Teach English Now! Foundational Principles Coursera Quiz Answers

Get All Weeks Teach English Now! Foundational Principles Coursera Quiz Answers

Through a series of engaging metaphors and stories, prospective and current EFL/ESL teachers will identify, summarize, and evaluate 7 basic language learning paradigms. Learners will be presented with information on such foundational principles as motivation, risk-taking, two different modes of learning, and balancing the teacher profession.

Learners are also given an understanding of basic techniques founded on those principles, such as teacher talk, looking “ridiculous” in order to lower the affective filter and networking. With these foundational principles in mind, ESL/EFL teachers will scrutinize common assumptions about language learning by comparing how they stack up to research-based core principles.

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Week 1: Teach English Now! Foundational Principles Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Welcome Guide

Q1. Who handles course content issues?

  • ASU
  • Coursera

Q2. Who handles technical issues?

  • ASU
  • Coursera

Q3. The deadlines are…

  • to be followed exactly.
  • simply a guide, except the last one at the end of the course.
  • simply a guide.

Q4. To alert your peers to review an assignment, you should…

  • do nothing.
  • post a request with a shareable link in Discussions.
  • post a request in Discussions.

Q5. In order to receive the 150 Hour TESOL certificate from ASU, you must…

  • successfully finish the course you are taking right now.
  • successfully complete Part 1.
  • successfully complete Parts 1 and 2.

Quiz 2: Checkpoint 1

Q1. Students are constantly judging teacher performance and classroom
content. Which of the following statements explains how students can so
quickly judge a teacher’s performance?

  • Students care about how exciting information is, and don’t care about how important that information might be.
  • Students can quickly see teacher technique and ability, which speaks to the need for a teacher to help make meaning clear.
  • Students need to be given motivation by being given cake.
  • Students only pay attention to how a teacher dresses and speaks.

Q2. Motivation matters in the classroom. Identify the four major factors students need to be intrinsically motivated:

  • Value, knowledge, support, and encouragement
  • Enthusiasm, curiosity, passion, and energy
  • Belonging, power, freedom and fun
  • Autonomy, enthusiasm, mastery, and cheerfulness

Q3. A teacher who has taken courses on how to teach, but has no control over what they teach would fall into which of these four quadrants?

  • Low technique, low content
  • Low technique, high content
  • High technique, low content
  • High technique, high content

Quiz 3: Checkpoint 2

Q1. Part of motivation is a feeling of competence. Both Stephen Krashen and Lev Vygotsky believe students work best just a little above their performance level. Stephen Krashen calls it i + 1 . Leo Vygotsky calls it…

  • zone + 1
  • the zone of proximal development
  • the language development zone
  • the approximate learning zone

Q2. Vygotsky’s theory of the Zone of Proximal Development has students
working slightly above their level so they feel comfortable yet
challenged. To assist students in this
zone, teachers offer support – scaffolding – as they master a skill. Which of the following scenarios is an
example of scaffolding?

  • Write an essay based on the science article discussed in class today. Use the model shown at the beginning of class to guide your writing. Also use the essay we created together for further support. Turn it in on Wednesday.
  • Write an essay based on this science article. Look for relationships between it and the
    video we watched in class. Turn it in on
    Wednesday.
  • Write an essay after reading this article. Remember to use the form discussed in class. Turn it in on Wednesday.
  • Write an essay using this science article. Use your notes from class to support your
    opinion. Turn it in on Wednesday.

Q3. Dr. Dixon demonstrated the word “p’alante” in order to share how teachers can support language through the use of

  • scaffolding
  • body language
  • teacher talk
  • cake

Q4. Drs. Ambady and Rosenthal performed a study that demonstrated how quickly and proficiently students can determine the effectiveness of their teachers. One of the reasons that the study is so controversial is that

  • students identified the “good” and “bad” teachers so quickly
  • students weren’t paying attention to all the hard work the teachers put into the syllabus
  • students demonstrated a lack of empathy for the difficulty teachers have in preparing lessons, and their judgment showed how callous learners have become.
  • students weren’t really judging anything except superficial features, so the study’s validity is questionable.

