Teach English Now! Second Language Reading, Writing, and Grammar Quiz Answers

Get All Weeks Teach English Now! Second Language Reading, Writing, and Grammar Quiz Answers

In this course, you will learn ideas for teaching reading and writing courses, and how to include grammar instruction within them. Learn how to help students with differing types of reading problems and how to implement both intensive and extensive reading strategies.

Learn strategies to engage students in the stages of writing–pre-writing, writing, and post-writing. Find out about different writing problems that students may encounter. Incorporate grammar through the use of noticing and input enhancement.

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Week 1: Teach English Now! Second Language Reading, Writing, and Grammar Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Welcome Guide

Q1. Who handles course content issues?

  • Coursera
  • ASU

Q2. Who handles technical issues?

  • Coursera
  • ASU

Q3. The deadlines are…

  • simply a guide.
  • simply a guide, except the last one at the end of the course.
  • to be followed exactly.

Q4. To alert your peers to review an assignment, you should…

  • post a request in Discussions.
  • post a request with a shareable link in Discussions.
  • do nothing.

Q5. In order to receive the 150 Hour TESOL certificate from ASU, you must…

  • successfully complete the course you are taking right now.
  • successfully complete Part 1.
  • successfully complete Parts 1 and 2.

Quiz 2: Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. What kind of learner does the Scarecrow represent?

  • One who thinks reading is “passive,” so he or she does not connect reading with active strategies (like asking questions, predicting, thinking about the text, and evaluating the author’s ideas) and the need to interact with a text.
  • One who thinks that reading is a waste of time and so does not enjoy it, preferring instead to watch movies or interact on social media.
  • One who does not have enough background knowledge to make good predictions while reading, and so often cannot fully comprehend a text.
  • One who is disrespectful to the teacher.

Q2. About 85% of all communication is done with as little as __ words. (Choose one correct answer.)

  • 2,000
  • 60,000
  • 22,000
  • 5,000

Q3. What does Dorothy believe is important to do while reading? (Check all that apply.)

  • Think critically while reading.
  • Predict what will happen in the text.
  • Read from left to right and up to down.
  • Read and then compare information from multiple sources.
  • Ask questions while reading.
  • Move one’s finger across a page while reading.

Q4. Which of these is NOT a danger of focusing on phonics? (Choose one correct answer.)

  • A focus on sound can often be boring for learners.
  • Learners may begin to think about language as not connected to meaning or culture.
  • Learners cannot focus on sound if they are reading silently.

Q5. Almost all reading researchers agree that good readers… (Check all that apply.)

  • enjoy reading.
  • have a greater ability to focus on meaning instead of sound.
  • read quickly.
  • move their fingers across the page as they read.
  • are good at making predictions.

Quiz 3: Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. What kind of reader is the “Tin Man”? (Choose the best answer.)

  • One who thinks reading is “passive,” so he or she does not connect reading with active strategies (like asking questions, predicting, thinking about the text, and evaluating the author’s ideas) and the need to interact with a text.
  • One who is disrespectful to the teacher.
  • One who does not have enough world knowledge to make good predictions while reading, and so often cannot fully comprehend a text.
  • One who thinks that reading is a waste of time and so does not enjoy it, preferring instead to watch movies or interact on social media.

Q2. According to Dorothy, reading is most like what sport? (Choose the best answer.)

  • Swimming, because it’s risky to do in a rainstorm.
  • Badminton, because even un-athletic people can do it.
  • Tennis, because reading is an active exchange between two players: the reader and the author.
  • Basketball, because you read in a team.

Q3. What purposes may pre-reading activities serve? (Check all that apply.)

  • Connect the reader’s prior knowledge, experiences, and opinions to the text.
  • Give the reader some practice with summarizing.
  • Build vocabulary.
  • Provide background information, thus increasing interest and motivation.

Q4. Building ____, or packets of information or knowledge, can help readers better connect their own past knowledge/experience to the text and predict while reading. (Choose the best answer.)

