a sign-off plan and inform stakeholders of any expense changes that occur.
  • Request stakeholder approval on additional costs only after they are incurred
  • Manage changes as they’re made.
  • Ensure budget changes are within scope.

Q3. As a project manager, what does going under budget on a project indicate about your approach to budget management? Select all that apply.

  • That your initial estimates were inaccurate
  • That you could have spent more on the project to provide extra resources
  • That you accurately estimated the total cost of ownership (TCO) 
  • That you effectively conserved funds and will likely receive larger budgets for future projects

Q4. What budgeting challenge arises when changes or growth cause additional work the project manager hadn’t planned for?

  • Inaccurate budget baseline
  • Scope creep
  • Inaccurately accounting for total costs
  • Budget pre-allocation

Quiz 4: Test your knowledge: Introduction to procurement

Q1. As a project manager, you’re interested in working with vendors in a way that is collaborative and places an emphasis on relationships. What procurement management process should you choose?

  • Historical
  • Agile
  • Traditional
  • Flexible

Q2. As a project manager, you host weekly meetings to periodically review vendor performance and work quality. Which procurement process step does this represent?

  • Initiating
  • Selecting
  • Completing
  • Controlling

Q3. As a project manager selecting a vendor, you first need to outline the details and requirements of your project in order to solicit bids. Which procurement document helps with this task?

  • A request for proposal (RFP)
  • A Statement of Work (SOW)
  • A work breakdown structure (WBS)
  • A non-disclosure agreement (NDA)

Q4. As a project manager creating a statement of work (SOW), who do you ask for input and technical knowledge?

  • Subject matter expert (SME)
  • Project sponsor
  • Vendors
  • Key stakeholders

Quiz 5: Activity: Complete a Statement of Work (SoW)

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will apply what you have learned about procurement value to complete a Statement of Work (SoW). An SoW is a document that lays out the products and services a vendor or contractor will provide for the organization. It also describes what the contractor needs to perform the agreed-upon services. Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then follow the step-by-step instructions.

As part of the Plant Pals Operations and Training plan, you selected a vendor to install supply chain management software and equipment. In order to ensure the vendor can successfully set up the proper systems, you need to prepare a Statement of Work (SoW). 

For this engagement, the SoW should contain the following elements:

  • The vendor will configure inventory and fulfillment tracking software for the Office Green team. This includes auditing existing Office Green software and developing optimizations.
  • The vendor will also install the new software on all Office Green devices and equipment (laptops, mobile devices, and hard drives).
  • The vendor will install fulfillment equipment in Office Green’s warehouses.
  • The vendor will create training manuals and a maintenance guide for the software and equipment.
  • The vendor will meet with the Training Manager and the HR Specialist to explain the training manuals and answer questions. 
  • The vendor should complete all tasks within two weeks (10 business days).
  • The vendor is not responsible for training other employees or ongoing maintenance.
  • Office Green will pay the vendor once they have completed all of the work.
Step-By-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the exemplar for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Note: This template is an example intended to be used only for this exercise. It should not be relied on as a legal document.

Link to template: Statement of Work (SoW)

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Statement of Work (SoW)DOCX FileDownload file

Step 2: Title the document

First, write the project name in the page header and under the Office Green logo.

Step 3: Add important stakeholders

Record important stakeholders for the project under the project name. In this case, that includes the project lead (that’s you, the project manager) and the project sponsor (the Director of Product).

Note: You won’t fill in the Revision History until you’ve drafted the SoW and shared it with stakeholders. This is where you will log changes to the SoW, so don’t forget to include it.

Step 4: State the purpose

In the Purpose section, write a sentence or two explaining the desired outcomes for the SoW. Try to be as specific as possible about your goals for working with the vendor and how they relate to the larger aims of the Plant Pals project.

Step 5: Define the scope

Next, define the project scope. Enter the major activities the vendor will complete into the Scope section.

Step 6: Define out-of-scope activities

Record activities that are beyond the contract’s scope in the Out-of-scope activities section. Defining what’s out-of-scope sets expectations and minimizes potential confusion.

Step 7: Define deliverables

Describe the tangible and intangible outcomes of the vendor’s work in the Deliverables section. Make sure to be specific and consider the overall goals of the Plant Pals project.

Step 8: Add milestones

Consider the scenario carefully and break down the vendor’s work into at least three milestones. The milestones should define the major benchmarks the vendor must reach to complete the work. They are essential to tracking progress and should align with the in-scope activities. Write them in the Milestones section of the SoW.

Step 9: Estimate time to completion

Use the scenario above to estimate the approximate number of hours the work should take. Assume eight-hour work days and five-day work weeks.

For example, an assignment that lasts for 20 business days should take 160 hours to complete. Enter the number in the Estimated hours for completion section.

Step 10: Identify a due date

Select a date by which the vendor must complete all of the work. Calculate this date using the start date listed in the SoW header (April 12). 