Q5. Check all the characteristics of teacher talk:

  • repetition
  • elaboration
  • clarification questions
  • common cultural references
  • confusing phrases
  • reduced grammatical forms
  • simplified vocabulary
  • signpost expressions
  • motivational words

Quiz 4: Module 1 Review Quiz

Q1. Part of motivation is a feeling of
competence. Both Stephen Krashen and Leo
Vygotsky believe students work best just a little above their performance
level. Stephen Krashen calls this…

  • i + 1
  • approximate learning zone
  • zone of proximal development
  • zone + 10

Q2. Vygotsky’s theory of the Zone of Proximal
Development has students working slightly above their level so they feel
comfortable yet challenged. To assist
students in this zone, teachers offer support – scaffolding – as they master a
skill. Which of the following
scenarios is an example of scaffolding?

  • Write a paragraph about your favorite hero, using the writing frame we practiced together in class.
  • Write a paragraph using six of the vocabulary words from the chapter.
  • Read the excerpt on pg. 19 and answer the multiple choice questions at the end.
  • Write a paragraph summarizing this reading excerpt. Remember to use the paragraph structure we discussed in class.

Q3. In order to scaffold correctly, a teacher needs to break down difficult concepts by…

  • controlling: giving students information that is modified and simplified for their level
  • adjusting: changing the input to match the students’ current understanding
  • timed repetition: having students learn and process information bit by bit, not all at once
  • guiding: showing students how to create a structure
  • revising: giving students feedback based on their efforts
  • practicing: allowing students to work on what they have done again so that they can get it right
  • supporting: giving students time to process new information
  • diverting: giving students information that is different from the original text
  • converging: taking both the new information and the different information and placing them together to create something interesting
  • modeling: showing both real examples and steps of a process
  • guided practice: working through a process with students so that it is “controlled”
  • independent practice: giving students a chance to do the process on their own

Q4. Three techniques to help make meaning clear are…

  • elaboration, body language, and repetition
  • the zone of proximal development, i + 1, and high technique/high content
  • body language, teacher talk, and scaffolding
  • high technique/low content, scaffolding, and teacher talk

Q5. Here is an example of effective teacher talk:

Before: “Construction on the Panama Canal was halted for a period of time due to engineering problems and high mortality rates from disease.”

  • After: “Engineers stopped construction of the Panama Canal for a period of time because of engineering problems and a high number of worker deaths from disease.”
  • This is an example of which teacher talk strategy?
  • use of cultural references
  • elaboration
  • reduced grammatical forms
  • repetition

Q6. According to Glasser, the four basic psychological needs of belonging, competence, freedom and fun are the foundation for…

  • scaffolding
  • extrinsic motivation
  • language acquisition
  • intrinsic motivation

Q7. A Harvard research study showed that students often judge a teacher in the first 6 seconds of class, based on…

  • their content
  • their use of technology
  • their age
  • their teaching technique

Q8. This illustration shows the importance of finding a balance between technique and content. Your goal should be to fit into which quadrant?

  • High content, high technique
  • Low content, high technique
  • High content, low technique
  • Low content, low technique

Q9. Which of the following sentences includes a cultural reference that English language learners might not understand?

  • The young couple wanted to make sure they had their family’s approval before walking down the aisle.
  • Language learning is fun!
  • The President’s first priority will be fixing the economy.
  • Mexican culture is known to be very family-oriented.

Q10. Showing students how to write a sentence in the passive voice is an example of…

  • guided practice
  • i + 1
  • independent practice
  • modeling

Week 2: Teach English Now! Foundational Principles Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Checkpoint 1

Q1. Which are examples of
learning? (Check all that apply.)

  • Using your new language in a
    country that speaks it.
  • Filling in the blanks with the
    proper form of a verb.
  • Studying vocabulary.
  • Practicing a dialogue with a
    partner.

Q2. When it comes to
studying a language, which is the BEST measure of your success at using the
language?

  • Acquisition
  • Learning

Q3. Which is an example of acquisition?

  • Andrea is in a Japanese grocery store, shopping for supplies. She wants to buy salt, but she doesn’t know the Japanese word for it. She thinks she’s found a bag of salt, but it could be sugar too! She is not able to read the Japanese character for “salt”. She looks up the word for “salt” in her English-Japanese dictionary and asks a store clerk if what she has is indeed salt. It is!
  • Ali studied English for four
    years in high school and got good grades. One day, an English-speaking
    tourist stops him on the street to ask for directions. He struggles to
    find the words to explain.