  • Predictions
  • Buildings
  • Schemata
  • Post-reading activities

Q5. What concepts did Dorothy employ to help motivate the social-media loving, selfie-taking Lion? (Check all that apply.)

  • Future authenticity, or assigning students reading which they may be able to use in their own lives.
  • Entropy, or the concept that all reading, if left unguided, will dissolve into chaos.
  • Immediacy, or designing a lesson that is personally meaningful and immediately useful for the reader.
  • Autonomy, or allowing students to find literature that fits their own interests and ideas.

Quiz 4: Graded Checkpoint (10 Multiple Choice Questions)

Q1. Which of these are reasons discussed in this module for why a “scarecrow” learner might struggle with reading? (Select all that apply.)

  • Learners may not know vocabulary and understanding of simple sentence structure.
  • Learners may lack strategies for reading effectively.
  • Learners may not know the “rules of the game” or conventions of different genres.
  • Learners may lack “world knowledge” or the ability to apply what they’ve learned in other contexts to aid their understanding while reading.
  • Learners may not know how to decode the letters and sounds that make up words.

Q2. What kind of learner does the Tin Man represent?

  • One who is disrespectful to the teacher.
  • One who does not have enough background knowledge to make good predictions while reading, and so often cannot fully comprehend a text.
  • One who thinks that reading is a waste of time and so does not enjoy it, preferring instead to watch movies or interact on social media.
  • One who thinks reading is “passive,” so he or she does not connect reading with active strategies (like asking questions, predicting, thinking about the text, and evaluating the author’s ideas) and the need to interact with a text.

Q3. What kind of learner does the Lion represent?

  • One who is disrespectful to the teacher.
  • One who does not have enough background knowledge to make good predictions while reading, and so often cannot fully comprehend a text.
  • One who thinks that reading is a waste of time and so does not enjoy it, preferring instead to watch movies or interact on social media.
  • One who thinks reading is “passive,” so he or she does not connect reading with active strategies (like asking questions, predicting, thinking about the text, and evaluating the author’s ideas) and the need to interact with a text.

Q4. Why is tennis a good metaphor for reading?

  • Because reading is fun.
  • Because you should wear a baseball cap to protect your face from the sun when you read.
  • Because you need the right equipment to read well.
  • Because reading is an active exchange between two players: the reader and the author.

Q5. Important skills for effective reading include… (Check all that apply.)

  • The ability to connect what one is reading to past knowledge or experience.
  • The ability to make predictions.
  • The ability to read without one’s lips moving.
  • The ability to focus on meaning instead of sound.

Q6. Active reading will generally involve…

  • Listening and speaking activities
  • Pre-reading, reading, and post-reading activities
  • Reading while running on a treadmill
  • Activities that involve social media

Q7. Post-reading activities are a chance for… (check all that apply)

  • To activate past knowledge.
  • Teachers to quickly and furtively check Facebook while their students aren’t looking.
  • Learners to apply, synthesize, and evaluate a reading.
  • Teachers to assess what students were able to comprehend and recall.

Q8. Allowing students to find reading material that is of “high interest” to them as individuals is an example of…

  • Immediacy
  • Admirability
  • Autonomy
  • Future Authenticity

Q9. Which of these activities may be used as a pre-reading activity to build interest and connection to the text? (check all that apply)

  • Reading out loud in a reading circle.
  • Having students scan the title and subheadings of the reading and make predictions about what they are about to read.
  • Having the students summarize the reading with a partner.
  • Discussing a series of pictures related to the reading to see what students already know about the topic.
  • Having students highlight the text, take notes as they read, or stop reading to share ideas with a class member.

Q10. How was Dorothy able to get the Lion to read? (Check all that apply.)

  • By finding ways to intrigue him.
  • By piquing his curiosity.
  • By making him want to read.
  • By giving him money.
  • By getting angry and threatening him.

Week 2: Teach English Now! Second Language Reading, Writing, and Grammar Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. According to video #2, what are 2 purposes for extensive reading?