Step 11: Set payment terms

It’s important for all parties to agree when the vendor will be paid for their work. Record the terms from the scenario in the Payment Terms section.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to include the following elements in your completed Statement of Work (SOW):

  • A purpose statement for the SoW
  • A list of in-scope items
  • A list of out-of-scope items
  • Expected deliverables
  • Major milestones
  • The estimated hours needed for completion
  • An estimated date of completion
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 6: Reflection: Procurement ethics

Q1. In this exercise you will read a scenario about ethical procurement, and then reflect upon how you’d avoid any potential ethical traps. Are you ready?

  • I’m ready!

Q2. As a project manager, you’re sourcing a new vendor. The vendor is located in a country that has a history of corruption in your industry. You’ve had a great initial discussion with the vendor and you don’t want to discriminate against it just because of the government’s and other companies’ history of unethical practices. In 2-3 sentences, describe the steps you should take to avoid any potential ethical traps.

As a project manager, you’re sourcing a new vendor. The vendor is located in a country that has a history of corruption in your industry. You’ve had a great initial discussion with the vendor and you don’t want to discriminate against it just because of the government’s and other companies’ history of unethical practices. In 2-3 sentences, describe the steps you should take to avoid any potential ethical traps.

Project Planning: Putting It All Together Coursera Weekly Challenge 3 Answers

Q1. When creating a budget, a project manager must do which of the following? Select all that apply.

  • Budget for surprise expenses
  • Review and reforecast throughout the project
  • Understand stakeholder needs
  • Approve budget increases

Q2. Which of the following is an example of using historical data to develop your project budget?

  • Getting quotes from potential vendors
  • Reviewing past projects that are similar to yours to get an idea of what your budget could entail
  • Thinking about all the parts of your project from the beginning to the end and adding the costs together
  • Reaching out to project managers who worked on past projects at the company

Q3. As a project manager creating a budget, you proactively identify factors that may impact expenses. You then take action to minimize the budgetary impact of these factors. What is this task called?

  • Cost control
  • Baselining the budget
  • Estimating cost
  • Bottom-up approach

Q4. As a project manager, you’re seeking a procurement approach that outlines clear workstreams, hard deadlines, and financially protects your project against unforeseen circumstances. Which procurement approach should you choose?

  • Robust
  • Traditional
  • Protectionist
  • Agile

Q5. Which section of the statement of work (SoW) includes details about what the service entails and may include major project activities?

  • Schedule overview
  • Scope
  • Target audience
  • Purpose

Q6. “Honesty, responsibility, respect, and fairness are the values . . .” begins what type of saying of the Project Management Institute that serves as a guide to how they do procurement and other business?

  • code of ethics
  • requirements
  • motto
  • slogan

Q7. To create a well-organized budget, a project manager includes different types of expenses. Which type of budget expense includes costs for day-to-day tasks within a company?

  • Operating expenses (OPEX)
  • Reserve expenses
  • Fixed expenses
  • Capital expenses (CAPEX)

Q8. At what phase in the procurement process would a project manager check a vendor’s reputation for delivering quality work, and make a site visit?

  • Selecting
  • Completing
  • Introducing
  • Controlling

Q9. When budgeting a project, you should consider additional expenses such as warranties, supplies, add-ons, and upgrades. Which budgeting term refers to this concept?

  • Baseline your project
  • Total cost of ownership
  • Bottom-up approach
  • Top-down approach

Q10. Fill in the blank: In project management, the budget is considered a _____—it is a success metric.

  • dependency
  • reserve
  • procurement
  • deliverable

Project Planning: Putting It All Together Week 4 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Test your knowledge: Risk management

Q1. Define a risk as it relates to project management.

  • A risk is a known problem that has already impacted a project.
  • A risk is a measurement that estimates the impact of known problems.
  • A risk is a measurement that estimates the potential impact of events that could occur in the future.
  • A risk is an event that might occur and could impact a project in the future.

Q2. What is the difference between a risk and an issue in project management?

  • An issue is a known problem; a risk is an event that might happen in the future
  • Risks and issues are both known problems, but they affect projects to different degrees.
  • Risks and issues are both events that might happen in the future, but they could affect projects to different degrees.
  • A risk is a known problem; an issue is an event that might happen in the future

Q3. Fill in the blank: Risk management is the process of _____.

  • identifying and mitigating risks and issues that are already impacting a project
  • identifying and initiating projects that have a low potential for risk
  • identifying and avoiding projects that have a high potential for risk
  • identifying and evaluating potential risks and issues that could impact a project

Q4. Which of the following are true of risk management? Select all that apply.

  • It is a one-time exercise at the start of a project.
  • It helps identify who a project manager should consult about a potential risk.
  • It helps determine how to mitigate potential risks.
  • It reveals what could go wrong with a project.

Quiz 2: Test your knowledge: Risk scenarios

Q1. Which three of the following scenarios represent possible opportunities that could arise from a risk?

  • Adopting a new spreadsheet software to streamline and simplify tasks in the future
  • Hiring a new supplier of an item required to complete a product shortly before the project closes
  • Completing a milestone ahead of schedule
  • Adding two team members from another team to increase productivity and meet the project deadline

Q2. Which of the following scenarios is an example of a project issue? Select all that apply.

