Critical Thinking Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Get All Weeks Critical Thinking Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

In this course, you will learn how to develop your Critical Thinking Skills to help you achieve success in your university studies. After completing this course, you will be able to:

1. Use critical thinking and argumentation in university contexts to improve academic results 2. Understand the importance and function of critical thinking in academic culture 3. Use a variety of thinking tools to improve critical thinking 4. Identify types of argument, and bias within arguments, in order to better evaluate the strength of arguments 5. Use evidence to support claims in arguments 6. Apply critical thinking and argumentation to real-world problems and issues.

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Week 1: Critical Thinking Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 1.1 Practice quiz

Q1. Which of the following are learning objectives for this MOOC?

Check all that apply.

  • Identify types of argument, and
    bias within arguments, in order to better evaluate the strength of arguments.
  • Critically evaluate
    the reliability of sources for an academic context.
  • Communicate clearly
    across a variety of different contexts and to a wide range of audiences by
    adapting communicative styles appropriately according to cultural and societal
    expectations.
  • Recognize the
    importance & function of problem solving & creative thought within
    academic study.
  • Understand the
    importance and function of critical thinking in academic culture.
  • Apply problem-solving
    strategies to issues related to university life & study.

Q2. Which of the following are NON-assessed activities on this MOOC?

Check all that apply.

  • Final summative
    assessment
  • In video questions
    & polls
  • Quizzes after each
    module.
  • Short quizzes after
    each lesson
  • Discussion board
    posts

Q3. What percentage of your total marks is the final summative assessment worth?

Check one option only.

  • 5%
  • 15%
  • 50%
  • 35%

Quiz 2: 1.2 Practice Quiz

Q1. Which of the following are some of the core values and expectations of academic
culture mentioned by academics in 1.2a?

Check all that apply.

  • Academic integrity
  • Freedom
  • Critical thinking
  • Intellectual inquiry and communication
  • Ethical contribution
  • The contingency of knowledge

Q2. What metaphor do Molinari and
Kavanagh (2013) use to describe critical thinking?

Check one option.

  • A slippery eel
  • A proud lion
  • A lazy sloth
  • A friendly dog

Q3. At university, what is an argument?

Check one option.

  • An angry disagreement between two people
  • An attempt to defend, validate or explain a
    conclusion using specific reasons or evidence
  • A more polite term for a fight
  • Another word for a conclusion

Quiz 3: 1.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. In lesson 1.3a, Jonathon mentions
that he learnt two valuable skills when he struggled to pass a first year
university course. What were they?

Check two options

  • Flexibility
  • Curiosity
  • Resilience
  • How to ask for help

Q2. In lesson 1.3a, why does Ben say he
felt comfortable at university?

Check one option.

  • Because he met lots of new people
  • Because he was pushed to think in new ways
  • Because it gave him the confidence to have an
    opinion

Q3. In lesson 1.3b, Jenni contrasts her
essay writing and argumentation at the beginning of her university course with
the argumentation at the end. What differences did she notice?

Check two options.

  • At the end of her course, she wrote more about
    how she felt.
  • At the end of her course, she wrote longer
    arguments.
  • At the end of her time at university, she was able to use references
    more to support her propositions.
  • At the end of her course, she made broader, more
    cohesive arguments.

Quiz 4: 1.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. Mohammed is a third year undergraduate student studying
epidemiology. His professor is highly regarded in the field and Mohammed is
very excited to study under him. While trying to replicate one of his
professor’s experiments, Mohammed notices that another student has made a
mistake while calculating the data for the experiment. In one of the equations,
one of the signs is around the wrong way. This has made the results of the
experiment seem really positive. However, when Mohammed does his calculations, he
notices that his results aren’t very good at all.

Mohammed does the calculations multiple times. He
consults a few other students, and they all come up with the same thing. It
isn’t an assignment, and students are allowed to collaborate and work together,
so Mohammed tells the student about the mistake. However, the other student
shrugs and refuses to change it because it is the same as the one used in the
original paper.

What
is Mohammed required to do?

Check one option.

  • Mohammed isn’t required to do anything.
  • He must tell the professor because the student
    is falsifying his/her results.
  • He must go to the dean of the faculty and
    accuse the other student of academic misconduct.

Q2. Consider the following situation.

Mohammed is a third year undergraduate student studying
epidemiology. His professor is highly regarded in the field and Mohammed is
very excited to study under him. However, after seeing another student use an
incorrect equation while trying to replicate one of his professor’s
experiments, Mohammed notices that his professor made a small error when
calculating the data for the original experiment. When Mohammed fixes the
error, it changes the results so much that the conclusion isn’t correct any
more. Mohammed checks the original and his own multiple times but he still gets
the same result.

Mohammed is very concerned because the paper with the
published results of the experiments his professor did has been referenced many
times.

What
should Mohammed do?

Check one option.

  • Bring this to his professor’s attention as soon
    as possible.
  • Go to the head of the school and tell her that
    his professor has been falsifying his results.
  • Do nothing. Mohammed obviously isn’t doing the
    calculations properly as his professor is much more intelligent and knows much
    more about the subject than he does.

Q3. Consider the following situation.

Mohammed is a third year undergraduate student studying
epidemiology. His professor is highly regarded in the field and Mohammed is
very excited to study under him. However, while trying to replicate one of his
professor’s experiments, Mohammed notices that his professor made a small error
when calculating the data for the original experiment. When Mohammed fixes the
error, it changes the results so much that the conclusion isn’t correct any
more. Mohammed checks the original and his own multiple times but he still gets
the same result.

Mohammed is very concerned because the paper with the
published results of the experiments his professor did has been referenced many
times.

Mohammed decides to approach his professor with the
mistake and his calculations. However, his professor tells him not to worry
about it and that “is just how science is”. His professor does nothing.

What should Mohammed do now?

Check one option.

  • Go to the head of the school and tell her that
    his professor is has been falsifying his results.
  • Do nothing. Maybe that is just how science is
    done in epidemiology.
  • Go to the head of the school and ask for their
    opinion on the situation.
  • Tell his friend who works at the university’s
    newspaper all about it, so they can write up an expose on his professor.

Quiz 5: Summative Quiz – Module 1

Q1. “A wise man … proportions his belief to the evidence.” – David Hume

What quality of academic culture does this relate to?

Check one option.

  • The contingent nature of academic knowledge
  • The need for proof to support opinions
  • The use of research to produce knowledge
  • The importance of independent learning

Q2.Consider the following situation:

For a course Timmy is taking, he has to
conduct a research experiment and write a full research report. Part of the research report is a literature
review. Timmy feels really lucky because earlier in the semester they had to
write a literature review for the same class.

Can
Timmy use the same literature review he did earlier in the course for this
assignment?

Check one option.

  • No, this would be considered self-plagiarism.
  • No, this would be considered Fabrication.
  • Definitely. If it is on the same topic for the
    same course, Timmy does not need to write the literature review again.
  • It depends; Timmy should check his course
    outline or lecturer to make sure.

Q3. Which of the following is a trait of critical thinking according to lecture 1.2b?

Check two options.

  • It is easy and carefree.
  • It reflects on its own basis, background and
    reasons.
  • It is forceful and persuasive.
  • It aims to be objective and free from bias.

Q4. How had university changed some of the people interviewed in lesson 1.3a?

Check two options.

  • It had caused them to ask people their feelings.
  • It had given them better people skills.
  • It caused them to change careers and become actors.
  • It had helped them understand communication in
    different contexts.