  • To help the learner find interesting stories
  • To give the learners a healthy amount of exposure
  • To help learners enjoy reading
  • To expand the reader’s vocabulary
  • To improve the learner’s reading speed and comprehension

Q2. According to Video #2, some extensive reading critics argue that this reading
approach is “lazy” because

  • students read books while the teacher watches TV and eats popcorn.
  • students are allowed to read the same book over and over again.
  • students are given a lot of free time to read.
  • students are allowed to fall asleep if the story is boring.

Q3. How can a teacher assess extensive reading? Check all that apply.

  • Character Maps
  • Reading Logs
  • Debates
  • Discussions
  • Book Reports
  • Outlines

Q4. Anderson and Nagy (1992) postulate that if a student reads for 25 minutes a day, they will likely learn how many new words in 1 year?

  • 3500
  • 2000
  • 1000
  • 500

Q5. The success of extensive reading is contingent upon the student

  • finding a quiet place to read every day.
  • learning to read for pleasure.
  • learning new vocabulary words each week.
  • being able to write a book report.

Quiz 2: Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. According to Coach Tortoise, the goal of reading should be

  • to improve your reading speed.
  • to understand what you are reading.
  • to learn new vocabulary words.
  • to read for fun.

Q2. Which reading method is considered to be more
teacher-centered?

  • Both A and B
  • Coach Tortoise’s Method
  • Coach Hare’s Method
  • Neither A nor B

Q3. A “jigsaw” is an activity that

  • Divides the class into 4 groups (A,B,C, and D), where each group is dependent on the other groups to complete the exercise.
  • Gives students strategies for learning to identify and understand vocabulary words by studying prefixes, suffixes, and morphemes.
  • Helps students to identify parts of speech.

Q4. Coach tortoise believes that

  • proficiency fuels passion.
  • passion creates precision.
  • precision creates passion.
  • passion fuels proficiency.

Q5. Which of the following sequences is correct

  • Intensive Reading=Wide Angle Lens; Extensive Reading=Zoom Lens
  • Extensive Reading=Wide Angle Lens; Intensive Reading=Zoom Lens

Quiz 3: Graded Checkpoint (10 Multiple Choice Questions)

Q1. The goal of Coach Hare’s reading method can be summarized by which 2 words:

  • Comprehension and Speed
  • Exposure and Comprehension
  • Pleasure and Exposure
  • Pleasure and Speed

Q2. Areas that are specifically designed to help promote reading among students are called:

  • Reading Logs
  • Reading Zones
  • Reading Platforms
  • Reading Reports

Q3. A fill in the blank exercise can also be called a(n):

  • Information Gap
  • Jigsaw
  • Cloze Passage.
  • Outline

Q4. How can a teacher assess extensive reading (mark all that apply)?

  • Outlines
  • Reading Logs
  • Character Maps
  • Discussions
  • Debates
  • Reading Reports

Q5. Some extensive reading critics argue that this reading approach is “lazy” because

  • Students are allowed to read the same book over and over again.
  • Students are allowed to fall asleep if the story is boring.
  • Students read books while the teacher learns how to play the guitar.
  • Students are given a lot of free time to read.

Q6. Which reading method is considered to be more teacher-centered?

  • Neither Coach Hare’s NOR Coach Tortoise’s methods
  • Both Coach Hare’s AND Coach Tortoise’s methods
  • Coach Hare’s method
  • Coach Tortoise’s method

Q7. Which reading strategy can attempt to break down sentences into parts of speech, which can help learners understand the differences between verbs, nouns, adjectives, and adverbs.

  • Intensive Reading
  • Extensive Reading

Q8. Coach Tortoise believes that:

  • Proficiency fuels passion
  • Passion fuels proficiency
  • Precision creates passion
  • Passion creates precision

Q9. Newspaper corners, reading zones, jigsaws, morphology, and reading logs are all reading strategies that can be employed by an ESL teacher to improve reading fluency.

  • False
  • True

Q10. Which of the following is the best reading strategy for middle school students?