  • Materials increase in price
  • Clients do not return the necessary paperwork on time
  • Team members complete tasks early
  • Workers at a supplier’s production are currently in a labor strike

Q3. Fill in the blank: The risk management process includes five steps: identify, analyze, evaluate, _____, and monitor and control.

  • accept
  • classify
  • mitigate
  • treat

Q4. During which phase of the risk management life cycle do you use the information you have gained about the likelihood and potential impact of risks to prioritize risks?

  • Treat the risk. 
  • Analyze the risk. 
  • Identify the risk.
  • Monitor and control the risk. 
  • Evaluate the risk. 

Quiz 3: Test your knowledge: Measuring risk impact

Q1. Which type of risk involves the possibility that a project will not produce the results outlined in the project goals?

  • Time risk
  • Scope risk
  • Environmental risk
  • Budget risk

Q2. Imagine you’re a project manager overseeing the development and launch of a new app. Which of the following problems could be a single point of failure risk in the app’s development?

  • Failing to back up key project documentation, which may result in a complete loss of essential data.
  • Receiving negative feedback from user testing, which may lead to more work for the developers.
  • Completing a project milestone behind schedule, which may delay the project timeline.
  • Lack of communication between the designers and the project lead, which may lead to tension among team members.

Q3. Continuing with the app-development project scenario from the previous  , which three of the following task relationships demonstrate an internal dependency?

  • Researchers must conduct usability tests before the team can improve the design.
  • Clients must sign off on the design before the official launch.
  • Designers must complete wireframes before they begin prototyping. 
  • Developers must fix bugs before the Quality Assurance team begins testing. 
  • Partner agencies must deliver image assets before the app is complete.

Q4. Continuing with the app-development project scenario from the previous  , you need to secure funding to develop the app. You want to write a grant proposal to an investment firm. Which of the following is an external dependency for this task?

  • Get feedback from the investment firm about the types of projects they are interested in funding.
  • Identify team members to write the sections of the proposal that align with their expertise.
  • Outline your project milestones in the proposal.
  • Appoint a team member to assemble the proposal.

Quiz 4: Test your knowledge: Identifying and assessing risks

Q1. Imagine that you’re overseeing a project to construct a new office building for your company, and you need to determine your task dependencies. Which of the following tasks should come first?

  • Get stakeholder input to determine project goals.
  • Identify the construction site.
  • Set the project budget.
  • Begin construction on the new building.

Q2. Continuing with the construction project scenario from the previous  , which of the following tasks should come last in the project? 

  • Plan for risk.
  • Move equipment to the new office.
  • Order the building materials.
  • Hire an architect.

Q3. Continuing with the construction project scenario from the previous  , imagine that you underestimated the amount of a particular material needed to complete the new building. You purchase more of the material at full cost, since you no longer qualify for the bulk, discounted rate. What risk does this scenario demonstrate?

  • Budget risk
  • Legal risk
  • Environmental risk
  • Time risk

Q4. Continuing with the construction project scenario from the previous  , the project team completes the designs (Task A) and then begins construction (Task B). What type of dependency describes the relationship between Tasks A and B?

  • Finish-to-Start (FS)
  • Finish-to-Finish (FF)
  • Start-to-Finish (SF)
  • Start-to-Start (SS)

Quiz 5: Test your knowledge: Mitigating and communicating risks

Q1. Imagine you have learned that a contractor who has done quality work for your organization in the past has received some negative reviews recently. You choose to hire another contractor for the current project. This is an example of mitigating risk by ______.

  • transferring it
  • reducing or controlling it
  • avoiding it
  • accepting it

Q2. Which of the following are basic components of a risk management plan? Select all that apply.

  • A risk register
  • Mitigation plans
  • A Gantt chart
  • A probability and impact matrix

Q3. Which of the following tools can help project managers visualize how to mitigate a risk in order to reduce or control it?

  • A power grid
  • A statement of work
  • A decision tree
  • A project charter

Q4. What step should you take after you complete your risk management plan?

  • Implement the individual mitigation plans for the risks you have identified.
  • Share the plan with your team and stakeholders.
  • Create a power grid to include in the appendix of your plan.
  • Estimate the likelihood and impact of the project risks you have prioritized.

Project Planning: Putting It All Together Coursera Weekly Challenge 4 Answers

Q1. Fill in the blank: A(n) _____ is a known and real problem that can affect a team’s ability to complete a task.

  • issue
  • drawback
  • threat
  • risk

Q2. Failing to engage in risk management for your project can have which two of the following consequences?

  • You will not be able to make necessary adjustments to the project plan
  • You will not be able to use the appropriate tools
  • You will not be able to meet project timelines and goals
  • You will not be able to establish necessary vendor relationships

Q3. When working through the risk management life cycle, what’s the main goal when evaluating a risk?

  • Controlling risks
  • Treating risks
  • Identifying risks
  • Prioritizing risks

Q4. Identify the steps involved in creating and utilizing a fishbone (or cause-and-effect) diagram.

  • Define the problem, identify risks, mitigate causes, and analyze the causes
  • Define the problem, identify categories, mitigate causes, and monitor feedback
  • Define the problem, identify categories, brainstorm causes, and analyze the causes
  • Define the problem, identify risks, brainstorm causes, and monitor feedback

Q5. Choose the best definition for inherent risk as it relates to project management.

