Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict Quiz Answers

All Weeks Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict Quiz Answers

Modern organizations are characterized by increasingly higher levels of uncertainty, complexity, and diversity. In our current globalized work environment, how can you manage the power and politics that persistently influence organizational decision-making? Being savvy about organizational politics and having the nous to negotiate and resolve conflict is a critical capability for managers at all levels.

This course will develop your negotiation and conflict resolution skills – crucial to becoming a positive influence in your organization. Via structured learning activities (video lectures, quizzes, discussion prompts, and written assessments) you will conceptualize and measure power and politics; analyze and develop strategies for influencing stakeholders, and learn how to act with integrity and purpose when ‘playing politics’.

Enroll on Coursera

Table of Contents

Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict Coursera Quiz Answers

Week 1: Check your understanding

Q1. According to Thompson (1998), The mind and heart of a negotiator, circumstances in which we’re called on to negotiate arise out of:

Select only one response.

  • Necessity or conflict
  • Opportunity or conflict
  • Confusion or good-will
  • Necessity or opportunity

Q2. Negotiations of opportunity:

Select only one response.

  • Arise when a good business deal is on the table
  • Only occur if one person has more perceived power than another
  • Arise as a result of changing circumstances or temporary openings
  • Are completely involuntary

Q3. A ‘win-win’ refers to a situation when:

Select only one response.

  • People are reasonable, willing to see the other side’s needs as legitimate, and when they take a collaborative approach to reach outcomes that are acceptable to all the parties
  • People make a two-way bet and win both legs
  • People are reasonable up to a point but become unreasonable when they realise they aren’t going to make a clear gain from a deal
  • People are reasonable and agree to whatever the other person would like them to do even to their detriment

Q4. In Fisher, Ury & Patton (1991), Getting to yes, uncovering interests is explained as key in this negotiation style because:

Select all that apply.

  • Focusing on interests over positions is disarming
  • This knowledge can help break deadlocks caused by positions
  • Negotiators then need not defend positions but rather explain what they want and need
  • Counterparts then work together to find options that work for them both

Q5. What is a memorandum of understanding (MOU)?

Select only one response.

  • A document that outlines an organisation’s ‘vision’ for the future
  • A step-by-step negotiation guide for IT companies
  • An informal understanding between two organisation’s about how to move forward in the future
  • A summary of what has been agreed that captures the spirit of the agreement and that signals the parties’ intentions to move forward

Q6. What is one of the legal challenges facing organisations doing international business?

Select only one response.

  • Creating enforceable contracts”
  • Getting confused by the different weather patterns that exist around the world
  • Scheduling meetings because of time zone differences
  • Finding appropriate adaptors to charge your electronic devices

Week 2: Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict

Quiz 1: Check your understanding

Q1. Constructive conflict:

Select only one response.

  • is resolved using cooperative processes, and stimulates innovation and creativity
  • is when two people clash and from the resulting fallout a new invention is created
  • is when two builders argue over how to construct a house
  • is when a negotiation lecturer ‘constructs’ conflict in order to teach their students valuable lessons

Q2. Conflict resolution processes:

Select only one response.

  • are often pointless exercises carried out by the HR department.
  • take a holistic approach to supporting parties, adhering to and maintaining “the peace” well after the intervention and agreement.
  • refer to situations where conflict resolution has been achieved organically via a series of ad-hoc measures.
  • can only be carried out by a professional conflict resolution expert.

Q3. Task conflict:

Select only one response.

  • may arise from issues around personality, approaches to work, managing style, or conflict styles.
  • centres around how work gets done, priorities, resource allocation, procedures and policies, expectations, and other issues.
  • revolves around one’s ability to effectively problem solve.
  • arises when you have incompatibility between individuals or an individual and an organisation.

Q4. Values conflict:

Select only one response.

  • arises from issues around personality, approaches to work, managing style, or conflict styles.
  • centres around how work gets done, priorities, resource allocation, procedures and policies, expectations, and other issues.
  • arises when you have incompatibility between individuals or an individual and an organisation.
  • revolves around one’s ability to effectively problem solve.

Q5. Of the options below, which answer best describes identification-based trust?

Select only one response.