Q5. What is argumentation?

Check one option.

  • Taking a stance or position in relation to a
    topic
  • A set of reasons to show that a conclusion is
    valid
  • An angry disagreement
  • The process of disagreeing with someone

Quiz 6: Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 1

Q1. Remember you need to record your participation to pass this assessment item.

Did you contribute at least two posts to the discussion board(s) for this module?

Be honest. . . 🙂

  • Yes I did.
  • No I didn’t.

Week 2: Critical Thinking Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 2.1 Practice Quiz

Q1. Which of the habits of mind or dispositions discussed in lesson 2.1a is reflected in
the following quote?

“When I started thinking about my assignment question,
the first thing I did was to start applying some of the techniques that I had learnt
in my course. My lecturer had talked about a set of criteria that could be
applied to problems in my field, so I used that to start generating solutions.”

Check one option.

  • Metacognition
  • Self-confidence
  • Being systematic
  • Being open-minded

Q2. Which of the habits of mind or dispositions discussed in lesson 2.1a is reflected in
the following quote?

“The final assignment in my organisational behavior
course was a complex case study assignment about some issues in a large
company. It’s unrealistic to expect in a tricky situation such as this that
there is only one possible answer.”

Check one option.

  • Maturity
  • Truth-seeking
  • Being analytical
  • Metacognition

Q3. Which of the habits of mind or dispositions discussed in lesson 2.1a is reflected in
the following quote?

“Through my university course my lecturers really
helped me reflect on my own thinking processes. One unit in particular made me
do so using an online reflective blog. It was a bit of a pain at the time, but
I recognize now how useful it is.”

Check one option.

  • Metacognition
  • Truth-seeking
  • Being analytical
  • Inquisitiveness

Quiz 2: 2.2 Practice Quiz

Q1.Consider the following list of traits of the different spheres of argumentation.

1. Uses any example or means as evidence in arguments

2. No fixed rules for reasoning or evidence

3. Aimed at a specific audience

4. Tries to change opinions or values

5. Adheres to strict rules about data collection and analysis

6. Aimed at the general public

Which traits describe the technical sphere of argumentation?

  • 1 and 2
  • 2 and 3
  • 3 and 4
  • 3 and 5
  • 4 and 5
  • 4 and 6

Q2. Consider the following list of traits of the different spheres of argumentation.

1. Uses any example or means as evidence in arguments

2. No fixed rules for reasoning or evidence

3. Aimed at a specific audience

4. Tries to change opinions or values

5. Adheres to strict rules about data collection and analysis

6. Aimed at the general public

Which traits describe the personal sphere of argumentation?

  • 1 and 2
  • 2 and 3
  • 3 and 4
  • 3 and 5
  • 4 and 5
  • 4 and 6

Q3. Which argument sphere does the following argument belong to?

“We definitely need the new rail system in this area.
Buses are usually late, and it’s a long way to drive to the city. It’s a bit
more comfortable getting a train too I think.”

Check one option.

  • The technical sphere of argumentation
  • The private sphere of argumentation.
  • The public sphere of argumentation
  • The personal sphere of argumentation

Quiz 3: 2.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. Which of the following are characteristics of argument fields?

Check three options.

  • Shared academic discipline such as biology or law
  • Common object of study
  • Agreement on what knowledge is
  • Shared opinion on the common object of study
  • Shared processes of thought

Q2. Apart from academic disciplines, what are some other things that can define an
argument field?

Check two options.

  • School of thought
  • Faculty
  • Courtroom
  • Profession

Q3. Think back to the lesson on differences in argumentation in History and Biology. What
is an example of a difference in argumentation in the arts and social sciences
courses on the one hand, and science courses on the other?

Check one option.

  • In arts and social sciences courses students
    will generally need to engage in argumentation much earlier in their courses
    than science students.
  • In arts and social sciences courses students
    will generally need to engage in argumentation much later in their courses than
    science students.
  • In the sciences argumentation generally takes
    the form of arguing for solutions.
  • In the arts and social sciences argumentation
    generally takes the form of arguing for solutions.

Quiz 4: 2.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. What is a questioning stance, according to the lesson?

Check two options.

  • A way of standing that improves
    concentration
  • A general way of life
  • A way of approaching a text
  • A way of reading a text

Q2. Why is a questioning stance a central part of academic culture, according to Brick,
Herke and Wong (2016)?

Check one option.

  • Because students are assessed on their
    ability to adopt a questioning stance
  • Because students need to analyze the
    reliability of sources
  • Because it is a form of independent learning
  • Because argument and debate advance knowledge

Q3.Why do we need to take a questioning stance in our learning at university?

Check one option.

  • Because it is so important in academic
    culture
  • To poke holes in an argument
  • To more fully understand the topic you are
    learning
  • To avoid the ‘who cares’ questions

Quiz 5: 2.5 Summative Quiz – Module 2

Q1. Consider the following situation.

A group of engineering students are doing a
group assignment. The assignment asks them to calculate the ability of a tall
building to withstand wind, earthquakes and other potential stresses. One
student, who has worked through all the set questions and activities in class,
knows how to address the question and helps the others students complete the
assignment with assurance.

Which of the following dispositions or
habits of mind for critical thinking is the student displaying?

Check
one option.

  • Truth-seeking
  • Self-confidence
  • Inquisitiveness
  • Metacognition

Q2. Consider the following situation.

A student is asked to do a feminist
analysis of a movie. The student already has strong opinions about both
feminism and the film they must analyse. However, they make a mental note of
their biases when conducting research. The student makes sure they read
sources representing a variety of different views, rather than just their own.

Which of the following dispositions or
habits of mind for critical thinking is the student displaying?

Check
one option.

  • Being systemic in your thinking
  • Self-confidence
  • Inquisitiveness
  • Metacognition

Q3. Which argument sphere
does the following argument belong to?

“Proponents of the new rail network say that it
will reduce traffic and car emissions. What is overlooked, however, is the
enormous bill for the cost of the new rail network will present to current and future
generations, a bill that the citizens of this state will be paying off for
quite some time.”

Check one option.

  • The technical sphere of argumentation
  • The media sphere of argumentation.
  • The public sphere of argumentation.
  • The personal sphere of argumentation

Q4. Which argument sphere
does the following argument belong to?

“In contrast with many neoclassical theorists,
who see government spending as constrained, modern monetary theory (MMT) sees
government spending as relatively less limited. This is because according to
MMT the very notion of government debt is a misnomer due to the government’s
control over the fiat money supply. Thus spending on infrastructure projects is
often seen as advantageous, particularly at times of low interest rates.”

Check one option.

  • The technical sphere of argumentation
  • The academic sphere of argumentation
  • The public sphere of argumentation
  • The personal sphere of argumentation

Q5. Consider the following methodology, which
can be considered an argument field.

Conversation analysis is a well-defined
method and school of thought that analyses language from a social perspective.
It seeks to study naturally occurring talk, either in everyday conversations or
institutional settings such as schools and organizations. Any conversation
analysis must be strictly based on the actual conversation, and outside
categories (such as the race or class of the speaker) cannot be imposed unless
they are referred to in the conversation being analyzed. Conversation analysts
seek to find out what actions are performed by speakers in conversation (e.g.
telling stories, making arrangements), and how they organize their talk in
order to do that. They use a special mode of analysis to understand how actions
are performed in talk called the next
turn proof procedure. In this procedure, the action of the speaker is
understood by examining how the following speaker understood them. When discussing
the organization of talk, conversation analysts use terms such as turns,
sequence organization and repair (how speakers fix errors in their talk).