  • The measure of a risk, calculated by its difficulty and frequency
  • The measure of a risk, calculated by its timing and dependencies
  • The measure of a risk, calculated by its probability and impact
  • The measure of a risk, calculated by its causes and circumstances

Q6. Which of the following risk types most commonly impact projects? Select all that apply.

  • Scope risks
  • Budget risks
  • Inherent risks
  • Time risks

Q7. Fill in the blank: The four common ways to mitigate risk include _____.

  • avoid it, accept it, reduce or control it, and transfer it
  • accept it, ignore it, reduce or control it, and transfer it
  • accept it, disregard it, reduce or control it, and transfer it
  • avoid it, accept it, disregard it, and transfer it

Q8. Which of the following is a recommended method to communicate a medium-level risk to stakeholders?

  • Present the risk and your mitigation plan during the team meeting next month.
  • Send stakeholders a direct email that outlines the risk and includes a detailed explanation of your mitigation plan.
  • In the weekly planning email, briefly describe the risk and your plan to mitigate it.
  • Call an urgent in-person meeting with stakeholders to present the risk and your plan to mitigate it.

Q9. As a project manager, you’re identifying task dependencies. Task B cannot start until Task A is complete. Which type of dependency does this situation represent?

  • Finish to Start (FS)
  • Finish to Finish (FF)
  • Start to Start (SS)
  • Start to Finish (SF)

Q10. Which of the following best describes the risk register in the risk management plan?

  • An introduction to the conditions of the project and an outline of the potential risks
  • A risk assessment technique such as the probability and impact matrix
  • A list of general information such as the plan’s status, creation date, and uploaded date
  • A description of each risk, its risk rating, and a mitigation plan

Project Planning: Putting It All Together Week 5 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Test your knowledge: Effective communication

Q1. Fill in the blank: Effective communication is clear, honest, relevant, and _____.

  • rare
  • one-sided
  • urgent
  • frequent

Q2. Imagine that a restaurant is hosting a recruitment day to hire delivery drivers. The project manager creates a plan to organize stakeholder communication. The plan indicates the following:

  • The team lead updates the core hiring team every day for two weeks prior to the event to report next steps so they each know their daily responsibilities.
  • The core hiring team contacts the job candidates the Friday before the event to remind them of the time and location.
  • The project manager contacts the venue and caterers the Monday before the event to confirm reservations. 

In the above scenario, what three key elements are missing from the communication plan?

  • Dependencies
  • Communication risks
  • Resource links
  • Type of communication
  • Delivery methods

Q3. Which of the following is a best practice you can use to help ensure that your communication plan is effective for your team? Select all that apply. 

  • Use formatting to highlight any key details. 
  • Test your plan
  • Add a column for notes. 
  • Share your plan with your manager but not your team.

Q4. How can you recognize individual differences in your communications? Select all that apply.

  • Be mindful of your own biases.
  • Use appropriate, professional, and neutral language.
  • Include and respect diverse points of view.
  • Craft your communications based on what you assume about your audience’s backgrounds, identities, or experiences. 

Quiz 2: Activity: Draft a communication plan

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive at least 80%, or 4 out of 5 points, by completing the activity and answering corresponding quiz questions. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will create a communication plan to help you manage all the different kinds of communication that happen during a project. Communication plans help you organize recipients, communication frequency, and the types of information you need to share.

Note: When you create a communication plan at the start of a project, don’t feel obligated to follow it exactly. Communications should be flexible enough to adapt if and when circumstances change.

Be sure to complete this activity before advancing to the next course item, which will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity. 

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step instructions.

As part of the Plant Pals Operations and Training plan, your team will need to organize and host training for employees. You want to make sure that a majority of employees are properly trained to use the new software and equipment before sending the first round of Plant Pals test batches to customers. Because your employees will need to learn several different processes, training sessions will take place over a period of ten days. Your team has just over three weeks to prepare before the sessions begin.

As the Plant Pals project manager, you will work with your team to plan and execute the preparations for the training sessions. One of your tasks is to build a communication plan, which should include:

  • What you need to communicate (the goal of the communication)
  • Who needs to communicate
  • When information-sharing needs to happen
  • Why and how to communicate with everyone involved

As you begin planning the training sessions, you identify the key teams and stakeholders who will need to communicate about the event:

Core Team: Your core project team will lead the planning and task coordination. These tasks include communicating with stakeholders, preparing the schedule, reserving space and equipment, training the employees, and more.

The team members who are directly involved in organizing the trainings include:

  • An Administrative Coordinator who is responsible for scheduling and communicating with other Office Green teams (e.g., Facilities)
  • A Human Resources Specialist who manages hiring and develops training protocols (with the help of the Training Manager)
  • A Training Manager who reports to the HR Specialist, runs the training program on the established protocols, and refines training processes

The other members of your core project team (the Financial Analyst, Fulfillment Director, Quality Assurance Tester, and Inventory Manager) will attend team meetings and are available to pitch in if you need them.