  • We trust our counterparts because we know they fear the consequences if they breach our trust
  • We trust our counterparts because we know they have a lot of money
  • We trust our counterparts because we know them, and can predict their behaviour from our long history of working together
  • We trust our counterparts because we identify with them

Q6. If a ‘withdrawal’ from your emotional bank balance takes place what is this a sign of?

Select only one response.

  • Someone has earned your trust and you are prepared to give them capital
  • Someone has made no effect on your trust
  • Someone has breached your trust
  • Someone has earned your trust

Quiz 2: Check your applied learning (Weeks 1-2)

Q1. Which of the following situations describe a negotiation of opportunity?

Select all that apply.

  • James is considering asking for a raise when his yearly contract is renewed.
  • Yanny has a sudden influx of more orders for her small business, and needs to increase her weekly order with her supplier.
  • Helen receives a message on LinkedIn from a recruiter in another country, asking if she is open to relocation.
  • Siwat, a talented chef, is offered a position at a restaurant his friend has opened.

Q2. Scenario: Roald is an accountant at a mid-sized firm. His manager often overlooks him for contracts with certain clients. Roald is not an experienced negotiator, and struggles to speak up and ask to work on a specific contract.

How can Roald best improve his negotiation skills in this context?

Select only one response.

  • Wait for his yearly review to discuss the issue
  • Practice negotiating with peers and coworkers
  • Think creatively to perceive limits
  • Learn to recognise opportunities

Q3. Which of the following makes a ‘win-win’ situation possible?

Select all that apply.

  • Everyone sees each other’s needs as legitimate
  • All parties are reasonable
  • Everyone works firmly within the constraints of the situation
  • A collaborative approach is taken

Q4. Scenario: Snowsports company

Roxy is negotiating a contract with an elite snowboarder, Fatima. They want Fatima to commit to a flat rate of ten snowboarding events a year. Fatima is not as concerned with the number of events, but she wants the flexibility to take enough time off a year to recover, and wants to include this in her contract.

Which best describes the interaction between positions and interests in this scenario?

Select only one response.

  • Both parties are negotiating this term based on their positions
  • Both parties are negotiating this term based on their interests
  • Roxy has a position, Fatima has an interest
  • Fatima has a position, Roxy has an interest

Q5. Scenario: Snowsports company

Roxy is negotiating a contract with an elite snowboarder, Fatima. They want Fatima to commit to a flat rate of ten snowboarding events a year. Fatima is not as concerned with the number of events, but she wants the flexibility to take enough time off a year to recover, and wants to include this in her contract.

How can Roxy and Fatima resolve this conflict?

Select only one response.

  • By raising demands until the more powerful party wins
  • By investigating the situation, and creating new positions
  • By openly sharing perspectives and making their positions clear
  • By openly sharing perspectives and identifying the needs and interests behind each demand

Q6. Which of the following situations demonstrates an issue caused by a tacit agreements?

Select only one response.

  • A large retail store with a high staff turnover has an unspoken rule that staff share the commission earned from high sales to improve each person’s overall average. A new staff member is excluded from team social events because they don’t know or follow this unspoken rule.
  • A people and culture manager places a sign in the company kitchen reminding staff to put all used cups in the dishwasher after several complaints.
  • A medium tech company provides drinks and snacks for their staff in the shared kitchen. The entire staff, including senior managers, wait until the late afternoon to relax and socialise. New hires are guided in this by their team leaders.

A law firm has a strict dress code that is provided in policy documents.

Q7. What are the main issues with ‘handshake’ deals?

Select all that apply.

  • They depend on mutual trust
  • They are interpreted differently depending on culture
  • They can be difficult to enforce
  • They are not legally binding

Q8. What problems can arise from creating deals through writing?

Select all that apply.

  • Trouble and considerations with awkward wording
  • International jurisdictions can make some agreements unenforceable in certain contexts.
  • Some cultures do not value agreements in writing
  • Deals made in writing have more legitimacy in legal disputes

Q9. Which of the following best meets Morton Deutsch’s definition of constructive conflict?

Select only one response.

  • Conflict that is created through treacherous generational or cultural issues
  • Conflict created from hard positions
  • A conflict that generates new innovations and is found through constructive processes
  • Conflict resolution that identifies and values human needs

Q10. Scenario: Anindya and Franz are both software developers working for Google on the same project. They are both working towards the same goal, but are also engaged in an informal, friendly competition where they each try to improve each other’s work to prove their superior skills. Many of their suggested improvements have resulted in innovations and optimisations of their project.