  • Intensive Reading
  • A combination of both
  • Neither of these 2 methods
  • Extensive Reading

Week 3: Teach English Now! Second Language Reading, Writing, and Grammar Quiz Answers

Quiz : Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. What does it mean when the video says, “writing
is best viewed as a process rather than a product?”

  • Writing should be done without any input from
    the teacher.
  • Writing is a complex activity that isolates
    students.
  • Writing should be done in one step.
  • Writing is a complex activity that can be aided
    by careful writing activities.

Q2. What is pre-writing?

  • Giving students a writing assignment
  • An activity that gets students talking, reading,
    and thinking about the topic after writing.
  • An activity that gets students talking, reading,
    and thinking about the topic before writing
  • Ignoring background information

Q3. How can you let students know about what you,
the teacher, expect from a writing assignment? Select the ONE best answer

  • All of the above
  • Give them specific vocabulary you are looking
    for
  • Give them specifics on the length of the paper,
    due dates, and basic writing conventions (font size, margin size, etc.)
  • Provide a model (example) for students

Q4. What is one of the most important things you can
do after students write?

  • Have students talk about their writing (peer
    review).
  • Have students talk about John Maynard Keyes and
    F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • Review important vocabulary.
  • Give them their grade immediately.

Q5. Some students feel overwhelmed at the thought of
writing because (select all that apply):

  • They think their ideas might be terrible.
  • They fear they might not have any ideas.
  • They fear they will not meet the teacher’s
    expectations.

Quiz 2: Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. What is recursive writing?

  • Reviewing your writing for coherence only
  • Using cursive script to create a written piece
    of work
  • Reviewing your writing, evaluating, and making
    changes
  • Reviewing your writing only for grammar and
    spelling

Q2. What does it mean to “go global” with writing?

  • To focus on individual words and sentences
  • To make changes in organization, order, and in
    the ideas themselves
  • To focus primarily on grammatical items
  • To write with an international audience in mind

Q3. Why should we, as teachers, avoid
“appropriation?”

  • Because we value our students’ ideas and
    language and want to see how they express themselves in writing
  • Because our ideas are the most important, and
    students should write the way we want them to
  • Because poor models and instructions will damage
    a student’s writing
  • None of the above

Q4. What should you provide to students through each
draft in the writing process?

  • Feedback
  • Nothing; the student should be able to
    self-correct without any feedback
  • Paper, pens, and pencils
  • Specifics on the length of the paper, due dates,
    and basic writing conventions (font size, margin size, etc.)

Q5. You should always fix your students’ grammar
before they have a strong sense of organization, paragraph structure, and
coherent ideas.

  • True
  • False

Quiz 3: Graded Checkpoint (10 Multiple Choice Questions)

Q1.Why might some students be overwhelmed by a writing assignment? (Check all that apply.)

  • Difficulty in coming up with ideas to write about.
  • A lack of confidence about one’s ideas.
  • Fear of not meeting the teacher’s expectations.
  • Unwillingness to seek help or feedback in the writing process.
  • Fear of being eaten by a witch.

Q2. The concept that writing is a process, not a product, means that:

  • Teachers should not give clear instructions about what and how they want students to write – students should just use their imaginations.
  • Writing should be done as quickly as possible, preferably in one step so that students don’t stunt their creativity.
  • Writing is a complex activity that should be broken up into different steps so that students don’t become confused and overwhelmed.
  • The teacher should do most of the writing and students should just “fill in the blanks.”

Q3. In regards to writing activities, what does it mean to “prime the pump”?

  • Helping learners connect concepts and information they already know to new information and skills they will need in their writing.
  • Giving students a writing assignment without first piquing their interest.
  • Giving students food so that they are not hungry while writing.
  • Teaching students exactly what the teacher expects before they start writing.

Q4. It is okay to grade students on things you did not write down in your instructions. All teachers have the same expectations, and students should already know those expectations before they get to your class!

  • True.
  • False.

Q5. You should never ask students to share their writing with their classmates because they will feel stupid or ridiculous.

  • True.
  • False.