Additional stakeholders with whom your team needs to communicate include:

Software and Equipment Vendor: Members of your team will need to meet with the vendor to learn about the software and equipment so they can create an effective training plan for employees. The team members responsible for creating and running the training program should organize and attend this meeting. Your team should allow adequate time to learn about new processes and ask follow-up questions. This meeting must take place before the end of the vendor’s SoW.

Human Resources: The Human Resources department can help your team as they develop the training plan. They will also provide support during the training sessions. Your team will want to communicate with them regularly (but not daily) and on an as-needed basis. The HR Specialist on your team is the point of contact for the rest of HR.

Facilities: Facilities will reserve and manage the spaces and equipment needed for the training sessions. They will need to review the schedule and understand your needs for each session ahead of time. A member of your team needs to keep them updated and informed of any changes to requirements.

Print Shop: The vendor who will install the software and equipment is also creating training manuals for your team. One of your team members will need to coordinate with the print shop to make copies of the manuals for each training.

Office Green employees: You will also need to coordinate with the employees who need to be trained! A member of your team should tell them where they should arrive, where they should go, what they need to bring and communicate other necessary details. The same team member will also need to conduct the sessions and solicit feedback from employees through a post-training survey.

Your Office Green Manager: Your manager wants to be kept informed of your team’s progress but doesn’t need to know every detail. They can also be a helpful resource for the planning process, if necessary. You already communicate with them regularly, so you can update them at one of your weekly meetings. 

Senior Leadership: Your manager asks you to let senior leadership know about the outcome of the training (and to copy them when you do so). The Director of Operations and the Director of Product (the project sponsor) want to be kept informed but don’t have much time for meetings.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Communication plan

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Communication planXLSX FileDownload file

Step 2: Review the communication goals and recipients

The goal and recipient of each communication is already filled out in the template. Review this information and consider the people and teams you need to coordinate. Then try to think of some ways you can effectively communicate about each goal.

Note: The first line of the communication plan has already been filled in. You can reference this information as you complete the rest of the plan.

Step 3: Determine communication types

How should you communicate about each goal? What type of communication is best for each recipient? Select one of the following communication types from the drop-down under Type of Communication:

  • Planning Meetings: Standard meetings with team members or stakeholders to plan event details
  • Planning Check-In: Brief meetings with stakeholders and support staff to discuss action items or check on task progress
  • Training: Sessions for employees to learn about jobs or specialized tasks
  • Informational update: Key details, instructions, and resources for trainees
  • Status Update: Timely project updates for senior stakeholders to get high-level information, give feedback, and answer questions

Note: You can use drop-down items more than once. For example, you might want to build multiple planning check-ins into your schedule.

Step 4: Determine the frequency

How often do you need to communicate with each recipient? Consider each stakeholder’s level of involvement in the project when deciding how often to communicate. Select one of the following frequencies from the drop-downs under Frequency:

  • Daily
  • Weekly
  • One time

Note: You can treat these frequencies as approximate since you’ll be able make note of other communications (like day-of reminders) under the Key Dates column in Step 6.

Step 5: Add the sender or owner

Who from the team should share or communicate about this information? Select one of the following options from the drop-downs under Sender/Owner:

  • Project Manager (you)
  • Core Team: Administrative Coordinator
  • Core Team: HR Specialist
  • Core Team: Training Manager
  • Core Team: HR Specialist & Training Manager

Step 6: Add the key dates

When should this communication happen? Are there important reminders or deadlines you should note? Consider how much time you have to plan the event and when it makes sense to communicate about each goal (e.g., early or late in the day or the week). Enter your selected times under Key Dates.

There are no right answers here, but try to be specific about times and dates—and make sure your stakeholders don’t need to be in two places at once! 

Note: Your stakeholders’ schedules will vary, and it’s unlikely that they will all be able to make every scheduled meeting. Sometimes, you will need to decide whether you need to reschedule if a key team member can’t make it.

Step 7: Determine the delivery method

How will you or your team members share this information? Should you meet in person or over the phone? Should you send a personal email or is a group message more effective? Select your delivery methods from the drop-downs under Delivery Method

  • In person
  • Phone call
  • Email (from individual address)
  • Email (from company address)

Note: The best delivery method for each communication depends on the needs and preferences of particular stakeholders. For this exercise, you can use your best judgment. 

Step 8 (Optional): Add resources and notes

If you’d like, fill in the Resources and Notes columns. You can consult the scenario for any important details or come up with your own. 

For example, the template includes a link to the meeting agenda and notes for daily team meetings. These documents aren’t specifically mentioned in the scenario, but they’re useful for any project meeting.

You don’t need to complete both of these fields for every communication item. Instead, try to think about what kinds of resources or information can help you reach your communication goals. 

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following elements in your completed communication plan:

  • The types of communication you need to have with your recipient
  • The recipients you need to communicate with
  • How often you will communicate with them
  • Who will own the communication (you or someone from the team)
  • Key dates for communication
  • The delivery method for each type of communication
Did you complete this activity?
  • Y​es
  • N​o

Q2. Fill in the blank: In the communication plan you created, you scheduled _____ to keep your manager informed and get feedback. 

  • daily updates
  • w​eekly updates
  • a one-time meeting

Q3. In your communication plan, how often does your team communicate with Human Resources while developing the training plan?