Which of the following perspectives describe Anindya and Franz’s conflict?

Select all that apply.

  • Constructive conflict
  • Relationship-based conflict
  • Destructive conflict
  • Mixed motive perspective

Q11. According to the Moore (1986) typology, how can data transparency help solve a conflict?

Select all that apply.

  • By making all the relevant information open and available
  • Changing the structure of an organisation
  • Increasing trust
  • Removing ambiguity

Q12. Which of the following situations describes standing firm, not positional bargaining?

Select all that apply.

  • A tradesperson offering a quote on a service cannot go below the cost of their materials and staff
  • An employer refuses to offer a long-term employee a pay rise with their contract renewal
  • A finance manager working part time on an MBA needs one day off a week in their contract to complete their degree
  • A client insists all meetings take place with a senior member of staff, as they enjoy the sense of status from dealing with senior employees

Q13. What causes perception mismatches?

Select only one response.

  • Differences in perceptions and understandings
  • Positional bargaining
  • Reflective questions
  • Deterrence-based trust

Q14. Scenario: Soon is a passionate vegetarian, who has recently taken a job in marketing for a hamburger restaurant. He is finding it increasingly difficult to produce marketing ideas for a product that clashes with his personal and core values.

How should Soon approach this conflict?

  • Select only one response.
  • Ask for managerial intervention to navigate the difference between values and output
  • Stop being a vegetarian
  • Focus on managing the values dissonance and understanding the expression of his and the company’s values
  • Reroute the conflict into creative problem solving

Week 3: Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict

Q1. What are some of the negative aspects of conflict avoidance?

Select only one response.

  • Underneath people can build up a lot of frustration and resentment
  • Problems will eventually go away if you avoid them for long enough
  • When a person’s perceived needs or interests are being challenged by others, they assert themselves strongly and this can upset people
  • There are no negative aspects of conflict avoidance

Q2. What is one of the challenges for people with a competitive conflict style?

Select only one response.

  • To have the ability to set an absolute goal because conflict blinds them to what is important
  • To refrain from being domineering and argumentative
  • People with a competitive conflict style face no challenges
  • Problems will eventually go away if you avoid them for long enough so there is no advantage in adopting a competitive conflict style

Q3. Being able to quickly figure out what’s going on in the room, to quickly evaluate proposals, ideas, and options to overcome problems, and being sharp enough to review the proposal or idea quickly and then respond demonstrates what?

Select only one response.

  • Situational awareness
  • Common sense
  • A conflict resolution process
  • Conflict avoidance

Q4. The ability to recognise emotions in others, tuning in to other’s feelings, and recognising their unspoken messages demonstrates what?

Select only one response.

  • Reading the room
  • Conflict avoidance
  • Situational awareness
  • A conflict resolution process

Q5. Amer is reading a menu and he takes a quick glance at the offerings, spots something he likes, orders it, and then doesn’t spend any more time thinking about it.

What ‘type’ of person is Amer?

Select only one response.

  • A satisficer
  • A maximiser
  • A negotiator
  • A moderator

Q6. From the options below what could be considered an ‘absolute goal’?

Select only one response.

  • Talking to your friends and family about your life goals
  • Trusting your instinct and bidding at an auction if it feels right
  • Matching another person bid for bid at an action
  • Setting an upper limit and sticking to it at an auction

Week 4: Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict

Quiz 1: Check your understanding

Q1. An example of a person taking a one-down position could be?

Select only one response.

  • By saying, I may be wrong, you’re probably right
  • Not apologising for being late to a meeting in order to save face
  • Betting on who will win the argument between two colleagues
  • By saying, ‘that’s interesting…’, then pausing

Q2. Diamond (2010) discusses three elements of negotiation.

What are they?

Select only one response.

  • The substance, the context and the one-up move
  • The relationship, the process and the substance
  • The relationship, the person and the context
  • The one-up move, the one-down move and the one-across move

Q3. The success or failure of negotiation is often judged by what?

Select only one response.

  • DASS scores
  • The negotiation coefficient
  • Fairness of the process
  • Financial outcome

Q4. What are some techniques you can use to cut-off dominant individuals?

Select all that apply.