When thinking about Conversation Analysis
as an argument field, what is a specialized process of thought?

Check
one option.

  • The next turn proof procedure
  • Sequence organization and repair
  • What
    actions are performed in the talk-in-interaction, and how the talk is
    sequentially organized into turns and sequences
  • Naturally occurring talk-in-interaction.

Q6. Consider the following methodology, which
can be considered an argument field.

Conversation analysis is a well-defined
method and school of thought that analyses language from a social perspective.
It seeks to study naturally occurring talk, either in everyday conversations or
institutional settings such as schools and organizations. Any conversation
analysis must be strictly based on the actual conversation, and outside
categories (such as the race or class of the speaker) cannot be imposed unless
they are referred to in the conversation being analyzed. Conversation analysts
seek to find out what actions are performed by speakers in conversation (e.g.
telling stories, making arrangements), and how they organize their talk in
order to do that. They use a special mode of analysis to understand how actions
are performed in talk called the next
turn proof procedure. In this procedure, the action of the speaker is
understood by examining how the following speaker understood them. When
discussing the organization of talk, conversation analysts use terms such as
turns, sequence organization and repair (how speakers fix errors in their
talk).

When thinking about Conversation Analysis
as an argument field, what is object of study?

Check
one option.

  • The next turn proof procedure
  • Sequence organization and repair
  • What actions are performed in the talk-in-interaction, and how the talk is
    sequentially organized into turns and sequences
  • Naturally occurring talk-in-interaction

Q7. Consider the following abstract for an
academic journal article.

Mega-events, such as the Olympic Games and
world fairs, are a major factor in tourism development, urban revitalization,
and urban reimaging strategies. However, despite their economic, social, and
political significance, it is only within the last decade that substantial
attention has been paid to their impact and legacies. This article provides a
discussion of the scope and definition of mega-events, an analysis of the
reasons why mega-events are held, and offers an examination of the housing and
social impact of mega-events on host cities and regions with special reference
to the housing and social planning of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. The
article concludes that the focus on the economic dimension of events is often
at the expense of social, environmental, and political analyses.

(Hall, C. M., & Hodges, J. (1996). The
party’s great, but what about the hangover?: The housing and social impacts of
mega-events with special reference to the 2000 Sydney Olympics. Festival
Management and Event Tourism, 4 (1-1), 13-20.)

A student has taken a questioning stance
towards this article. Here are some of the questions he has asked of the text.

  1. “What are the qualifications of C.M.
    Hall and J. Hodges?”
  2. “How could the information included in
    this article be used to better organise mega-events in the future?”
  3. “What are the weaknesses of their position
    on the impacts of mega-events?”
  4. “Do I agree with their notion that the
    economic dimension of these events is in contradiction to environmental and
    social analyses?”
  5. “What evidence are Hall and Hodges
    using?”
  6. “Does their argument make sense?”

Which of these questions are content
questions?

Check one option.

  • 1, 2 and 3
  • 1, 5 and 6
  • 2, 3 and 4
  • 3, 4 and 6

Q8. Consider the following abstract for an
academic journal article.

Mega-events, such as the Olympic Games and
world fairs, are a major factor in tourism development, urban revitalization,
and urban reimaging strategies. However, despite their economic, social, and
political significance, it is only within the last decade that substantial
attention has been paid to their impact and legacies. This article provides a
discussion of the scope and definition of mega-events, an analysis of the
reasons why mega-events are held, and offers an examination of the housing and
social impact of mega-events on host cities and regions with special reference
to the housing and social planning of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. The
article concludes that the focus on the economic dimension of events is often
at the expense of social, environmental, and political analyses.

(Hall, C. M., & Hodges, J. (1996). The
party’s great, but what about the hangover?: The housing and social impacts of
mega-events with special reference to the 2000 Sydney Olympics. Festival
Management and Event Tourism, 4(1-1), 13-20.)

A student has taken a questioning stance
towards this article. Here are some of the questions he has asked of the text.

  1. “What are the qualifications of C.M.
    Hall and J. Hodges?”
  2. “How could the information included in
    this article be used to better organise mega-events in the future?”
  3. “What are the weaknesses of their
    position on the impacts of mega-events?”
  4. “Do I agree with their notion that the
    economic dimension of these events is in contradiction to environmental and
    social analyses?”
  5. “What evidence are Hall and Hodges
    using?”
  6. “Does their argument make sense?”

Which of these questions are context
questions?

Check one option.

  • 1, 2 and 3
  • 1, 5 and 6
  • 2, 3 and 4
  • 3, 4 and 6

Quiz 6 : Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 2

Q1. Remember you need to record your participation to pass this assessment item.

Did you contribute at least two posts to the discussion board for this module?

Be honest. . . 🙂

  • a. Yes, I did.
  • b. No, I didn’t.

Week 3: Critical Thinking Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 3.1 Practice Quiz

Q1. Have a look at the following statement. Which sentence is the conclusion?

I have the right to leave work after lunch. According
to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, article 24, everyone has the
right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours. I
have been working an unreasonable amount of hours.

Check one option.

  • The first sentence
  • The second sentence
  • The third sentence

Q2. Have a look at the following argument. What is one problem with the argument?

According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,
article 24, everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable
limitation of working hours. I have been working an unreasonable amount of
hours. Therefore, I have the right to leave work after lunch.

Check one option.

  • The conclusion doesn’t logically follow the
    premises.
  • The premises are not logically connected.
  • The first premise is not valid.
  • The second premise is not strong, because the
    definition of ‘reasonable’ is unclear and needs to be further illustrated.

Q3. Have a look at the following argument. What is the problem with the conclusion?

I have the right to leave work after lunch. According
to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, article 24, everyone has the
right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours. I
have been working an unreasonable amount of hours.

  • The conclusion comes before the premises.
  • The conclusion is not the most logical result
    of the premises.
  • The conclusion does not follow from the
    premises.

Quiz 2: 3.2 Practice Quiz

Q1. Have a look at the following passage. What is wrong with the argument?

Every morning, as it gets closer to midday, the
temperature rises. At the same time, I always start to feel hungry. Therefore,
an increase in temperature makes me hungry.

Check one option.

  • It assumes that there is a cause-effect
    relationship between the two trends.
  • It draws a conclusion based on too few
    examples.
  • It misrepresents the original argument.

Q2. Which of the following statements can be considered hasty generalizations?

Check one option.

  • All generalizations are bad.
  • All homeless people are unemployed.
  • Winter months are colder than Summer months.

Q3. Have a look at the following passage. What is wrong with the counter-argument?

Argument: Research suggests that restorative and reparative
punishments, such as community-service sentences, result in a reduction of
repeat offenders. This is particularly the case for minor, non-violent
offenses. The justice system should reduce the amount of prison sentences and
increase the number of community-service sentences for minor, non-violent
offences.*

Counter-argument: According to crime statistics,
between 50% and 60% of all released prisoners will re-offend. If you take
criminals out of jail and let them free on the street you will be putting innocent
people’s lives in danger.*

*Arguments are fictional

Check one option.

  • It assumes that there is a cause effect
    relationship between the two trends.
  • It draws a conclusion based on too little
    evidence.
  • It misrepresents the original argument.

Quiz 3: 3.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. What is one of the downsides to using deductive reasoning in a university context?

Check one option.

  • Deductive reasoning needs to use strong, fixed
    language and this means it can be more easily attacked and disproven than other
    forms of reasoning.
  • Deductive reasoning is weaker than other forms
    of reasoning.
  • Deductive reasoning uses probabilities and is
    therefore not always true.