Q6. Writing is like composing music in that…

  • Both writing and composing are very glamorous processes.
  • Writing and composing music are both very difficult for English language students.
  • It is important for both writers and composers (and painters and other artists!) to review their work, evaluate it, and make changes as needed.
  • It is important for both writers and composers to use high-quality instruments.

Q7. To “go global” while teaching writing means to focus on helping students develop organization, order, and ideas, as opposed to just grammar.

  • False.
  • True.

Q8. Students should never challenge the teacher because the teacher is always right.

  • False.
  • True.

Q9. “Appropriation” in writing is when students don’t like their teacher’s ideas and so write about a topic that is not appropriate to the assignment.

  • True.
  • False.

Q10. A writing teacher should act mostly as a ____.

  • Witch.
  • Consultant.
  • Director.
  • Manager.

Week 4: Teach English Now! Second Language Reading, Writing, and Grammar Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. In this lesson, Dr. Dixon discussed the 6 Traits of Writing
and how they can assist our students in the writing process. The 6 Traits of
Writing are Ideas, Organization, Voice, and…..

  • Sentence Fluency
  • Mechanics
  • Formatting
  • Convention
  • Grammar
  • Word Choice

Q2. Correct punctuation, formatting, and spelling would all fall under which Trait?

  • Voice
  • Sentence Fluency
  • Conventions
  • Organization

Q3. Regardless of which strategy you employ in your writing
class, it is important that you use modeling, ______, and
independent practice in your lesson.

  • Brainstorming
  • Guided Practice
  • Reflection
  • Outlining

Q4. Dr. Dixon covered 3 best strategies for that can help your students in the pre-writing stage. Which one was not mentioned?

  • Good writing is good reading.
  • Good writing is good thinking.
  • Good writing is good listening.
  • Good writing is good speaking.

Q5. Brainstorming should not be a group activity because students need to learn to develop their own ideas to write effectively.

  • False
  • True

Quiz 2: Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. Which one of the 6 Traits of Writing considers
the author-audience connection?

  • Voice
  • Conventions
  • Organization
  • Word Choice

Q2. If the author neglects the audience-author connection, the reader may find that the story may be:

  • Exciting
  • Boring
  • Informative
  • Interesting

Q3. Using an outline is a good way to ________ your writing.

  • Give more description in
  • Check for sentence fluency in
  • Build organization in
  • Fix the Grammar in

Q4. Outlines, mind-webs, and __ are three activities that our students can use to help them organize their ideas.

  • Paragraph Charts
  • Parapgraph Organizers
  • Paragraph Blocks
  • Paragraph Squares

Q5. When we have our students create outlines, we should check them over to make sure that there is correct grammar and voice; otherwise, they may have trouble in the “writing” stage of the process.

  • False
  • True

Quiz 3: Graded Checkpoint (10 Q’s)

Q1. Dr. Dixon covered 3 best strategies that can help your students in the pre-writing stage. Which one is not mentioned?

  • Good writing is good thinking.
  • Good writing is good speaking.
  • Good writing is good listening.
  • Good writing is good reading.

Q2. Brainstorming should not be a group activity because students need to learn to develop their own ideas to write effectively.

  • False
  • True

Q3. In this module, Dr. Dixon taught us about the 6 Traits of Writing and how they can assist our students in the writing process. The 6 Traits of Writing are Ideas, Organization, Voice, Conventions, Word Choice, and:

  • Grammar
  • Formatting
  • Sentence Fluency
  • Mechanics

Q4. Regardless of which strategy you employ in your writing class, it is important that you use modeling, guided practice, and ___ in your lesson.

  • Outlining
  • Reflection
  • Independent Practice
  • Brainstorming

Q5. Correct punctuation, spelling, and formatting would all fall under which trait?

  • Organization
  • Voice
  • Conventions
  • Sentence Fluency

Q6. If the author neglects the audience-author connection, the reader may find that the story may be:

  • Interesting
  • Boring
  • Informative
  • Exciting

Q7. Which of the 6 Traits of Writing considers the audience-author connection?

  • Voice
  • Conventions
  • Word Choice
  • Organization

Q8. Using an outline is a good way to _ your writing.

