Copyright Law in the Music Business Coursera Quiz Answers

Get Copyright Law in the Music Business Coursera Quiz Answers

In this course taught by E. Michael Harrington, students will learn the basis for copyright including what is and is not covered by copyright law. This course will help clarify what rights artists have as creators as well as what the public is free to take from their work.

Students will also learn what to do if someone copies their work and what to do if they are accused of copying someone else. Finally, the course will discuss how technology has changed copyright for the better (and worse) and how copyright laws may change in the coming years.

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Copyright Law in the Music Business Week 01 Quiz Answers

Quiz : Copyright and Intellectual Property

Q1. When is a copyright established?

  • From the moment an original piece of work is created in a tangible medium.
  • When a piece of work is registered with your country’s copyright office.
  • When you have an idea for an original work.

Q2. What constitutes a “tangible medium?” Check all that apply.

  • A Lead Sheet
  • A Live Performance
  • Sheet Music
  • A Lyric Sheet
  • Sound Recording of Any Kind

Q3. If you write a song that you edit a number of times throughout the writing process, what version of that song is protected under the copyright law?

  • The original version
  • The final version
  • All of the above

Q4. How long does a copyright last in the United States?

  • Forever
  • The life of the author
  • The life of the author plus 70 years after the author’s death
  • 70 years

Q5. True or False: Copyright covers an idea.

  • True
  • False

Q6. In the United States, what type of law is copyright law?

  • State Law
  • Municipal Law
  • Federal Law

Q7. What does “exclusive right” mean? Check all that apply.

  • You have the right to exclude other people from using your copyright.
  • Someone has the right to exclude you from using their copyright.
  • You have the right to exclusively use someone else’s copyright.
  • Someone has the right to exclusively use your copyright.

Q8. What is the first exclusive right in the United States copyright law?

  • You have the right to copy anyone else’s work freely, as long as you ask permission.
  • No one else has the right to copy your work.
  • Anyone has the right to copy your work, as long as they ask permission.
  • Anyone has the right to copy your work freely.

Q9. True or False: An artist can create a derivative work without first obtaining a license. It is viewed as a compliment in the industry.

  • True
  • False

Q10. True or False: Anyone can perform your song publicly without asking your permission as the owner of the copyright.

  • True
  • False

Quiz : Case Study: Sarah and Taylor Swift

Q1. Assuming Sarah has not infringed the melody of Taylor Swift’s “that’s what people say,” would Sarah infringe Taylor Swift’s copyright by writing a song called, “That’s What People Say?”

  • Yes
  • No

Q2. Assuming Sarah has not infringed the melody of Taylor Swift’s “this sick beat,” do any of Sarah’s new phrases infringe Taylor Swift’s “this sick beat?”

  • Yes
  • No

Q3. How does the fact that, in addition to copyright, Taylor Swift owns trademarks in the phrase, “this sick beat,” impact Sarah’s use of Taylor Swift’s “this sick beat” as part of an original lyric by Sarah?

  • Sarah has infringed a copyright but NOT a trademark.
  • Sarah has not infringed a trademark or a copyright.
  • Sarah has infringed a trademark and a copyright.
  • Sarah has infringed a trademark but NOT a copyright.

Q4. Write a short paragraph discussing how Sarah could infringe Swift’s copyright for “Shake It Off.”

Q5. Would Sarah’s t-shirts with the words “This Sick Beat” infringe Swift’s copyright and/or trademark?

  • Sarah has infringed a trademark and a copyright.
  • Sarah has infringed a trademark but NOT a copyright.
  • Sarah has not infringed a trademark or a copyright.
  • Sarah has infringed a copyright but NOT a trademark.

Copyright Law in the Music Business Week 02 Quiz Answers

Quiz : Copyright In Practice

Q1. When establishing a co-writing relationship, when should copyright ownership be discussed?

  • After the song is written.
  • Before any work is produced
  • Some time during the writing process

Q2. Is there a limit to how many writers can work on one song?