Q2. What are the two main types of reasoning that you find at university?

Check two options.

  • Reasoning using generalizations.
  • Reasoning that moves from theory to practice
  • Reasoning using probabilities
  • Reasoning that moves from specific observations
    to general conclusions
  • Reasoning that moves from general statements to specific
    conclusions.

Q3. Consider the following argument:

The Artape people have lived on the island of Staples for between 20,000 and 25,000 years. A number of archaeological sites have been radiocarbon dated to around 19,000 BC, although there is evidence of some tools being used by hunters as early as 23,000 BC. They are thought to have migrated across from Africa on land bridges that existed before the last ice age. Archaeological evidence, such as oral stories, rock pictures and some ancient fossils, suggests that there was trade between the main land and the smaller island across these land bridges, but this stopped when the seas rose around 12,000 years ago.*

*Fictional people & history

What kind of reasoning is evident here?

Check one option.

  • This is an example of reasoning from specific
    observations to general conclusions.
  • This is an example of reasoning from general
    observations to specific conclusions.
  • This is an example of reasoning using
    probabilities.

Quiz 4: 3.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. What is the problem with the following ‘laundry list’ approach to the issue of
homelessness?

Mental health issues >

Poverty > homelessness

Unemployment >

Check two options.

  • The list only indicates a one way
    relationship between the causes and effect.
  • The factors are not related to each other.
  • The factors are not relevant.
  • The list doesn’t demonstrate the relationship
    between each factor and how they are related.

Q2. How can re-framing the following statement as a cycle (or a ‘feedback loop’) help create
a better understanding of the issue?

Mental health issues, unemployment and poverty are all
factors that lead to homelessness.

Check two options.

  • It demonstrates that the factors are all
    inter-related and therefore a solution that addresses only one factor would not
    be sufficient to solve the issue.
  • Thinking in terms of a cycle shows that it is
    not only a cause-effect relationship, and that homelessness itself can
    contribute to the factors of mental health issues, unemployment and poverty as
    well.
  • It shows that all factors are equally
    important.

Q3. As well as the benefits mentioned in regards to the feedback loop above, why else
would it be useful to see the issue of homelessness through a systems thinking
perspective, looking at the issue as a web of interrelated components?

Check two options.

  • To be able to see what occurs between each of
    the individual components
  • It helps understand the complexity of the
    issue and to see the bigger picture.
  • To see how complex and confusing everything is
  • To be able to see how insignificant
    individual factors are overall

Quiz 5: Summative Quiz – Module 3

Q1. Have a look at the following argument based on an
advertisement. What are the implicit (unspoken) premises?

There are many young, beautiful people on a beach having fun. They are drinking Cool
Cola. You should buy Cool Cola.

Check two options.

  • That Cool Cola makes the young, beautiful
    people in the advertisement happy
  • That the young people are actors hired to promote
    Cool Cola
  • That if you buy Cool Cola you will also be
    young, beautiful and happy
  • That Cool Cola is high in sugar and should only
    be drunk in moderation

Q2. Have a look at the following
argument. What is the problem with the conclusion?

Cool
Cola makes people happy. There are many young, beautiful people on a beach
having fun. They are drinking Cool Cola.

Check
one option.

  • The conclusion comes before the premise.
  • The conclusion does not follow from the
    premises.
  • The conclusion is not the most logical result
    of the premises.

Q3. Consider the following argument:

The Artape people have lived on the island of Staples for between 20,000 and 31,000
years. A number of archaeological sites have been radiocarbon dated to around
20,000 BC. They are thought to have migrated across from Africa on land bridges
that existed before the last ice age. Movement between the main land and
Staples across these land bridges was quite common. Archaeological evidence,
such as oral stories, rock pictures and some ancient fossils, suggests that the
Staler people, the ancestors of the Artape, used the island for hunting from as
far back as 31,000 BC. However, there is no evidence of settlement or
continuous habitation of the island until around 25,000 BC, when evidence of temporary
camps starts. It is not until 20,000 BC that we start to see evidence of permanent
dwellings. All migration from the main
land to Stapes stopped when the seas rose around 12,000 years ago. *

*Fictional
peoples & History

What is the conclusion of this argument?

Check one option.

  • The Artape people and their ancestors have lived
    on the island of Staples for between 20,000 and 31,000 years.
  • Movement between the main land and Staples
    across these land bridges was quite common.
  • All migration from the main land to Staples
    stopped when the seas rose around 12,000 years ago.
  • Archaeological evidence, such as oral stories,
    rock pictures and some ancient fossils, suggests that the Staler people, the
    ancestors of the Artape, used the island for hunting from as far back as 31,000
    BC.

Q4. People lived on the island of Staples as far back as 19,000 BC. Man-made artifacts
have been found at a number of archaeological sites. These man-made artifacts
have been carbon dated to 19,000 BC. For example, a partial leg bone of a juvenile
marsupial herbivore was discovered at one of the sites. This partial leg bone
has been sharpened into a bone point. There is clear evidence of sharp stone
tools being used to refine the bone, which were also found at the site. The
fossil has no carnivore tooth marks on it and was found in a shelter on a steep
escarpment unsuitable for climbing by this kind of marsupial herbivore. Only humans have the capability and dexterity
to make and use these kinds of tools. This leg bone tool, therefore, was made
by humans. This serves as evidence that humans lived on the island of Staples
as far back as 19,000 BC. *

*Fictional
historical account

What kind of formal reasoning is being used
in this example?

Check one option.

  • This is an example of reasoning from specific
    observations to general conclusions.
  • This is an example of reasoning from general
    observations to specific conclusions.
  • This is an example of reasoning that combines
    general and specific observations to make a general conclusion.
  • This is an example of reasoning using
    probabilities.

Q5. Have a look at the following
passage. What is wrong with the argument?

During
the 2000s smart phone sales and ownership increased dramatically. At the same
time, warfare in the Middle East escalated. It is clear that smart phones usage
was a main contributor to the intensity of international warfare in the
2000s.

Check one option.

  • It assumes that there is a cause-effect
    relationship between the two trends.
  • It draws a conclusion based on too few examples.
  • It misrepresents the original argument.

Q6. Have a look at the following
passage. What is wrong with the counter-argument?

Argument:
Sometimes when you are having trouble writing your assignment it is good to
take a short break.

Counter-argument:
Procrastinating instead of doing your work means nothing will ever get done.

Check
one option.

  • It assumes that there is a cause effect
    relationship between the two trends.
  • It draws a conclusion based on too few examples.
  • It misrepresents the original argument.

Q7. What problems are there with the following ‘laundry list’ approach to the following issue:

Too many private cars

=>

Inadequate public transport

=>

congestion

Insufficient road networks

=>

Check two options.

  • It doesn’t provide any solutions to the problem.
  • It suggests that there are only three causes
    that contribute to the issue.
  • It suggests a one-way relationship between the
    causes and the effect.
  • It suggests that each factor is of equal
    importance.

Q8. How can re-framing the following
statement as a cycle (or a ‘feedback loop’) help create a better understanding
of the issue?

Too many private cars, inadequate public transport and insufficient road networks
are all factors that lead to congestion.

Check two options.

  • It shows that any solution would have to address
    all of the factors that contribute to the issue.
  • Representing the situation as a cycle allows us
    to see how minor each individual factor is in the overall scheme of things.
  • It shows that each factor equally contributes to
    the issue.
  • Representing the situation as a cycle shows how
    the factors are interdependent and can effect each other.