  • give more description in
  • Fix the grammar in
  • Check for sentence fluency
  • build organization in

Q9. Outlines, mind-webs, and __ are three activites that our students can use to help them organize their ideas.

  • Paragraph Squares
  • Paragraph Organizers
  • Paragraph Charts
  • Paragraph Blocks

Q10. When we have our students create outlines, we should check
them over to make sure that there is correct grammar and voice;
otherwise, they may have trouble in the “writing” stage of the process.

  • False
  • True

Week 5: Teach English Now! Second Language Reading, Writing, and Grammar Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. In the 1980s, grammar teaching was largely ignored in which of these popular approaches to language learning?

  • Communicative Approach
  • Grammar Translation Approach
  • Audiolingual Approach
  • Affective-Humanistic Approach

Q2. Whose research showed that language learners who were immersed in communicative language classes at school still continued to make grammar errors?

  • Merrill Swain
  • Mike Sharwood Smith
  • Richard Schmidt
  • Shane Dixon

Q3. Module 5 will be about which of the following?

  • How to teach grammar on its own.
  • How to incorporate grammar into a reading/writing class.

Q4. What are the prince, princess, and the queen all having difficulty with?

  • Noticing certain things that would help them be successful.
  • Learning the passive voice.
  • Reading and writing.
  • Feeling a pea under a stack of mattress.

Q5. In the third video, we gave two tips for getting your learners to pay attention to grammar. The first tip was to recognize that each learner has different problems. What was the second tip?

  • Each learner has different problems.
  • To recognize that learners often have similar problems.
  • Your job is to help students recognize their errors.
  • Trick question; there was no second tip!

Quiz 2: Checkpoint Quiz (5Q’s)

Q1. What theorist came up with the noticing hypothesis?

  • Shane Dixon
  • Merrill Swain
  • Richard Schmidt
  • Mike Sharwood Smith

Q2. Which example is a metaphor for the theory of input enhancement?

  • Turning the gate red so the princess can notice it more easily.
  • Putting the princess on top of a stack of mattresses.
  • The prince not being able to hear the princess knocking.
  • The prince continuing to draw pictures.

Q3. Which of these is NOT a way to help students notice grammar in a reading/writing class?

  • Giving feedback on student assignments.
  • Creating lesson plans to encourage the use of specific grammatical items.
  • Using bolded phrases, italics, and/or underlining.
  • Ignoring a student’s grammar error.

Q4. The queen didn’t notice her son’s drawings even after input enhancement. What does this signify?

  • She is not smart.
  • Jessica did a terrible job enhancing the input.
  • Enhanced input won’t automatically cause noticing, because sometimes the person is focused on something else.
  • The drawings are not worth noticing.

Q5. According to the fifth video, what is a common trap that teachers can fall into when teaching grammar?

  • Being too focused on rules and ignoring context.
  • Throwing students’ drawings on the floor of the castle.
  • Praising students for their effort and progress.
  • Creating multiple opportunities for students to see grammatical forms that might be tricky for them.

Quiz 3: Graded Checkpoint (10 Q’s)

Q1. The theory of input enhancement was proposed by…

  • Shane Dixon
  • Richard Schmidt
  • Mike Sharwood Smith
  • Merrill Swain

Q2. Which of these is NOT a big question that was mentioned about teaching grammar?

  • Won’t learners just pick up grammar by using the language?
  • How should grammar be incorporated into lesson plans?
  • Why won’t students use the grammar forms they have been taught?
  • Why is grammar so easy to teach?

Q3. Which of these is NOT an example of enhancing input?

  • Turning the gate red.
  • Making the prince’s drawings glow.
  • Changing the knock to a gong.
  • Putting the princess on a bunch of mattresses.

Q4. What is the noticing hypothesis?

  • That learners will notice whatever you put in front of them as long as you enhance the input.
  • That learners cannot learn the grammatical features of a language unless they FIRST notice them.
  • That learners will immediately acquire whatever they notice.
  • That the teacher has to notice what learners don’t know.