  • Yes
  • No

Q3. What does a Performance Rights Organization (PRO) do? Select all that apply.

  • Monitor how many times a song is played on the radio
  • Issue royalty payments to artists and writers
  • Issues copyrights

Q4. What are the three most established PROs?

  • AMSCAP, BMI, and SASEC
  • ASCAP, BMI, and SESAC
  • ASCAP, PNI, and SESEC
  • ASHEP, BMY, and SESAC

Q5. What does “fair use” mean?

  • Licensing a work to create a new version
  • Creating a derivative work, such as setting an existing poem to music
  • The use of a copyrighted work without permission of the copyright owner
  • The use of a work from the public domain.

Q6. Would the following scenario be an example of fair use?

An elementary school science class was learning about snakes. They wanted to convey the message that snakes are a very important part of our ecosystem and should be protected instead of feared. They decided to re-write the lyrics to Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way” incorporating their message about snakes and create a music video. The elementary students rewrote the lyrics themselves and played all of the parts of the song on their own instruments. The elementary school did not make any profit off of the project. You can watch the music video here.

  • Yes
  • No

Q7. Which of the following are examples of fair use? Select all that apply.

  • A music teacher arranging a current pop song for her high school choir to sing at their next concert
  • An artist including a cover of a song they did not write on their most recent album as an homage to another artist that inspired them
  • An artist using part of the sound recording from a previously recorded song in their new song

Q8. What does “independent creation” mean?

  • Two separate artists can create songs that sound extremely similar without either artist ever hearing the other’s song. Even though both songs are similar, they maintain separate copyrights.
  • One artist can hear a song, be inspired by that song, and then write their own extremely similar version, independently. Even though the new song sounds similar to the original song and even has the same melody and similar lyrics, the new song is not infringing on the previous song.
  • Two co-writers independently write their own versions of the same song, come together to collaborate, and fuse their songs together to make one, new song.

Q9. What is the Public Domain?

  • A database where anyone can look up past copyright cases and how they were resolved
  • Where songs go after their copyright expires.
  • A large online library of every song ever written where you can listen to music for free

Q10. Which of the following songs would be in the public domain? Select all that apply.

  • “I’ll Fly Away” (Albert E. Brumley, 1929)
  • “Mass in B Minor” (Johann Sebastian Bach, 1749)
  • “Come Together” (Lennon-McCartney, 1969)
  • “We Shall Overcome” (Charles Albert Tindley, 1900)

Quiz : Case Study: Kirsten Arian v. Carrie Underwood

Q1. What is Arian’s main argument that Underwood did in fact infringe on her song?

  • The melody line in the chorus
  • The key of the song
  • The general theme of overcoming obstacles
  • The use of the lyrics “invincible, unbreakable, unstoppable, unshakeable”

Q2. Complete a brief, but thorough musical analysis of each song and compare the similarities and differences. You may use outside resources to complete your analysis, especially to find the key, tempo, chords, and melody. Be sure to include the following in your analysis:

  • Key/Tonal Center
  • Tempo
  • Chords
  • Lyrics
  • Melody

Q3. After reading through the case and listening to Underwood’s “The Champion” and Arian’s “Invincible,” cite the strongest points of similarity between the two songs.

Q4. Are any of the points you cited in the previous question copyrightable?

  • Yes
  • No

Q5. Based on your knowledge of copyright law and the musical analysis you completed for both songs, compose an argument either supporting or opposing Arian’s claim that Carrie Underwood did in fact infringe on her copyright. Be sure to include why you think the way you do and how you came to that conclusion.

Q6. Did Carrie Underwood infringe on Kirsten Arian’s copyright?

  • Yes
  • No

Copyright Law in the Music Business Week 03 Quiz Answers

Quiz : Sound Recording and Sampling

Q1. Every recorded song technically has two copyrights: a…

  • Composition Copyright and a Sound Recording Copyright
  • Composition Copyright and a Sampling Copyright
  • Lyrical Copyright and a Sound Recording Copyright

Q2. Which of the following elements are protected under the compositional copyright? Select all that apply.