Quiz 6: Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 3

Q1. Remember you need to record your participation to pass this assessment item.

Did you contribute at least two posts to the discussion board for this module?

Be honest. . . 🙂

  • Yes, I did.
  • No, I didn’t.

Week 4: Critical Thinking Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 4.1 Practice Quiz

Q1. Is the following sentence a claim or evidence?

Homelessness is still a major issue in Australia
because policy makers haven’t made a concerted effort to fund and commit to one
particular project for an appropriate length of time.

Check one option.

  • A claim
  • Evidence
  • Both a claim and evidence

Q2. Analyze the following paragraph. What is the origin
of the evidence?

Homelessness is still a major issue in Australia
because policy makers haven’t made a concerted effort to fund and commit to one
particular project for an appropriate length of time. This is clear from
research that has analyzed the history of homelessness programs in recent
years. Parsell, Jones & Head draw on an extensive list of published
articles and government reports analyzing homelessness programs in the UK, USA
and Australia to conclude that “[a]ttracted by the successes in the UK and USA,
Australian policy makers attempted a piecemeal transfer making it unlikely that
the goal of permanently ending homelessness will be achieved” (Parsell, Jones
& Head, 2012)

Reference:

Parsell,
C., Jones, A. and Head, B. (2013). Policies
and programs to end homelessness in Australia: Learning from international
practice. International Journal of Social
Welfare, 13, 10–23.

Check one option

  • The arguer’s personal experience
  • Anecdotal experience that the arguer heard
    from others
  • The authors’ personal experience
  • The authors’ interpretation of other people’s
    experience

Q3. Analyse the following paragraph. What is the mode
of the evidence?

Homelessness is still a major issue in Australia
because policy makers haven’t made a concerted effort to fund and commit to one
particular project for an appropriate length of time. This is clear from
research that has analyzed the history of homelessness programs in recent
years. Parsell, Jones & Head draw on an extensive list of published
articles and government reports analyzing homelessness programs in the UK, USA
and Australia to arrive at the conclusion that “attracted by the successes in
the UK and USA, Australian policy makers attempted a piecemeal transfer making
it unlikely that the goal of permanently ending homelessness will be achieved”
(Parsell, Jones & Head, 2012).

Reference:

Parsell,
C., Jones, A. and Head, B. (2013). Policies and programs to end homelessness
in Australia: Learning from international practice. International Journal of Social Welfare, 13, 10–23.

Check one option.

  • Print media
  • Electronic media
  • Verbal communication

Q4. Analyze the following paragraph. What is the purpose
of the evidence?

Homelessness is still a major issue in Australia
because policy makers haven’t made a concerted effort to fund and commit to one
particular project for an appropriate length of time. This is clear from
research that has analyzed the history of homelessness programs in recent
years. Parsell, Jones & Head draw on an extensive list of published
articles and government reports analyzing homelessness programs in the UK, USA
and Australia to arrive at the conclusion that “attracted by the successes in
the UK and USA, Australian policy makers attempted a piecemeal transfer making
it unlikely that the goal of permanently ending homelessness will be achieved”
(Parsell, Jones & Head, 2012).

Reference:

Parsell,
C., Jones, A. and Head, B. (2013). Policies and programs to end homelessness
in Australia: Learning from international practice. International Journal of Social Welfare, 13, 10–23.

Check one option.

  • Academic
  • Non-academic

Q5. Analyze the following paragraph. What is the source
of the evidence?

Homelessness is still a major issue in Australia
because policy makers haven’t made a concerted effort to fund and commit to one
particular project for an appropriate length of time. This is clear from
research that has analyzed the history of homelessness programs in recent
years. Parsell, Jones & Head draw on an extensive list of published
articles and government reports analyzing homelessness programs in the UK, USA
and Australia to arrive at the conclusion that “attracted by the successes in
the UK and USA, Australian policy makers attempted a piecemeal transfer making
it unlikely that the goal of permanently ending homelessness will be achieved”
(Parsell, Jones & Head, 2012).

Reference:

Parsell, C., Jones, A. and Head, B. (2013). Policies and programmes to end
homelessness in Australia: Learning from international practice. International Journal of Social Welfare, 13,
10–23

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Tertiary

Quiz 2: 4.2 Practice Quiz

Q1. What is the difference between a bias and an assumption?

Check
one option.

  • A bias is a form of stereotype while an
    assumption is a type of evidence.
  • A bias is a type of evidence while an
    assumption is a form of stereotype.
  • A bias is a type claim with no evidence and
    an assumption is a prejudice for or against someone or something.
  • A bias is a prejudice for or against someone
    or something and an assumption is a type of claim with no evidence.

Q2. Consider the following statement.

We can see three types of homeless living on the streets of Albuquerque. There are
those poor souls that are homeless due to bad luck; there are drunkards and
drug addicts; and there are inveterate criminals.

What is the main kind of bias present?

Check one option.

  • False classification scheme
  • Bias is hidden in language.
  • Use of an ad hominem
  • Positioning the reader in the same in-group

Q3. What kind of bias is present in the following statement?

The key to solving homelessness is social housing.

Check one option.

  • Use of logical connectors creates bias
  • Positioning the reader in the same in-group
  • Use of emotive language
  • Use of certain or definitive language

Quiz 3: 4.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. What problem is there with the following evidence?

Homelessness is an increasingly worrying problem in the
USA. According to Langdon and Kass (1985), “[homelessness] is a national crisis
of ever-increasing proportions. Hundreds of thousands of persons across the
country are so desperately poor that they lack even minimal shelter” (p.305).
They state that there are more homeless people now than any time since the
Great Depression.

Reference:

Langdon,
J. K. & Kass, M.A. (1985). Homelessness in America: Looking for the Right
to Shelter. Columbia Journal of Law and Social Problems, 19(3), 305-392.

Choose one option.

  • Reliability
  • Sample size
  • Currency
  • Relevance

Q2. What questions can you ask to determine if the evidence is relevant to the
conclusion?

Check two options.

  • Does the evidence support the conclusion?
  • If I took the evidence away, would it make a
    difference to the conclusion?
  • Does the evidence seem convincing?
  • Is the evidence old and out-of-date?

Q3. What problem is there with the following argument?

There are more homeless people now than at any time
since the Great Depression. The Great Depression ended with the onset of World
War II. Therefore, a similar momentous event is needed to end the current
plight of homelessness.

Check two options.

  • Nothing. It is a good argument.
  • The premises are false.
  • The link between the two premises is only a
    correlation, not a causal relationship.
  • The conclusion is not the most logical
    outcome from the premises.

Quiz 4: 4.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. Consider the following statement.

“In
the case of some areas of the internet that are heavily regulated, online trade
has suffered from excess government regulation and control. It’s not hard to
imagine the same thing happening if that kind of control was extended to all
areas of the online economy.”

What
type of argument is this?

Check one option.

  • Argument from analogy
  • Generalization
  • Causal argument
  • Quasilogical argument

Q2. Consider the following statement.

“There
are many vulnerable children on the internet outside government protection, but
vulnerable children need the government to protect them, so more government
surveillance is needed.”

What
type of argument is this?

Check one option.

  • Argument from analogy
  • Generalization
  • Causal argument
  • Quasilogical argument

Q3. Consider the following statement.

“A failure to act on threats made on social media sites by both the government and
authorities has led to female users abandoning certain sites.”

What
type of argument is this?