Q4. How is language learning like a camera?

  • Like a camera, language learning is about zooming in to focus on the details of a language’s structure as well as zooming out to learn to use language in a wider context.
  • Like a camera, language
    learning is delicate and easily broken.
  • Like a camera, language
    learning is about a single moment in time.

Like a camera, language learning is complex and difficult to become an expert at.

Q5. Compare Brown’s and
Oakley’s metaphors. Choose the correct analogy.

  • Brown’s zoom lens = Oakley’s focused mode
    Brown’s wide-angle lens = Oakley’s diffuse mode
  • Brown’s zoom lens = Oakley’s diffuse mode
    Brown’s wide-angle lens = Oakley’s focused mode

Q6. Which answer BEST defines your role as a language teacher?

  • You are a photographer, sometimes helping students to focus on a specific language structure, other times providing opportunities for students to use the language and practice the new grammatical or sentence structures in a wider context.
  • You are a telescope, able to bring distant concepts into view.
  • You are a magnifying glass,
    explaining small details about the language.

Quiz 2: Checkpoint 2

Q1. TRUE or FALSE: Michael Jordan can teach you to play basketball just like him by teaching you all the rules.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

Q2. How is a language teacher like a coach? (Select the BEST answer.)

  • A language teacher is like a coach because he or
    she teaches the rules of the game, makes everyone practice a lot of drills, and
    does a lot of yelling from the sidelines.
  • A language teacher is like a coach because he or she teaches the rules of the game, makes sure everyone gets plenty of opportunity to practice the game in many different ways, and encourages players to take risks and keep trying.

Q3. What is the 80/20 principle?

  • A language teacher should spend 80 minutes lecturing about the language rules, and then students should spend 20 minutes practicing those rules.
  • A language teacher should plan a lesson so that 20% of the time is used for focusing on the details of the language, and 80% of the time is used for students to practice the language.
  • A language teacher should plan a lesson so that students will learn 80 new vocabulary words and 20 new grammatical structures a week.

Quiz 3: Module 2 Review Quiz

Q1. Learning is…

  • the ability to apply concepts in real-world situations.
  • the ability to pass a test.
  • the ability to memorize concepts.
  • the ability to comprehend and recall information.

Q2. Acquisition refers to…

  • the ability to learn and apply principles in the real world.
  • the ability to remember information for long periods of time
  • the ability to speak another language perfectly
  • the ability to understand another language

Q3. Which activity represents language learning in the wide-angle or diffuse mode?

  • Practicing scripted telephone dialogues with a partner
  • Role playing a doctor’s appointment
  • Writing paragraphs using a new grammatical structure
  • Using computer software to study vocabulary words

Q4. According to the 80/20 principle, 80% of class time should be spent on…

  • instruction in the focused mode
  • instruction in the diffuse mode
  • instruction using spaced repetition
  • vocabulary instruction

Q5. Using a website to study vocabulary and mark words that you still haven’t learned yet is an example of…

  • synthesizing information.
  • focused mode of instruction.
  • the diffuse mode of instruction.
  • a camera.

Q6. Brown’s zoom lens metaphor is similar to…

  • spaced repetition.
  • the Leitner System.
  • Oakley’s diffuse mode.
  • Oakley’s focused mode.

Q7. Spaced repetition refers to…

  • studying the same information over and over again
  • putting two unrelated ideas together to synthesize information
  • spending a limited time studying material, then coming back to it later, increasing amounts of time between study sessions
  • practicing items that you haven’t learned yet more frequently than those you have already memorized

Q8. Which is an example of an activity that helps advanced learners think critically and use language to express ideas.

  • Compare and contrast wedding traditions from two different cultures.
  • Identify key vocabulary words associated with wedding traditions.
  • Use the future tense to write about a popular wedding tradition.
  • Explain a wedding tradition in your culture.

Q9. Identify the learner that values accuracy over fluency.

  • Gabriel is very open and gregarious and rather indifferent to language structures and cultural conventions. He will not hesitate to speak to people in his new language.
  • Beatriz is very particular about speaking correctly. Before speaking, she spends several minutes quietly thinking to herself, checking her dictionary, and planning how she should best phrase her sentences.
  • Andrea quickly considers what she is going to say, and then asks the nearest person for directions. She is only able to retain small chunks of information, so she must ask several people for help along the way.