  • Matching the person’s pace so you can retake control – but not matching the intensity in their voice
  • Using a one-across move
  • Using minimal interruptions to create punctuation points
  • Breaking eye contact

Q5. According to Wheeler’s (2013) theory what happens at the bargaining stage?

Select only one response.

  • The agreement is put into practice
  • Areas of agreement are identified and differences explored
  • At this stage, interests are clarified and counter-offers are also often made that will ideally build on initial offers
  • Trades are offered, and concessions are requested, denied or agreed

Q6. What is the re-entry problem in representative negotiations?

Select only one response

  • When you as a negotiator fail to seize an opportunity or an ‘entry point’ in an important negotiation
  • When you as a negotiator re-enter a room late and forfeit your dominant negotiation position
  • When you as a negotiator enter in negotiation process without all of the crucial information
  • When you as a negotiator have formed a sense of empathy for your counterparts and when the people you are representing criticise you for being too soft in a negotiation

Quiz 2: Check your applied learning (Weeks 3-4)

Q1. Scenario: Sarah is a team leader, managing an employee who is consistently late for work. She doesn’t want to confront her employee, so she is avoiding the problem.

Which of the following best describes Sarah’s conflict style, and the most likely consequence?

Select only one response.

  • Sarah’s conflict style is competitive; she needs to use reflective questioning.
  • Sarah’s conflict style is avoidance. She is likely to bottle up frustration
  • Sarah’s conflict style is avoidance; she is probably very popular and well-liked as a result
  • Sarah’s conflict style is competitive; she needs to learn behavioural flexibility

Q2. Which of the following strategies can help you adapt your conflict style?

Select all that apply.

  • Reflective journaling
  • Self-awareness
  • Mentoring
  • Practice

Q3. How can you become a sense-maker?

Select only one response.

  • By asserting using ‘I’ statements
  • Through asking a mix of open and closed questions
  • Through connecting the dots and understanding the whole picture
  • By summarising and reframing what the other party has said

Q4. Which of the following is an effective question in negotiation?

Select only one response.

  • Is this in relation to last year’s profits? Why is it here? How did you report this result previously?
  • So, you’re saying that you aren’t happy with the cost agreement?
  • Shouldn’t you add another clause to the agreement?
  • You didn’t think I would notice that detail, did you?

Q5. Scenario: You are a marketing manager who frequently contracts out to the same graphic designer, Aarav. You have heard from a friend who works at Aarav’s firm that the designer is already concerned they will not be given enough time to complete the work. You are on a strict budget, and unable to offer the designer more time.

Which of the following are effective statements to start the negotiation with to ensure Aarav does not dismiss the project?

Select only one response.

  • “I want you to complete this project within a strict time frame.”
  • “So Aarav, I know that you are concerned with the time crunch on this project, so we have simplified some of the tasks to allow you more time. Here are the details…”
  • “Please consider this project, even though I can’t give you enough time. It isn’t my fault, and I promise I will give you enough time next time”.
  • “You’re worried about time constraints, aren’t you?”

Q6. Based on Schwartz’s research on the paradox of choice, which of the following statements are true about the maximiser and satisficer tendencies?

Select all that apply.

  • You should aim to be a maximiser during the negotiation, and a satisficer afterwards
  • Maximisers are worse negotiators, and are less likely to be satisfied with the result
  • Maximisters are better negotiators, but less satisfied with the result
  • Satisficers may not negotiate as hard as maximisers, but they are more content with the results

Q7. Which of the following are absolute goals?

Select all that apply.

  • Jane won’t accept a salary that is below $100,000.
  • Akio is a builder, who wants to win the tender for a new library. He is unwilling to offer below a certain price.
  • Portia will only consider taking a promotion if she is paid more than her less-experienced counterpart.
  • Sofia refuses to use a particular supplier unless they charge her the same as her competitor.

Q8. Which statement is a ‘one-across’ move?

Select only one response.

  • “That is a useful insight.”
  • “I only care about content, not the process, I can’t see why you are worried about that.”
  • “I’ll let you handle that, as you know more than me.”
  • “You are wrong regarding the proper procedure.”

Q9. Which behaviours are non-verbal ‘one-up’ moves?

Select all that apply.

  • Taking a phone call during a meeting
  • Being late without apologising
  • Pausing at the end of a statement
  • Shaking the other negotiators hand weakly

Q10. Scenario: Wikus is leading his first negotiation with a data centre. They are in conflict over the price of services.