  • Lyrics
  • Melody
  • Chords
  • Vocal Performance
  • Bass Line

Q3. Which of the following elements are protected under the sound recording copyright? Select all that apply.

  • Bass Line
  • Melody
  • Chords
  • Lyrics
  • Vocal Performance

Q4. Read through the following scenario and answer the following question:

  • Artist A composes and records a song.
  • Artist B licenses Artist A’s song and produces a new sound recording.

Who gets paid, and for what copyright, when Artist B’s song gets played on satellite/internet radio?

  • Artist B (Composition Copyright and Sound Recording Copyright)
  • Artist A (Composition Copyright and Sound Recording Copyright)
  • Artist A (Composition Copyright and Sound Recording Copyright) and Artist B (Composition Copyright and Sound Recording Copyright)
  • Artist A (Composition Copyright) and Artist B (Sound Recording Copyright)

Q5. Read through the following scenario and answer the following question:

  • Artist A composes and records a song.
  • Artist B licenses Artist A’s song and produces a new sound recording.
  • Artist C creates a new version of the song and samples Artist A’s and Artist B’s sound recording.

Who gets paid, and for what copyright, when Artist C’s song gets played on satellite/internet radio?

  • Artist B (Sound Recording Copyright), and Artist C (Sound Recording Copyright)
  • Artist A (Composition Copyright) and Artist C (Sound Recording Copyright)
  • Artist A (Composition Copyright), Artist B (Composition Copyright), and Artist C (Sound Recording Copyright)
  • Artist A (Composition Copyright and Sound Recording Copyright), Artist B (Sound Recording Copyright), and Artist C (Sound Recording Copyright)

Q6. Read through the following scenario and answer the following question:

  • Artist A composes and records a song.
  • Artist B licenses Artist A’s song and produces a new sound recording.
  • Artist C creates a new version of the song and samples Artist A’s and Artist B’s sound recording.
  • Artist D licenses Artist A’s song and creates a new sound recording of Artist A’s song.

Who gets paid, and for what copyright, when Artist D’s song gets played on satellite/internet radio?

  • Artist A (Composition Copyright and Sound Recording Copyright) and Artist D (Sound Recording Copyright)
  • Artist A (Composition Copyright), Artist C (Sound Recording Copyright) and Artist D (Sound Recording Copyright)
  • Artist A (Composition Copyright) and Artist D (Sound Recording Copyright)
  • Artist A (Composition Copyright), Artist B (Sound Recording Copyright), Artist C (Sound Recording Copyright), and Artist D (Sound Recording Copyright)

Q7. Which of the following is the definition of sampling?

  • Re-performing a part of a previously recorded song, such as a melodic line, beat, or groove, in a new sound recording
  • Using part of a previously recorded sound recording, such as a melodic line, beat, or groove, in a new sound recording.

Q8. Which of the following is the definition of interpolation?

  • Re-performing a part of a previously recorded song, such as a melodic line, beat, or groove, in a new sound recording
  • Using part of a previously recorded sound recording, such as a melodic line, beat, or groove, in a new sound recording.

Q9. True or False: Replay and Interpolation mean the same thing

  • False
  • True

Q10. True or False: Sampling requires a license, however replay/interpolation does not.

  • True
  • False

Quiz : Case Study: The Sugarhill Gang v. Busta Rhymes

Q1. What is Sugarhill’s main argument that Busta Rhymes infringed on “8th Wonder”?

  • Interpolation of a melodic line
  • Sampling of lyrics
  • Interpolation of lyrics
  • Sampling of a melodic line

Q2. Complete a brief, but thorough musical analysis of each song and compare the similarities and differences. You may use outside resources to complete your analysis, especially to find the key, tempo, chords, and melody. Be sure to include the following in your analysis:

  • Style/Genre
  • Subject Matter
  • Key/Tonal Center
  • Form
  • Chords
  • Lyrics

Q3. After reading through the case and listening to Busta Rhymes’s “Woo Hah!! Got You All In Check” and Sugarhill Gang’s “8th Wonder,” cite the strongest points of similarity between the two songs.