  • Daily
  • One time
  • Weekly

Q4. In your communication plan, who is the Sender/Owner responsible for communicating the training schedules, locations, and other details to Office Green employees?

  • The Training Manager
  • You, the Project Manager
  • The Administrative Coordinator
  • The HR Specialist

Q5. In your communication plan, who coordinates with the Print Shop about printing the training manuals?

  • The Training Manager
  • The HR Specialist
  • You, the Project Manager
  • The Administrative Coordinator

Quiz 3: Activity: Organize documents in a project plan

Q1. To pass this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below. You can learn more about the graded and practice items in the Course Overview.

Activity Overview

Congratulations! You’ve come a long way and worked hard to complete all of the individual project planning documents, also known as project artifacts, in this course. In this activity, you will gather those documents and compile and organize them in one central place—your project plan. Having your documents in one place makes communication quicker, easier, and more streamlined, so everyone can find the information they need. 

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.   

Scenario

Review the scenario below. Then complete the step-by-step instructions.

As the project manager for Office Green’s Plant Pals Operations and Training plan launch, you want to keep all your planning documents organized in a central location. That way, you can easily share information and track the status of the project’s many moving pieces. Your project folders and labels should be clearly organized to provide visibility, continuity, and accountability.

A project plan is not only useful for streamlining team communications, it can also help you with retrospectives and planning for future projects.

Step-by-step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Project plan

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Project planXLSX FileDownload file

Step 2: Add project details

There are four tabs at the bottom of the template: Dashboard, Project Schedule, Budget, and Communication Plan. First, go to the Dashboard tab. You’ll use this tab to provide a brief overview of the project and link to key project documents. 

In the topmost section of the Dashboard, fill in the following information as indicated in the template:

  • Project name
  • Project description
  • Project owner (You can use your name, make up a name, or simply write “Project Manager.”)
  • Project status (mark the status as Draft for now)

Note: Leave the descriptions of the Key Docs blank for now. You will fill them in once you complete the rest of the document. 

Step 3: Gather project documents 

Next, gather your main project documents from the activities in this course: 

Optional: Gather your finished documents from the following activities in the previous course, Project Initiation: Starting a Successful Project:

  • Project charter 
  • RACI charts

Step 4: Add the documents to their respective tabs

Copy your completed Gantt chart, budget, and communication plan to the following tabs of your project plan:

  • The Gantt chart spreadsheet should become the Project Schedule tab.
  • The budget spreadsheet should become the Budget tab.
  • The communication plan spreadsheet should become the Communication Plan tab.

If you are using Google Sheets, we recommend using the Copy to > Existing spreadsheet function:

  1. Open both your project plan and your source sheet (the spreadsheet you want to copy—e.g., your Gantt chart).
  2. Copy your project plan URL.
  3. Go to your source sheet and find the tab at the bottom (e.g., for your Gantt chart, this is the tab labeled “Gantt chart”). 
  4. Click the down arrow on the tab and select Copy to > Existing spreadsheet.
  5. Paste the project plan URL into the bottom of the box that appears.
  6. Choose Select to copy the source sheet into your project plan.
  7. The copied sheet will appear as a new tab at the bottom of your project plan. You can then delete the blank tab (“Project schedule,” “Budget,” or “Communication plan”) and rename the newly copied tab.

For Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet software, you can drag a spreadsheet tab from one spreadsheet to another:

  1. Arrange your spreadsheets so that both your project plan and your source spreadsheet (e.g., your Gantt chart) are side-by-side. (You may need to resize them first.)
  2. Click the tab at the bottom of your source spreadsheet and drag it to the tab bar of your project plan.
  3. The copied sheet will appear as a new tab at the bottom of your project plan. You can then delete the blank tab (Project schedule, Budget, or Communication plan) and rename the newly copied tab.

You can also copy all the cells of the source spreadsheet and then paste the content into the relevant tab in your project plan. 

Step 5: Optional: Add hyperlinks to the Dashboard tab

Next, you can add hyperlinks to your project plan tabs and other documents to the Key Docs section of the Dashboard tab. Creating links to the main documents in your project plan lets your team access them quickly and easily.

Note: If your project documents are not in the cloud or online, you won’t be able to link to them, and are not expected to do this step.

If you’re using Google Drive, follow these steps to hyperlink your Project Schedule, Budget, and Communication Plan tabs to the Dashboard:

  1. Under Key Docs in the Dashboard tab, select the cell with the name of the document you want to link (e.g. “Schedule”).
  2. Go to Insert and select Link (or select the Insert link icon from the toolbar).
  3. Choose Sheets in this spreadsheet and select the name of the tab you want to hyperlink.
  4. Select Apply to link the tab.

To add hyperlinks to your Statement of Work, risk management plan, project charter, and RACI charts:

  1. Copy the URL for the document you want to link.
  2. Select the cell that matches the document you want to link (e.g., “Project charter”).
  3. Select Insert link and paste the URL.
  4. Select Apply to link the document. 