Check one option.

  • Argument from analogy
  • Generalization
  • Causal argument
  • Quasilogical argument

Quiz 5: Summative Quiz – Module 4

Q1. Consider the following argument.

Young
people in lowly-paid jobs need to be given rental assistance from the
government. They also need to get paid more by their employers. Perhaps
employers could receive tax breaks from the government, which they could then
pass on to young employees as higher wages.

Which
of the following statements, about the claims and evidence in this argument,
are true?

Check two options.

  • ‘Employers getting tax breaks from the
    government’ is a form of evidence in this argument.
  • Rental assistance is necessary for lowly-paid
    poor people’ is a claim of this argument.
  • The origin of the evidence in this argument
    is not clearly stated.
  • No evidence is presented in this argument.

Q2. Consider the following argument.

Homelessness
is often considered the preserve of the middle-aged, but it also falls heavily
on young people. In the Springton area, for example, quite a few homeless
people can be observed, particularly in the area bound by Holroyd and 4th
St.

What
is the origin of the evidence?

Check one option.

  • Non-academic
  • Primary
  • Verbal communication
  • Personal experience

Q3. Consider the following statement.

The
laws were criticised as being ‘out of touch’ and ‘antiquated’.

How
is bias displayed in this statement?

Check one option.

  • False classification schemes
  • Use of passive voice to hide responsibility
  • Ad hominem
  • Appealing to membership of a common group

Q4. Consider the following statement.

The
treatment of homeless people is a sad indictment on this government and its
policies.

How
is bias displayed in this statement?

Check one option.

  • Use of emotive language
  • Ad hominem
  • Appealing to membership of a common group
  • Use of logical connectors and appealing to
    membership of a common group

Q5. Consider the following argument.

All pugs are dogs. Dogs are good
pets. All dogs are mammals. Therefore, all pugs are mammals.

What questions can you ask to determine if the evidence is relevant to the conclusion in the following statement?

Check two options.

  • Is the evidence old and out-of-date?
  • If I took the evidence away, would it make a
    difference to the conclusion?
  • Does the evidence seem convincing?
  • Does the evidence support the conclusion?

Q6. What problem is there with the following argument?

I have all my best ideas in the
shower. I need to regularly have good ideas when I am at work. Therefore, I
need to have numerous showers during the day in order to perform well at work.

Check one options.

  • Nothing. It is a good argument.
  • The premises are false.
  • The premises are not connected.
  • The conclusion is not the most logical
    outcome from the premises.

Q7. Consider the following argument.

Social
housing should be considered an opportunity to move past current market-based
methods of organizing shelter for people, rather than as a burden for
governments.

What
type of argument is this?

Check one option.

  • Dissociation argument
  • Co-existential argument
  • Generalization
  • Causal argument

Q8. Consider the following argument.

The current crisis with homelessness in Dartshire, our sister city in so many ways,
is an important lesson to us here. The same problem could well occur here too
if city hall doesn’t provide more options for those without accommodation in
the near future.

What
type of argument is this?

Check one option.

  • Quasilogical argument
  • Generalization
  • Co-existential argument
  • Argument from analogy

Quiz 6: Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 4

Q1. Remember you need to record your participation to pass this assessment item.

Did you contribute at least two posts to the discussion board for this module?

Be honest. . . 🙂

  • Yes, I did.
  • No, I didn’t.

Week 6: Critical Thinking Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 5.1 Practice Quiz

Q1. Read the following argument. Identify which sentences are part of the argument chain.

(1) A significant percentage of people experiencing
homelessness are aged between 0-24 years of age. (2) One contributing factor
for youth homelessness is a lack of exit planning after leaving statutory care,
juvenile justice or medical facilities. (3) If there was increased funding for
exit planning then youth at risk would have more opportunities for support. (4)
If there were more opportunities for support then there would be a higher
chance of intervention when at-risk youth face homelessness. (5) This would
lead to a decrease in youth homelessness. (6) Therefore, funding for better
exit planning would lead to a decrease in youth homelessness.

Check one option.

  • Every sentence
  • Sentences 1, 2 and 3
  • Sentences 3, 4 and 5
  • Sentences 3, 4, 5 and 6

Q2.Read the following argument. Is sentence (5) an appropriate sentence for a chain
argument?

(1) A significant percentage of people experiencing
homelessness are aged between 0-24 years of age. (2) One contributing factor
for youth homelessness is a lack of exit planning after leaving statutory care,
juvenile justice or medical facilities. (3) If there was increased funding for
exit planning then youth at risk would have more opportunities for support. (4)
If there were more opportunities for support then there would be a higher
chance of intervention when at-risk youth face homelessness. (5) This would
lead to a decrease in youth homelessness. (6) Therefore, funding for better
exit planning would lead to a decrease in youth homelessness.

Check one option.

  • Yes, because it is a conclusion to the
    argument.
  • Yes, because it links the previous premise
    with a new premise.
  • No, because the antecedent (the 2nd
    part) of sentence 4 does not become the precedent (1st part) of sentence 5.
  • No, because it doesn’t use ‘if’ in the
    precedent (1st part of the sentence).

Q3. Read the following statement. What is the purpose of the argument?

If there was increased funding for exit planning for
youth leaving statutory care, juvenile justice or medical facilities then there
would be a decrease in youth homelessness. There is not increased funding, so there
will not be a decrease in youth homelessness.

Choose one option.

  • To prove a point
  • To refute an idea
  • To warn the audience of a terrible mistake
  • Slippery slope

Q4. Read the following statement. What is the problem with the conclusion?

If there was increased funding for exit planning for
youth leaving statutory care, juvenile justice or medical facilities then there
would be a decrease in youth homelessness. There is not increased funding, so
there will not be a decrease in youth homelessness.

Check
two options.

  • It is not the most logical outcome of the
    premise.
  • It does not use necessary hedging, or
    cautious, language.
  • Nothing, it is a good argument.
  • The conclusion is not a logical consequence
    of the premises.

Q5. Read the following statement. What is wrong with the argument?

If there is no funding for exit planning for young
people leaving juvenile justice then those at-risk youth will not have adequate
support or stability. If they don’t have adequate support or stability they
will not be able to focus on their studies. If those youth are unable to focus
on their studies they will drop out of school. If they drop out of school they
will not be able to gain employment or be engaged meaningfully. This would lead
them to a life of petty crime and worse.

Check two options.

  • The premises do not logically follow each
    other.
  • The premises do not present the most logical
    progression.
  • There are too many generalizations and
    assumptions for the argument to be convincing.
  • There is no conclusion.

Quiz 2: 5.2 Practice Quiz

Q1. Consider the following argument.

Homeless people should be allowed to occupy unused
buildings that are owned by others (commonly referred to as “squatting”), as there
are an estimated 700 000 empty properties in England that could be used as
shelter. Any right that owners may claim to property is superseded by the
rights of homeless people to shelter, as the right to shelter is an inalienable
human right. This right to shelter applies in almost all cases of unoccupied
properties, but of course would not apply if the property was only unoccupied
in the short term.

(Adapted
from Vasudevan, A. (2011, November 3). The sinister logic behind criminalising
squatting. The Guardian. Retrieved
from https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/nov/03/criminalising-squatting-law-trespass-homeless)

“Any right that owners may claim to property is superseded by the rights of homeless
people to shelter” is which part of the Toulmin model of argumentation?

Check one option.

  • Backing
  • Evidence
  • Qualifier
  • Warrant

Q2. Consider the following argument.