Q10. Considering the descriptions above, which language learner do you think you would be the most like if you were learning a new language?

  • Beatriz
  • Gabriel
  • Andrea

Week 3: Teach English Now! Foundational Principles Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Checkpoint 1

Q1. How can self-awareness be a positive thing? Check all that apply.

  • It helps you understand why you feel the way you do.
  • It makes you nervous.
  • You know how you look or feel.
  • You have confidence because you know you look or feel good.

Q2. How can self-awareness be a negative thing? Check all that apply.

  • You have confidence because you know you look or feel good.
  • It can paralyze you because it makes you feel like everyone is judging what you are doing.
  • In new situations, it causes you to over-think what you are doing and saying.
  • You lose confidence because it feels like everything you do or say is wrong.

Q3. Which answer BEST describes how language learning is like being on stage?

  • Like being on stage, learning a new language creates a heightened sense of self-awareness, where the learner is afraid to make mistakes and is almost paralyzed with tension.
  • Like being on stage, language learning requires years of practice and effort to be good enough to use it.
  • Like being on stage, language learning requires costumes, scripts, and a huge audience.

Q4. TRUE or FALSE: The affective filter is the complex set of emotions language learners experience as they try to process new information and produce language.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

Q5. Which of these is NOT a good way to lower the affective filter in your students?

  • Relate to your learners in ways that show you understand the challenges of learning a language.
  • Be willing to look silly.
  • Correct errors frequently and as soon as they happen.
  • Use formative evaluation, by giving students practice opportunities where you can guide them with constructive feedback.
  • Describe mistakes as normal part of the process.

Quiz 2: Checkpoint 2

Q1. After spending many days in his room studying vocabulary and grammar, why couldn’t Francois Gouin speak German? Check all that apply.

  • He did not practice the language in real-world contexts.
  • He couldn’t see the language with a “wide-angle lens”.
  • He wasn’t using the best dictionaries and grammar books.
  • He did not engage in activities in the diffuse mode.

Q2. What main point about language learning did the Francois Gouin story illustrate?

  • Even smart men can make mistakes.
  • Learning a language requires many hours of studying.
  • Language learning requires practice and taking risks.
  • Practice makes perfect.

Q3. Which strategy is NOT associated with successful language learning?

  • Using imagery to remember new information
  • Monitoring language output for accuracy in both form and meaning
  • Predicting meaning from social and contextual clues.
  • Memorizing thousands of words

Quiz 3: Module 3 Review Quiz

Q1. Which answer BEST describes how language learning is like being on stage?

  • Like being on stage, language learning requires costumes, scripts, and a huge audience.
  • Like being on stage, learning a new language creates a heightened sense of self-awareness, where the learner is afraid to make mistakes and is almost paralyzed with tension.
  • Like being on stage, language learning requires years of practice and effort to be good enough to use it.

Q2. Which statement is NOT true about the concept of self-awareness.

  • Self-awareness evolves over time.
  • Self-awareness has nothing to do with language acquisition.
  • Self-awareness has both positive and negative consequences.
  • Self-awareness refers to one’s ability to see themselves as other people do.

Q3. TRUE or FALSE: A high affective filter leads to successful language acquisition.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

Q4. TRUE or FALSE: An instructor describing mistakes as normal helps to lower the affective filter.

  • True
  • False

Q5. Which classroom environment would most likely lower the affective filter of language learners.

  • The teacher shares stories about making mistakes when communicating in another language.
  • The teacher is quick to correct learner mistakes and has them repeat the correct form.

Q6. Which of the following statements are true about formative assessments? Check all that apply.

  • Formative assessments measure everything the student has learned during a unit of study.
  • Formative assessments do not lower affective filters.
  • Formative assessments give learners the opportunity to practice and prepare for future testing.
  • Formative assessments are used to provide feedback to the learner.

Q7. Identify which activities would serve as a formative assessment. (Check all that apply.)

  • The students take a final exam.
  • The students present a final project.
  • The students write about themselves, then conference with the teacher about how to improve their writing.
  • The students study 10 vocabulary words and then play a game with those words.

Q8. After spending a year in Germany, why wasn’t Francois Gouin able to learn German? Check all that apply.