If you want to create a shared folder so you can link to all your files, create a central folder on Google Drive, or any other file sharing program (e.g., Microsoft, Dropbox or Mac). Then, add the documents to the shared folder and generate a hyperlink to the Key Docs section of the Dashboard

Step 6: Add descriptions

In the Dashboard tab, write a short description of each document under Description. (Do this even if you haven’t created hyperlinks to your project documents. Your descriptions should be brief, but specific, so your stakeholders know exactly what each document contains.

Note: Be sure to adjust the sharing settings for your project documents and folders. To learn how to change sharing settings in Google Drive, visit this resource.

Step 7: Save your project plan

Save your completed project plan to your computer or Google Drive. You’ll need it again in the next course, Project Execution: Running the Project.

Pro Tip: Save the template

Finally, be sure to save a blank copy of the project plan template you used to complete this activity. You can use it for further practice or in your own personal or professional projects. These templates will be useful as you put together a portfolio of project management artifacts. You can use them to talk through your thought processes as you demonstrate your experience to potential employers.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following elements in your completed project plan:

  • Project details at the top of your Dashboard tab
  • Links for all documents listed in the Dashboard
  • Tabs for the completed Gantt chart (Project Schedule), Budget, Communication Plan, and if applicable, RACI chart
  • A link to a shareable folder containing all of your project resources
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 4: Activity: Get started on your project management resume

Q1. This is an optional activity. To “pass” this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will start writing a professional resume that will position you for future project management roles. Getting a job in project management begins with a solid resume that highlights your skills and accomplishments. When complete, you should have a 1-2 page resume you can use in your job search. As you move through the program and learn more about project management, be sure to update this resume to include your new skills and experiences. 

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity. 

Step-By-Step Instructions

Step 1: Access the template

To use the template for this course item, click the link below and select “Use Template.”

Link to template: Project Management Resume

OR

If you don’t have a Google account, you can download the template directly from the attachment below.Activity Template_ Project management resumeDOCX FileDownload file

Step 2: Find a job description that interests you

For this activity, you will need to refer to the Tailoring your resume for project management reading. Keep it open as you fill out the sections of your resume.

Before creating your resume, think about the kind of position you want. Project management skills are used in nearly every industry, so spend some time thinking about where you want to apply your skills. 

Next, find a job description that interests you. Review it carefully and highlight some of the qualities the employer is searching for. For example, “detail-oriented,” “collaborative,” “strategic,” and “creative” are all qualities that could appear in job descriptions. Be sure to use some of these keywords in your resume so the company understands how you can meet their needs. 

Review the Tailor the content section of the reading for more information on how to connect your experience to the job description.

Step 3: Create your project management resume

Now that you’re familiar with the job description, it’s time to start writing your resume. Refer to the reading for detailed instructions on how to fill out the following sections of the template:

  • Contact information
  • Professional summary
  • Core competencies 
  • Professional experience
  • Education and certifications

Step 4: Proofread and format your resume

Finally, proofread your resume for spelling and grammatical errors. You can adjust the template as needed, but make sure it’s easy to read. Websites like resumeworded.com or enhancv.com can help you find a template style that works for you.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following elements in your completed resume:

  • Contact information, a professional summary, core competencies, professional experience, and education and certifications
  • Keywords from the job description
  • Bullets that link your past experience to the job description using the P.A.R.I.S. formula
  • Correct grammar and punctuation
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Quiz 5: Activity: Create or update your professional social media profile

Q1. This is an optional activity. To “pass” this practice quiz, you must receive 100%, or 1 out of 1 point, by completing the activity below.

Activity Overview

In this activity, you will create or update a professional social media profile (LinkedIn) to prepare you for your job search. Prospective employers will check out your online presence, so your professional profile is as important as your resume. This profile should highlight the same project management experience and skills as your resume, with a few key differences. As you move through the program and learn more about project management, you should update this profile to include your new skills and experience

Be sure to complete this activity before moving on. The next course item will provide you with a completed exemplar to compare to your own work. You will not be able to access the exemplar until you have completed this activity.

Step-By-Step Instructions

Part 1 – LinkedIn Essentials

Step 1: Create a LinkedIn account

If you don’t already have one, sign up for a LinkedIn account. Be sure to use an email address that’s appropriate for professional communication.

Step 2: Upload a photo

Your photo can be a company headshot or a personal snapshot. Just make sure it’s not too informal or inappropriate. This photo will be your introduction to recruiters, and you want to make a good impression. When taking or selecting a photo, aim for the following criteria:

  • Your face should fill the frame and be well-lit.
  • You should dress as you would for work.
  • Your expression should be relaxed and approachable—in other words, someone recruiters want to get to know.

Step 3: Write your headline

Your headline is the most prominent part of your profile, aside from your name. You can use your current job title here, but many people get creative with their headlines. You can use it to highlight your skills or describe your professional passions. Explore the profiles of other project management professionals to find inspiration.

Step 4: Write your “About” summary

The “About” section is similar to the professional summary of a resume, but it differs in two important ways:

  • It can be (slightly) more general. Instead of tailoring your profile to a single job, search multiple job descriptions for keywords and patterns to include. Recruiters from many companies and industries will review your profile, so you don’t want to limit yourself.
  • It can expand on your skills or tell a story. Your “About” can be a little longer than your professional summary. Use it to highlight your passions and skills—don’t be afraid to talk about yourself!