Homeless people should be allowed to occupy unused
buildings that are owned by others (commonly referred to as “squatting”), as
there are an estimated 700 000 empty properties in England that could be used
as shelter. Any right that owners may claim to property is superseded by the
rights of homeless people to shelter, as the right to shelter is an inalienable
human right. This right to shelter applies in almost all cases of unoccupied
properties, but of course would not apply if the property was only unoccupied
in the short term.

(Adapted
from Vasudevan, A. (2011, November 3). The sinister logic behind criminalising
squatting. The Guardian. Retrieved
from https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/nov/03/criminalising-squatting-law-trespass-homeless)

“This
right to shelter applies in almost all cases of unoccupied properties” is which
part of the Toulmin model of argumentation?

Check one option.

  • Evidence
  • Rebuttal
  • Claim
  • Qualifier

Q3. Consider the following argument.

Homeless people should be allowed to occupy unused
buildings that are owned by others (commonly referred to as “squatting”), as
there are an estimated 700 000 empty properties in England that could be used
as shelter. Any right that owners may claim to property is superseded by the
rights of homeless people to shelter, as the right to shelter is an inalienable
human right. This right to shelter applies in almost all cases of unoccupied
properties, but of course would not apply if the property was only unoccupied
in the short term.

(Adapted
from Vasudevan, A. (2011, November 3). The sinister logic behind criminalising
squatting. The Guardian. Retrieved
from
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/nov/03/criminalising-squatting-law-trespass-homeless)

“The
right to shelter is an inalienable human right” is which part of the Toulmin
model of argumentation?

Check one option.

  • Backing
  • Claim
  • Evidence
  • Rebuttal

Quiz 3: 5.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. Which of the following are characteristics JUST of critique?

Check three options.

  • A structural rather than just an individual
    worldview
  • Focussing on power and inequality
  • Socially and politically active
  • Questioning assumptions

Q2. A common focus of critique is on unjust ideologies. Which of the following views
on unjust ideologies are features of critique, according to the lecture?

Check two options.

  • The influence of unjust ideologies can be
    seen in thinking and theory itself.
  • Unjust ideologies are created by individuals
    who want to control the people.
  • Unjust ideologies help maintain unequal power
    structures.
  • Unjust ideologies are only found in politics.

Q3. In which of the following faculties would you be more likely to find critique as a
way of understanding and analyzing the world?

Check two options.

  • Education
  • Biology
  • Literary Studies
  • Computer Science

Quiz 4: 5.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. Which of the following should you include in a reflection?

Check four options.

  • Review and analysis of a topic, practice, theory
    or experience
  • Questions about a topic, practice, theory or
    experience
  • A detailed description of your day leading up
    the specific experience
  • Research and evidence
  • In-depth critical analysis of an argument
  • Possible answers or solutions

Q2. Consider the following reflection from a university course in Education. Note that this
particular reflection had a word limit of 200-550 words, and students were
instructed to reflect on the idea of being a critically reflective
teacher.

Stephen Brookfield (1995), in his analysis of why
critical reflection is important to teaching, suggests that “an uncritical
stance towards our practice sets us up for a lifetime of frustration” (para.
2). He suggests this is because teachers
can have a different view of their classrooms to what is actually going on:
they are unaware. This contradiction fascinates me. While on my prac
placements, I was particularly conscious of this – lessons that I thought to be
fantastic or boring, when looked at through a critical eye, turned out to be
the opposite, or at least more in the middle. It was frustrating, to say the
least. What we had learnt in our education theory courses didn’t quite match up
to real-life experience. Having my supervisor give me notes at the end really
helped me in evaluating my teaching and planning the next lesson. This, coupled
with my own observations of my students allowed me to more closely align what
Brookfield would call the “meaning and significance” (para 2) I intended for
the lesson to what the students took from it. While being observed sometimes
felt a bit “big brother” and sometimes just embarrassing, I have no doubt that
it made me a better teacher. These kinds of ‘learning processes’ throughout a
teaching career are important because they force us to revaluate our practice;
to, in effect, become aware.

Brookfield, S. (1995). Becoming a critically reflective teacher. San Francisco, LA:
Jossey-Bass.

Now,
consider just this section: “While on my prac placements, I was
particularly conscious of this – lessons that I thought to be fantastic or
boring, when looked at through a critical eye, turned out to be the opposite,
or at least more in the middle. It was frustrating, to say the least.”

Which stage
of Baker’s (1996) critical reflection is this an example of?

  • Significance
  • Identification & description
  • Implications

Q3. Consider the same reflection from a university course in Education. Note that this
particular reflection had a word limit of 200-550 words, and students were
instructed to reflect on the idea of being a critically reflective
teacher.

Stephen Brookfield (1995), in his analysis of why
critical reflection is important to teaching, suggests that “an uncritical
stance towards our practice sets us up for a lifetime of frustration” (para
2). He suggests this is because teachers
can have a different view of their classrooms to what is actually going on:
they are unaware. This contradiction fascinates me. While on my prac
placements, I was particularly conscious of this – lessons that I thought to be
fantastic or boring, when looked at through a critical eye, turned out to be
the opposite, or at least more in the middle. It was frustrating, to say the
least. What we had learnt in our education theory courses didn’t quite match up
to real-life experience. Having my supervisor give me notes at the end really
helped me in evaluating my teaching and planning the next lesson. This, coupled
with my own observations of my students allowed me to more closely align what
Brookfield would call the “meaning and significance” (para 2) I intended for
the lesson to what the students took from it. While being observed sometimes
felt a bit “big brother” and sometimes just embarrassing, I have no doubt that
it made me a better teacher. These kinds of ‘learning processes’ throughout a
teaching career are important because they force us to revaluate our practice;
to, in effect, become aware.

Brookfield, S. (1995). Becoming a critically reflective teacher. San Francisco, LA:
Jossey-Bass.

Now,
consider just this section: “While being observed sometimes felt
a bit “big brother” and sometimes just embarrassing, I have no doubt that it
made me a better teacher. These kinds of ‘learning processes’ throughout a
teaching career are important because they force us to revaluate our practice;
to, in effect, become aware.”

Which stage
of Baker’s (1996) critical reflection is this an example of?

  • Identification & description
  • Significance
  • Implications

Quiz 5: Summative Quiz – Module 5

Q1. Read the following argument. Which sentences are part of the argument chain?

(1) Better data on homelessness
would ultimately contribute to a decrease in homelessness. (2) There is
currently a need for a client information system that would help provide
assessment, referrals and information sharing across the multiple homelessness
services. (3) Improved communication across the different services would ensure
that the clients’ needs are being addressed. (4) Moreover, improved data would
help identify which services are most in demand. (5) If the in-demand services
were identified then it would mean greater resources could be allocated to
those areas. (6) This would allow for greater outreach to homeless people with
services that they need. (7) If this was successful then it would mean more
people experiencing homelessness received the support that they needed.

Check one option.

  • All of them
  • 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
  • 1, 4, 5, 6 and 7
  • 4, 5, 6 and 7

Q2. Read the following argument. Which sentence is the conclusion?

(1) Better data on homelessness
would ultimately contribute to a decrease in homelessness. (2) There is
currently a need for a client information system that would help provide
assessment, referrals and information sharing across the multiple homelessness
services. (3) Improved communication across the different services would ensure
that the clients’ needs are being addressed. (4) Moreover, improved data would
help identify which services are most in demand. (5) If the in-demand services
were identified then it would mean greater resources could be allocated to
those areas. (6) This would allow for greater outreach to homeless people with
services that they need. (7) If this outreach was successful then it would mean
more people experiencing homelessness received the support that they needed.