Q5. Which of the following are important to remember when teaching grammar? Choose 2.

  • That learners are on their own subconscious schedule — not your curriculum calendar.
  • That we should teach elements of grammar that are not truly useful or attainable by students.
  • That teachers need to create multiple opportunities for learners to see forms that might be tricky for them.
  • That you can force your students to notice what you want them to notice.

Q6. Some reading and writing assignments may create demand for certain kinds of grammatical forms. This can present an opportunity for you, as the teacher, to briefly stop and have a grammar noticing activity.

  • True
  • False

Q7. Research by Merrill Swain suggested which of the following?

  • Grammar forms are all just “picked up” through language use.
  • Teaching grammar is ineffective.
  • Even when students are immersed in language, they don’t just “pick up” all of the grammar forms.
  • We should enhance input in order for students to notice grammar forms.

Q8. We suggest that one of the teacher’s jobs when teaching grammar is to…

  • Ignore students’ grammar errors.
  • Help students pay attention to things they are not noticing, such as grammar forms or grammar errors.
  • Focus on the very specific rules of grammar that would make students perfect language users.
  • Get students to notice grammar forms so that they can immediately begin using them.

Q9. Which of the following are ways to help students notice grammar in your reading/writing lessons? Choose all that are correct.

  • Creating lessons that encourage learners to use specific grammatical items.
  • Repeating something in class.
  • Using bolded phrases, italics, or underlining.
  • Assuming that learners will just learn language forms.

Q10. When incorporating grammar into a reading/writing class, teachers should remember that the ultimate goal is…

  • To help learners communicate their message and achieve their goals.
  • To make sure that learners can repeat all the rules about a grammar form.
  • To make sure that learners will be able to pass grammar tests.
  • To make learners notice what you want them to notice.

Week 6: Teach English Now! Second Language Reading, Writing, and Grammar Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Final Checkpoint (25 questions)

Q1. What are three kinds of non-readers discussed in Module 1? (Check all that apply.)

  • The “Lion Reader,” one who thinks that reading is a waste of time and so does not enjoy it, preferring instead to watch movies or interact on social media.
  • The “Scarecrow Reader,” who does not have enough background knowledge to make good predictions while reading, and so often cannot fully comprehend a text.
  • The “Tortoise Reader,” one who reads so slowly that he never begins to enjoy the story.
  • The “Hare Reader,” one who reads as quickly as possible, not paying attention to details.
  • The “Tin Man Reader,” one who thinks reading is “passive,” so he or she does not connect reading with active strategies (like asking questions, predicting, thinking about the text, and evaluating the author’s ideas) and the need to interact with a text.

Q2. In Module 1, what is Dorothy’s advice to non-readers?

  • Think critically while reading.
  • Before and as you read, predict what will happen in the text.
  • Read and then compare information from multiple sources.
  • Read from top to bottom and left to right.
  • Move your finger across a page while reading.
  • Ask questions while reading.

Q3. What does the expression “writing is best viewed as a process rather than a product?” mean in the context of this course?

  • Writing should be done in one step.
  • Writing should be done without any input from the teacher.
  • Writing is a complex activity that isolates students.
  • Writing is a complex activity that can be aided by careful writing activities.

Q4. What are some ways a teacher might let students know what she or he expects from a writing assignment? (Check all that apply.)

  • Give them websites from which they can copy.
  • Provide a model (example) for students.
  • Give them specifics on the length of the paper, due dates, and basic writing conventions (font size, margin size, etc.)
  • Write the essay for them and encourage them to put their names on the top of the first page.
  • Give them specific vocabulary you are looking for.

Q5. What is one of the most important things you can do after students write?

  • Have students discuss their writing with each other (peer review).
  • Review important vocabulary.
  • Have students talk about John Maynard Keyes and F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • Give them their grade immediately.

Q6. Some students feel overwhelmed at the thought of writing because

  • they fear they will not meet the teacher’s expectations.
  • All of the above.
  • they fear they might not have any ideas.
  • they think their ideas might be terrible.