Step 5: Add your experience

Enter your work experience, including title, company, dates worked, and relevant accomplishments for each role. These should be similar to your resume bullets and use the P.A.R.I.S. framework (problems that needed to be solved, actions taken, results of those actions, the impact on the project, and any supporting evidence). As with the “About” section, you should adapt your bullets to accommodate multiple job descriptions.

Step 6: Enter your education

Include any degrees you hold, along with the institutions (your graduation date is optional). You can also add classes in relevant subjects and any capstone projects you completed. Listing activities or clubs you participated in can let recruiters know what’s important to you.

Step 7: Add your skills

Don’t forget to include any skills that highlight your strengths, talents, and proficiency in specific tools. These can be both technical and interpersonal skills.

Step 8: Add your credentials and certifications

Add any relevant credentials or certifications you may hold—including this one, which you can enter as “Google Project Management Certificate, expected [Month], [Year].” (Note: select a date format commonly used in your location.)

Part 2 – Optional Elements

Now that you’ve completed your basic profile, consider including these optional elements:

Step 1: Link to your portfolio

You may think portfolios are only for writers or designers, but project managers can also showcase their work through portfolios. A good portfolio outlines the projects you’ve managed, artifacts you’ve created (if they are not confidential), your approach to problem-solving, and the positive outcomes of your work. If you have a portfolio, consider linking to it here.

Step 2: Add your volunteer work

Don’t underestimate the value of volunteer experience! It’s often a great way to get experience and demonstrate your project management capabilities. List any relevant volunteering you may have done and explain how you used your project management skills for good.

Step 3: List your awards and honors

If you’ve received any professional awards or honors for your work, add them to your profile.

Step 4: Add your professional organization affiliations

Professional organizations can be great networking tools, so be sure to list your current affiliations.

Step 5: Add the languages you can speak and write

If you can speak or write more than one language, don’t forget to include them. Language skills can be valuable to future employers.

Step 6: Ask for recommendations and testimonials

Ask colleagues to write testimonials that promote your skills, talents, and accomplishments. A personal recommendation can go a long way!

Step 7: Upload a background photo

In addition to your headshot, you also have the option to upload a background photo. A background photo is a great way to tell recruiters a bit more about yourself.

Step 8: Upload a video

If you’re good with a camera, a short video introduction is another option to engage people who visit your profile.

What to Include in Your Response

Be sure to address the following points in your completed profile:

  • A photo, headline, summary, experience, education, skills, and certifications
  • Elements that express your skills, values, and personality
  • Bullets that link your past experience to the job description using the P.A.R.I.S. formula
  • Keywords from relevant job descriptions
  • Optional elements like a portfolio link, volunteer experience, or awards
Did you complete this activity?
  • Yes
  • No

Project Planning: Putting It All Together Coursera Weekly Challenge 5 Answers

Q1. What do project managers need to identify before creating a communication plan?

  • Recipients, communication methods, project risks, and goals of communication
  • Recipients, communication methods, goals of communication, and barriers to communication
  • Recipients, project risks, goals of communication, and barriers to communication
  • Recipients, anonymous survey  s, goals of communication, and barriers to communication

Q2. How can you foster effective communication within your team? Select all that apply.

  • Obtain feedback and incorporate it going forward
  • Allow teammates to use any communication platform they prefer
  • Recognize and understand individual differences
  • Send identical message content to both teammates and stakeholders

Q3. What is the purpose of a communication plan?

  • Centralize project documentation
  • Outline a process for knowledge management
  • Establish roles and responsibilities for team members
  • Organize and document the processes, types, and expectations of communication

Q4. As a project manager, you have a weekly video conference with stakeholders as part of your communication plan. What two additional details should the communication plan include?

  • Key dates
  • Duration
  • Location
  • Goal

Q5. What potential barriers should you consider when making a communication plan? Select all that apply.

  • Privacy or internet access issues
  • How competitors communicate
  • Time zone limitations
  • Linguistic and cultural differences

Q6. Project managers should create communication plans to ensure that projects can carry on in their absence. What is the term for this best practice?

  • continuity
  • substitution
  • follow-through
  • backup

Q7. Fill in the blank: Daily meetings and quick virtual check-ins are good ways for project managers to communicate with _____.

  • project customers
  • key stakeholders
  • senior management
  • core team members

Q8. Which of the following are best practices for concise emails? Select all that apply.

  • Lead with key points and action items
  • Write in one long paragraph to save space
  • Add a note at the top that some details may not be relevant to certain recipients
  • Include as much detail about a situation as possible

Q9. Fill in the blank: Documenting and organizing plans provides visibility for project team members and _____ for task owners.

  • accountability
  • supervision
  • authority
  • feedback

Q10. What document acts as a quick reference guide to help team members find files they frequently access in one place?

  • A project proposal
  • A risk management plan
  • A centralized planning document
  • A project charter
Project Planning: Putting It All Together Coursera Course Review:

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This Course is a part of the Google Project Management: Professional Certificate

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