Check one option.

  • (1)
  • (2)
  • (3)
  • (4)
  • (5)
  • (6)
  • (7)

Q3. For a piece of reflective writing, where should you begin?

Check one option.

  • With something you have recently learned
  • In front of the mirror
  • With an object
  • With an experience or event that raised
    questions or demonstrated a gap in your knowledge

Q4. Consider the following reflection from a university course in Education. Note that this
particular reflection had a word limit of 200-550 words, and students were
instructed to reflect on the idea of being a critically reflective
teacher.

Stephen Brookfield (1995), in his analysis
of why critical reflection is important to teaching, suggests that “an
uncritical stance towards our practice sets us up for a lifetime of
frustration” (para 2). He suggests this
is because teachers can have a different view of their classrooms to what is
actually going on: they are unaware. This contradiction fascinates me. While on
my prac placements, I was particularly conscious of this – lessons that I
thought to be fantastic or boring, when looked at through a critical eye,
turned out to be the opposite, or at least more in the middle. It was
frustrating, to say the least. What we had learnt in our education theory
courses didn’t quite match up to real-life experience. Having my supervisor
give me notes at the end really helped me in evaluating my teaching and
planning the next lesson. This, coupled with my own observations of my students
allowed me to more closely align what Brookfield would call the “meaning and
significance” (para 2) I intended for the lesson to what the students took from
it. While being observed sometimes felt a bit “big brother” and sometimes just
embarrassing, I have no doubt that it made me a better teacher. These kinds of
‘learning processes’ throughout a teaching career are important because they
force us to revaluate our practice; to, in effect, become aware.

Brookfield, S. (1995). Becoming a
critically reflective teacher. San Francisco, LA: Jossey-Bass.

Which
of the following sections of the text does the student talk about the significance of the event or experience?

Check
two options.

  • While on my prac placements, I was particularly
    conscious of this – lessons that I thought to be fantastic or boring, when
    looked at through a critical eye, turned out to be the opposite, or at least
    more in the middle. It was frustrating, to say the least.
  • What we had learnt in our education theory courses
    didn’t quite match up to real-life experience. Having my supervisor give me
    notes at the end really helped me in evaluating my teaching and planning the
    next lesson. This, coupled with my own observations of my students allowed me
    to more closely align what Brookfield would call the “meaning and significance”
    (para 2) I intended for the lesson to what the students took from it.
  • While being observed sometimes felt a bit “big
    brother” and sometimes just embarrassing, I have no doubt that it made me a
    better teacher. These kinds of ‘learning processes’ throughout a teaching
    career are important because they force us to re-evaluate our practice; to, in
    effect, become aware.
  • Stephen Brookfield (1995), in his analysis of
    why critical reflection is important to teaching, suggests that “an uncritical
    stance towards our practice sets us up for a lifetime of frustration” (para
    2). He suggests this is because teachers
    can have a different view of their classrooms to what is actually going on:
    they are unaware. This contradiction fascinates me.

Q5. Consider the following argument.

There are
numerous examples of people struggling to remove squatters due to the
inadequacy of the law. For example, Imran Lakhani, despite finding squatters on
his property while working overseas, struggled for 6 months to remove the
squatters in his house. Dale Morrison faced similar issues too when she and her
family returned from holiday to find squatters in their house. These cases
clearly demonstrate that laws against squatting on private property should be
tightened. Of course, these changes would only apply to private property to
retain people’s right to protest on public land.

Which of the following statements from this text is the Claim?

Check one
option.

  • “There are numerous examples of people struggling to remove squatters due to
    the inadequacy of the law.”
  • There is none.
  • “These cases clearly demonstrate that laws against squatting on private
    property should be tightened.”
  • “… these changes would only apply to private property to retain people’s right
    to protest on public land.”

Q6. Consider the following argument.

There are
numerous examples of people struggling to remove squatters due to the
inadequacy of the law. For example, Imran Lakhani, despite finding squatters on
his property while working overseas, struggled for 6 months to remove the
squatters in his house. Dale Morrison faced similar issues too when she and her
family returned from holiday to find squatters in their house. These cases
clearly demonstrate that laws against squatting on private property should be
tightened. Of course, these changes would only apply to private property to
retain people’s right to protest on public land.

Which of the following statements from this text is the Warrant?

Check one
option.

  • “… these changes would only apply to private property to retain people’s right
    to protest on public land.”
  • There is none.
  • These
    cases clearly demonstrate that laws against squatting on private property
    should be tightened.”
  • “There are numerous examples of people struggling to remove squatters due to
    the inadequacy of the law.”

Q7. Consider the following fictional newspaper article.

Homeless man
Mike Davis pulled himself back on his feet with some hard work in his new
microbusiness, cleaning local restaurants and bars. While his microbusiness
might have given him a newfound sense of dignity, along with a few dollars,
Mike confessed to his case manager Susan Lee at New Choices Welfare that he
still had a unfulfilled dream – to find his long-lost sister in the city of
Bramingham. That’s when Susan, in conjunction with Flyaway Travel, worked to
make Mike’s dream a reality …

A cultural studies theorist critiques the article in the following way.

Another
example of the responsibilisation of homelessness can be seen in an article in
the Southern Messenger (Diaz, 2011). A narrative of individual self-help,
supported by the newspaper’s advertisers, is told, ignoring the broader systemic nature of homelessness.

Which feature of critique, outlined in lesson 5.3a, can be found in the
theorist’s writing?

  • A structural worldview is needed, where individual issues are socio-political
    phenomena.
  • The university is an agent of change rather than just a place to transmit
    thought.
  • Theory is never neutral, but either maintains or challenges unequal power
    structures.
  • Unjust ideologies maintain unequal power structures.

Q8. Consider the following fictional newspaper article.

Homeless man
Mike Davis pulled himself back on his feet with some hard work in his new
microbusiness, cleaning local restaurants and bars. While his microbusiness
might have given him a newfound sense of dignity, along with a few dollars,
Mike confessed to his case manager Susan Lee at New Choices Welfare that he
still had a unfulfilled dream – to find his long-lost sister in the city of
Bramingham. That’s when Susan, in conjunction with Flyaway Travel, worked to
make Mike’s dream a reality …

A cultural studies theorist continues critiquing the article in the
following way.

Narratives
of individual responsibility, such as the Southern Messenger article, serve to
redirect blame towards the homeless for their fate. This ideology then
reinforces how the broader housing system, that prioritizes the exchange-value
of houses on the market rather than their use-value as accommodation, creates a
homeless underclass.

Which feature of critique, outlined in lesson 5.3a, can be found in the
theorist’s writing?

  • The university is an agent of change rather than just a place to transmit
    thought.
  • A structural worldview is needed, where individual issues are socio-political
    phenomena.
  • Unjust ideologies maintain unequal power structures.
  • Theory is never neutral, but either maintains or challenges unequal power
    structures.

Quiz 6: Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 5

Q1. Remember you need to record your participation to pass this assessment item.

Did you contribute at least two posts to the discussion board for this module?

Be honest. . . 🙂

  • Yes, I did.
  • No, I didn’t.
Conclusion:

I hope this Critical Thinking Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers would be useful for you to learn something new from the Course. If it helped you, don’t forget to bookmark our site for more Quiz Answers.

This course is intended for audiences of all experiences who are interested in learning about new skills in a business context; there are no prerequisite courses.

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