Q7. What is recursive writing?

  • Reviewing your writing, evaluating, and making changes.
  • Reviewing your writing only for grammar and spelling.
  • Using cursive script to create a written piece of work.
  • Reviewing your writing for coherence only.

Q8. What does it mean to “go global” with writing?

  • To write with an international audience in mind.
  • To focus primarily on grammatical items.
  • To make changes in organization, order, and in the ideas themselves.
  • To focus on individual words and sentences.

Q9. Why should we, as teachers, avoid “appropriation?”

  • Because the teacher’s ideas are the most important, and students should write the way we want them to.
  • Because we value our students’ ideas and language, and want to see how they express themselves in writing.
  • Because poor models and instructions will damage a student’s writing.
  • None of the above.

Q10. Grammar is the most important part of a writing class. Students should have perfect grammar before they begin to develop text organization, paragraph structure, and coherent ideas.

  • True.
  • False.

Q11. In regards to writing activities, what does it mean to “prime the pump”?

  • Giving students a writing assignment without first piquing their interest.
  • Helping learners connect concepts and information they already know to new information and skills they will need in their writing.
  • Giving students food so that they are not hungry while writing.
  • Teaching students exactly what the teacher expects before they start writing.

Q12. You should never ask students to share their writing with their classmates because they will feel stupid or ridiculous.

  • True.
  • False.

Q13. A writing teacher should act mostly as a ____.

  • Consultant.
  • Director.
  • Doctor.
  • Manager.

Q14. How can a teacher assess extensive reading (mark all that apply)?

  • Debates
  • Reading Logs
  • Outlines
  • Discussions
  • Character Maps
  • Book Reports

Q15. Reading activities should be very teacher-centered.

  • True.
  • False.

Q16. Which reading strategy can attempt to break down sentences into parts of speech, which can help learners understand the differences between verbs, nouns, adjectives, and adverbs?

  • Extensive Reading
  • Both extensive and extensive reading
  • Neither extensive nor extensive reading
  • Intensive Reading

Q17. The 6 Traits of Writing are Ideas, Organization, _, Sentence Fluency, _____________, and Word Choice.

  • Appropriation.
  • Voice.
  • Grammar.
  • Conventions.

Q18. Why might a writer wish to use an outline in his writing process?

  • To check for sentence fluency.
  • To build organization.
  • To fix his grammar.
  • None of the above.

Q19. Every step of the writing process should be individual so that each writer can produce a unique assignment.

  • False.
  • True.

Q20. Dr. Dixon covered 3 best strategies for that can help your students in the pre-writing stage. Which one was not mentioned?

  • Good writing is good speaking.
  • Good writing is good thinking.
  • Good writing is good listening.
  • Good writing is good reading.

Q21. “Noticing” is important when it comes to teaching and learning grammatical writing.

  • True.
  • False.

Q22. Reading and writing teachers should only pay attention to individual learner problems when it comes to grammar.

  • True.
  • False.

Q23. Why is some grammar instruction important?

  • Because students will notice if you don’t teach them grammar.
  • Language learners are not likely to use grammar accurately unless we give grammar some special attention.
  • Because reading and writing is boring and needs to be broken up sometimes.
  • Because grammar takes a long time to teach, so it is a nice “filler” when you don’t feel like planning a communicative lesson.

Q24. Grammar points can be introduced at random. It doesn’t really matter what grammar a teacher is teaching, as long as she/he is remembering to teach grammar.

  • False.
  • True.

Q25. In the review video, Dr. Dixon mentioned that he hopes that the lessons discussed in this course are “sticky.” What does it mean for a lesson to be “sticky”?

  • Easy to remember and bring to mind in related situations.
  • It is easy to forget.
Conclusion:

I hope this Teach English Now! Second Language Reading, Writing, and Grammar Quiz Answers would be useful for you to learn something new from the Course. If it helped you, don’t forget to bookmark our site for more Quiz Answers.

This course is intended for audiences of all experiences who are interested in learning about new skills in a business context; there are no prerequisite courses.

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