  • He didn’t engage in meaningful practice.
  • He didn’t spend enough time in the diffuse mode of language learning.
  • He didn’t spend enough time in the focused mode of language learning.
  • He didn’t study hard enough.

Q9. Identify the strategies used by good language learners. Check all that apply.

  • They prepare in advance and take notes.
  • They pay attention selectively to the most important information.
  • They look everything up in a dictionary.
  • They are not afraid to look ridiculous.

Q10. TRUE or FALSE: Students who play and experiment with language are typically good language learners.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

Week 4: Teach English Now! Foundational Principles Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Checkpoint 1

Q1. One of the major difficulties in teaching language is the problem of time. As explained in the videos, the problem of time means that…

  • Students have to do extracurricular sports, student council, and many other tasks that get in the way of their language learning.
  • Teachers struggle with time because they are given so many tasks to do, such as lesson planning and assessment.
  • Most schools offer language instruction for one hour a day, meaning that students don’t have enough time to practice language.
  • Parents do not give their children language support by spending time with them on their homework assignments.

Q2.What are some ways, explained in the video, to help support the learning of English OUTSIDE the classroom? Check all that apply.

  • offer student exchanges
  • select fun readings from a textbook
  • invite students to write down a list of their language resources
  • create English clubs
  • make food from an English-speaking country and bring it to clas

Q3. As the story of Shane’s 5 years of Spanish suggested, some learners fail to learn language outside of the classroom, even when they have the resources to do it. What did the story suggest about why learners fail?

  • Learners are too busy to learn a language. They are involved in the digital age, so they simply don’t see English as an important goal.
  • Learners fail to see their resources as opportunities. They don’t connect their academic life to the world outside.
  • Learners care about testing and getting grades, so they focus only on textbooks and fail to consider actually acquiring language.
  • Most learners don’t care about learning a language. Learners these days are lazy and don’t think globally.

Quiz 2: Checkpoint 2

Q1. Identify the most common ways that students can learn language through the internet. Check all that apply.

  • movies
  • textbooks
  • games
  • music

Q2. The difference between language learning websites and websites that “happen to be in English” is that…

  • language learning websites are designed for specific levels and needs of students, and websites that “happen to be in English” present real contexts and real information.
  • Language learning websites are more appropriate because they contain modified input
  • language learning websites are boring and unrealistic, and websites that are in real English help students to feel like they are really involved in language learning.
  • websites that happen to be in English are more appropriate because they contain real English in real context.

Q3. Which of the following strategies might best encourage student autonomy? Check all that apply.

  • empowering students to recognize language learning on the internet
  • emphasizing test scores as the goal of language learning
  • helping students understand the importance of the classroom
  • helping students recognize their language resources
  • inviting students to see themselves as part of a global community

Quiz 3: Module 4 Review Quiz

Q1. One of the major difficulties in teaching language is the problem of time. As explained in the videos, the problem of time means that…

  • Teachers struggle with time because they are given so many tasks to do, such as lesson planning and assessment.
  • Parents do not give their children language support by spending time with them on their homework assignments.
  • Students have to do extracurricular sports, student council, and many other tasks that get in the way of their language learning.
  • Most schools offer language instruction for one hour a day, meaning that students don’t have enough time to practice language.

Q2. Which is NOT a way to support language learners outside the classroom?

  • invite students to write down a list of their language resources
  • create English clubs
  • make food from an English-speaking country and bring it to class

Q3. As the story of Shane’s 5 years of Spanish suggested, some learners fail to learn language outside of the classroom, even when they have the resources to do it. What did the story suggest about why learners fail?

  • Learners are too busy to learn a language. They are involved in the digital age, so they simply don’t see English as an important goal.
  • Most learners don’t care about learning a language. Learners these days are lazy and don’t think globally.
  • Learners care about testing and getting grades, so they focus only on textbooks and fail to consider actually acquiring language.
  • Learners fail to see their resources as opportunities. They don’t connect their academic life to the world outside.

Q4. Learners can acquire language through the internet in all of these places EXCEPT:

  • songs
  • textbooks
  • television shows
  • online games

Q5. Student autonomy means that

  • students join with friends to form associations.
  • students can learn for themselves without the help of another.
  • students must be guided so that they can follow strong examples.
  • students must obey their teachers or they will make too many errors.