Q4. Would any of the points you cited in the previous question fall under copyright infringement?

  • Yes
  • No

Q5. Based on your knowledge of copyright law and the musical analysis you completed for both songs, compose an argument either supporting or opposing Sugarhill’s claim that Busta Rhymes did in fact infringe on their copyright. Be sure to include why you think the way you do and how you came to that conclusion.

Q6. Did Busta Rhymes infringe on Sugarhill’s copyright?

  • Yes
  • No

Copyright Law in the Music Business Week 04 Quiz Answers

Quiz : Copyright Litigation

Q1. True or False: According to the United States Copyright Law, if Artist A infringes on Artist B’s copyright, Artist B is required to sue Artist A for infringement.

  • True
  • False

Q2. In the United States, how many levels of federal court are there?

  • 1
  • 4
  • 2
  • 3

Q3. In the United States, the first level of court is divided into ___________.

  • Areas
  • Districts
  • Territories
  • Precincts

Q4. What is an appeal?

  • An application for a higher court to hear the losing side’s case from the lower court
  • The application to bypass the circuit court and bring their case directly to the Supreme Court
  • The request for a new trial in the same district court but with a different jury.
  • The request for a new trial in the same district court but with a different judge.

Q5. In the United States, court of appeals is divided into:

  • Neighborhoods
  • Boroughs
  • Circuits
  • States

Q6. True or False: When bringing a copyright case to trial, there are specific circuit courts that may provide a more favorable outcome depending on whether you’re the plaintiff or defendant.

  • True
  • False

Q7. How do you choose a good lawyer? Select all that apply.

  • Go by word-of-mouth
  • Ask a trusted family member who is a lawyer or knows a lawyer
  • Research whether that lawyer has authored articles on the case subject and appear to be an authority in the field
  • Read the lawyer’s website closely for their educational background and areas of legal expertise

Q8. True or False: Most instances of copyright infringement are never brought to court.

  • True
  • False

Q9. What are the levels of federal court in the United States?

  • District, Circuit, Federal
  • District, State, Supreme
  • Local, Circuit, Supreme
  • District, Circuit, Supreme

Q10. What three cities in the United States handle the majority of copyright cases?

  • New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago
  • Washington DC, Los Angeles, and Nashville
  • New York, Washington DC, and Nashville
  • New York, Los Angeles, and Nashville

Quiz : Case Study: Williams and Thicke v. Gaye

Q1. What is Gaye’s main argument that Williams and Thicke did in fact infringe on “Got to Give it Up”?

  • Interpolation of lyrics
  • Sampling of melodic line
  • Interpolation of a melodic line
  • Sampling of lyrics
  • All of the above
  • None of the above

Q2. Complete a brief, but thorough musical analysis of each song and compare the similarities and differences. You may use outside resources to complete your analysis, especially to find the key, tempo, chords, and melody. Be sure to include the following in your anaylsis:

  • Style/Genre
  • Subject Matter
  • Key/ Tonal Center
  • Form
  • Tempo
  • Chords
  • Lyrics

Q3. After watching E. Michael discuss the case and listening to Gaye’s “Got to Give it Up” and Williams’s and Thicke’s “Blurred Lines,” cite the strongest points of similarity between the two songs.

Q4. Are any of the points you cited in the previous question copyrightable

  • Yes
  • No

Q5. Based on your knowledge of copyright law and the musical analysis you completed for both songs, compose an argument either supporting or opposing Gaye’s claim that Williams and Thicke did in fact infringe on his copyright. Be sure to include why you think the way you do and how you came to that conclusion. Once you have composed your argument, share your thoughts on whether you feel the appeal is justified. If so, why? If not, why not?

Q6. Did Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke infringe on Marvin Gaye’s copyright?

  • Yes
  • No
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