How might Wikus regain his footing in this negotiation?

Select only one response.

  • Through using a ‘silence or violence’ approach
  • By neutrally stating the nature of the dispute, and suggesting they investigate some other issues and revisit the contentious issue of price a little later
  • Through setting the rules of engagement
  • By using assertive ‘you’ statements

Q11. Which of the following are recommended steps to track content and process, according to Patterson et al. (2011). Crucial conversations: Tools for talking when the stakes are high?

  • Recognise your own unhelpful behaviours
  • Look for safety problems
  • Setting the agenda
  • Taking a ‘one-down’ position

Q12. What best describes the ‘mediation diamond’ structure?

Select only one response.

  • A process which begins narrowly and ends broadly
  • A structure that begins with a narrow and specific opening, widening to broader issues, and narrowing again to a resolution
  • A linear process that is followed in all successful negotiations
  • A divergent-convergent structure that closes with understanding and exploration

Q13. Scenario: A teacher’s union decided to strike for better pay, leaving the education department scrambling to find staff to look after schoolchildren. Nagita is an expert negotiator who was sent by the department to resolve the issue. However, after speaking with the teachers, she softened her approach and agreed to some of their demands.

What problem might Nagita now face as she reports back to the Department, and how can she resolve this?

  • Nagita has encountered the appeaser problem. She needs to toughen up!
  • Nagita has encountered the appeaser problem. She needs to use the mediation diamond to structure her negotiation.
  • Nagita has encountered the re-entry problem. She should assertively return to the negotiations with her department’s demands.
  • Nagita has encountered the re-entry problem. She should map her stakeholders, and identify individuals within the department who can help make her softened agreement more popular.

Week 5: Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict

Quiz 1: Check your understanding

Q1. What are the common problems that could challenge an inter-cultural negotiator?

Select all that apply.

  • Unwillingness to change or adapt
  • Differing time zones
  • Loss of face
  • Misinterpreting behaviour

Q2. According to Schein (1992) what are the three (3) levels of corporate culture?

Select only one response.

  • Artefacts visible, underlying assumptions and language
  • Artefacts visible, values, and underlying assumptions
  • Values, artefacts visible and revenue
  • Underlying assumptions, religion and language

Q3. Lax & Sebenius (2006)’s expectations model highlights four (4) surface and process expectations and they are?

Select only one response.

  • Formality, etiquette, communication styles and emotional expression
  • Formality, language, sustainability compliance and emotional expression
  • Etiquette, communication styles, context and sustainability compliance
  • Etiquette, budget size, language and communication styles

Q4. Of the options below which ones are examples of Meyer’s (2015) key actions to help to reduce miscommunication in cross cultural negotiation situations

Select all that apply.

  • Avoid yes-or-no questions
  • Recognise what emotional expressiveness signifies
  • Talking louder than usual
  • Beware of putting it in writing
  • Figure out how to express disagreement
  • Recording all meetings
  • Learn how the other culture builds trust

Q5. What are some techniques you can use to avoid the ultimate ‘attribution error’?

Select all that apply.

  • A level of interest in other cultures
  • Knowledge of different cultural values
  • Having zero willingness to question cultural stereotypes
  • A willingness to question cultural stereotypes

Q6. According to the instructor, a collectivist negotiator may see a negotiator from an individualistic culture as being:

Select only one response.

  • Tall, lonely and selfish
  • An exemplar for how negotiation should be done properly
  • Confident, assertive and admirable
  • Pushy, insensitive or controlling

Week 6: Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict

Quiz 1: Check your understanding

Q1. Ambiguity and uncertainty surrounding a negotiation make it more difficult to:

Select all that apply.

  • Evaluate your counterpart’s true interests
  • Choose your organisation’s employee of the month
  • Evaluate all of the options relative to everyone’s interests
  • Accurately value trades

Q2. According to Lax & Sebenius (2006) what are the three (3) dimensions in negotiation?

Select only one response.

  • The persuasive skill of the negotiator, the creative options that are developed ‘at the table’ and the actions taken by a negotiator to shape the negotiation operating environment
  • The creative options that are developed by the negotiator, the ease at which another can be tricked by another and the negotiation operating environment
  • The negotiation operating environment, the difference in power dynamics between the two negotiation parties and the skill of the negotiator
  • The skill of the negotiator, the ease at which another can be tricked by a negotiator and the creative options that are developed by a negotiator

Q3. The instructor provides three (3) key recommendations for designing and managing the multiparty process. What are they?