Q6. The metaphor that language is outside a door means…

  • that language learning can’t just happen within the walls of a classroom, but that outside of the classroom there are contexts and experiences that will help students acquire and love language.
  • that language learning is learned through a series of stages. Language learning means that you walk through a lot of different doors in order to progress.

Q7. A student is an actor means that…

  • students need to use body language and express themselves more than they need to learn vocabulary and grammar.
  • a student is empowered to move about and participate in a global society.
  • a student needs to join the theater.

Q8. In this module, we learned that language is a…

  • fish…it helps us to see ourselves as part of a larger community, like a school of fish.
  • hammer…it gives us power to share our way of thinking.
  • passport…it gives us access to visit and understand many parts of the world.

Week 5: Teach English Now! Foundational Principles Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1:Checkpoint 1

Q1. According to the lectures, why do language teachers experience high rates of teacher burnout?

  • They care too much about their students.
  • They utilize a learner-centered approach to teaching language, which requires a lot of preparation and a lot of skill.
  • They teach too many hours each day.
  • They have too many students in their classes.

Q2. What are the benefits of forming a network of teachers? Check all that apply.

  • Take advantage of the expertise of other teachers
  • Share ideas
  • Avoid having to plan lessons
  • Save time

Q3. In addition to forming networks at school, what are some other ways that teachers can network with other teachers? Check all that apply.

  • Go to coffee shops and ask if there are any teachers there
  • Join TESOL or other teacher organizations
  • Search for teacher forums and communities on the internet
  • Attend professional conferences

Quiz 2: Checkpoint 2

Q1. In Skinner and Edge’s book about self-determination, which two factors help people avoid burn-out?

  • forming a network and having a sense of control
  • sharing the workload and taking long vacations
  • changing teaching assignments often and volunteering
  • finding a support group to complain to and working less hours

Q2. What are some ways that teachers can maintain a sense of control? Check all that apply.

  • Be an agent of change.
  • Find balance between work and life.
  • Cherish the rewards of teaching
  • Focus on the things you can do, not the things you cannot.

Q3. What is meant by finding your core? Check all that apply.

  • Be sincere. Don’t pretend to believe something you don’t.
  • Know your own teaching philosophy.
  • Find a core group of friends to spend time with.
  • Find a cause or idea that you believe in.

Quiz 3: Module 5 Review quiz

Q1. What is the phenomenon known as teacher burnout?

  • Teachers put so much time and energy into their teaching that they become exhausted and leave the teaching profession.
  • Teachers feel bored by teaching the same things day after day, so they leave the profession.
  • Teachers feel burned by low salaries and leave the teaching profession.
  • Teachers feel overwhelmed by the responsibilities that come with teaching, so they leave to find an easier job.

Q2. What does the following statement mean? Teachers should be like actors, but not act.

  • Teachers should not use their hands, face and body to communicate meaning.
  • Teachers should not make their lessons more exciting or impactful by performing.
  • Teachers should not act, or pretend to believe or feel something they don’t.

Q3. What are good ways to form a network? Check all that apply.

  • Put out an advertisement.
  • Consult online forums and blogs about ESL teaching.
  • Join professional organizations.
  • Find teachers and other ESL professionals at your school site that are willing to share ideas.

Q4. What are recommended strategies for maintaining self-control over your career? Check all that apply.

  • Find a balance between work and life.
  • Refuse to teach concepts that are uninteresting to you.
  • Focus on the things you can do, and not the things you cannot.
  • Find your core teaching beliefs.

Q5. In Skinner and Edge’s book about self-determination, they recommend which two strategies to avoid burnout?

  • work shorter hours and travel
  • volunteer more time and take long vacations
  • form a network and maintain a sense of control
  • don’t over-commit and change teaching assignments often

Week 6: Teach English Now! Foundational Principles Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Final Assessment

Q1. In this course, it was stated that a principled teacher must find their core. What is meant by finding your core? Check all that apply.

  • Find a cause or idea that you believe in.
  • Be sincere. Don’t pretend to believe something you don’t.
  • Know your own teaching philosophy.
  • Tell stories about your experiences learning a language.

Q2. Much like the metaphor “language is cake,” a Harvard research study showed that students often judge a teacher in the first 6 seconds of class, based on…

  • their teaching technique
  • their use of technology
  • their content
  • their age

Q3. What does the following statement mean? Teachers should be like actors, but not act.

  • Teachers should not use their hands, face and body to communicate meaning.
  • Teachers should not make their lessons more exciting or impactful by performing.
  • Teachers should not act, or pretend to believe or feel something they don’t.

Q4. According to Glasser, the four basic psychological needs of belonging, competence, freedom and fun are the foundation for…

  • scaffolding
  • intrinsic motivation
  • language acquisition
  • extrinsic motivation

Q5. Much like an actor, good teachers use which three techniques to help make meaning clear?

  • body language, teacher talk, and scaffolding
  • the zone of proximal development, i + 1, and high technique/high content
  • elaboration, body language, and repetition
  • high technique/low content, scaffolding, and teacher talk

Q6. Vygotsky’s theory of the Zone of Proximal Development has students working slightly above their level so they feel comfortable yet challenged. To assist students in this zone, teachers offer support, or scaffolding, as they master a skill. Which learning activity includes scaffolding?

  • Read Chapter 4 and answer the chapter review questions on pg. 100.
  • Write a paragraph summarizing Chapter 4. Remember to use the summarizing techniques I mentioned in class.
  • Write a paragraph describing your favorite character from the story, using the writing frame we practiced together in class.

Write a paragraph using six of the vocabulary words from the chapter.

Q7. How is language learning like a camera?

  • Like a camera, language learning is complex and difficult to become an expert at.
  • Like a camera, language learning is delicate and easily broken.
  • Like a camera, language learning is about a single moment in time.
  • Like a camera, language learning is about zooming in to focus on the details of a language’s structure as well as zooming out to learn to use language in a wider context.

Q8. Which activity represents language learning in the wide-angle or diffuse mode?

  • Role playing a job interview
  • Using computer software to study vocabulary words
  • Practicing scripted telephone dialogues with a partner
  • Writing sentences using a new grammatical structure

Q9. How is a language teacher like a coach? (Select the BEST answer.)

  • A language teacher is like a coach because he or she teaches the rules of the game, makes everyone practice a lot of drills, and does a lot of yelling from the sidelines.
  • A language teacher is like a coach because he or she teaches the rules of the game, makes sure everyone gets plenty of opportunity to practice the game in many different ways, and encourages players to take risks and keep trying.

Q10. What is the 80/20 principle?

  • A language teacher should plan a lesson so that 20% of the time is used for focusing on the details of the language, and 80% of the time is used for students to practice the language.
  • A language teacher should plan a lesson so that students will learn 80 new vocabulary words and 20 new grammatical structures a week.
  • A language teacher should spend 80 minutes lecturing about the language rules, and then students should spend 20 minutes practicing those rules.

Q11. Which answer BEST describes how language learning is like being on stage?

  • Like being on stage, learning a new language creates a heightened sense of self-awareness, where the learner is afraid to make mistakes and is almost paralyzed with tension.
  • Like being on stage, language learning requires costumes, scripts, and a huge audience.
  • Like being on stage, language learning requires years of practice and effort to be good enough to use it.

Q12. In research studies, which strategies were good language learners found to use? Check all that apply.

  • They are not afraid to look ridiculous.
  • They prepare in advance and take notes.
  • They pay attention selectively to the most important information.
  • They find answers in multiple ways.
  • They look everything up in a dictionary.

Q13. Like a mother bird encourages her baby bird to leave the nest, how can teachers encourage student autonomy? (Check all that apply)

  • helping students recognize their language resources
  • inviting students to see themselves as part of a global community
  • empowering students to recognize language learning opportunities on the internet
  • helping students understand the importance of the classroom
  • emphasizing test scores as the goal of language learning

Q14. A student is an actor means that…

  • a student needs to join the theater.
  • students need to use body language and express themselves more than they need to learn vocabulary and grammar.
  • a student is empowered to move about and participate in a global society.

Q15. Which metaphor explains the power that is gained by learning a language?

  • Language is like a passport…it gives us access to visit and understand many parts of the world.
  • Language is like a fish…it helps us to see ourselves as part of a larger community, like a school of fish.
  • Language is like a hammer…it gives us power to establish our authority.
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