Select only one response.

  • Ensure that the event is well-catered, you have booked an appropriate MC and you livestream the whole event
  • Use a facilitator, clearly determine a deadlock strategy and livestream the meeting via Facebook
  • Use a secretariat, use a facilitator and clearly determine a deadlock method
  • Use a secretariat, ensure the event is well-catered and determine a deadlock strategy

Q4. The instructor provides examples of ways you can determine a deadlock method. What are they?

Select all that apply.

  • Consensus
  • Unanimous
  • Congestion busting infrastructure
  • Voting

Q5. How does the instructor define an intractable conflict?

Select only one response.

  • Conflicts that are minor and unimportant
  • Conflicts that seems impervious to all attempts at resolution
  • Conflicts that can be solved easily by a team of skilled negotiators
  • Conflicts that can not and will not ever be solved

Q6. From the list below what are some examples of conflict transformation?

Select all that apply.

  • Looking at establishing or restoring a sense of justice to people who are disenfranchised
  • Avoiding conflict until the underlying problems sort themselves out
  • Addressing the causes of poverty that lead to crime or civil unrest
  • Looking at access to water or land ownership when conflict occurs among displaced people

Quiz 2: Check your applied learning (Weeks 5-6)

Q1. Scenario:

Hadrian is negotiating with Akasuki, the representative of a Japanese software company. Every time Hadrian has a question or condition, Akasuki goes back to his company for an answer. Hadrian is becoming frustrated with this, and doesn’t understand why Akasuki would be sent as a negotiator if he doesn’t have the authority to make decisions. He suspects Akasuki is deliberately stalling the proceedings.

Which intercultural negotiation problem are Hadrian and Akasuki facing?

Select only one response.

  • The intercultural problem is loss of face. Akasuki is afraid to be embarrassed or humiliated.
  • The intercultural problem is loss of face. Hadrian is embarrassed by how slow the negotiations are.
  • The intercultural problem is impatience. Akasuki has an inflexible attitude.
  • The intercultural problem is impatience. Hadrian comes from an individualist culture and doesn’t understand Akasuki’s more collectivist approach.

Q2. Review: Munro (2009, November 19). The cultural conundrum of losing face. Sydney Morning Herald.

Consider this scenario:

Ebba is a Swedish lawyer who is arranging a new contract with a chinese company that has recently begun to conduct international business. Ebba is sensitive to dynamics in the group she is negotiating with, and knows that they are sensitive to retaining face.

How can Ebba help the deal proceed smoothly?

Select all that apply.

  • Proactively providing justifications and excuses where the company may have made mistakes
  • By being aware that the negotiations are entirely dependent on her intercultural understanding
  • Offer to give credit for the deal to the company
  • Choosing to speak privately when discussing difficult issues

Q3. Which of the following are actions to remove miscommunication, according to Meyer (2009)?

Select all that apply.

  • Learn how the other culture builds trust
  • Ensure that the most senior negotiator begins every meeting with a long, detailed greeting and summary of the previous negotiations
  • Doing what comes naturally
  • Understanding how to express disagreement

Q4. Which of the following is a misunderstanding in a surface and process expectation?

Select all that apply.

  • An Australian businessman warmly greets a Japanese negotiator by saying “g’day mate”. The Japanese businessman is shocked and offended by the lack of formality.
  • A German engineer calmly and straightforwardly declines an offer from an English automobile company without making a counteroffer. The English company is confused by the Germans lack of emotional expression, and assumes the engineer is interested in the role regardless of the offer.
  • An Indian negotiator needs to run every decision by their company, before agreeing to it in negotiation. The American company they are negotiating with become frustrated, and withdraw from the deal.
  • All of the above

Q5. Which of the following describes an attribution error?

Select only one response.

  • Attributing every failure in the negotiation to cultural differences
  • When one party does not understand the level of formality required in the country they are visiting
  • When a negotiator assumes every action is the result of the other negotiators
  • When a collectivist negotiator is unnecessarily stubborn

Q6. Scenario:

Marcel owns the french bakery chain La Petite Baguette. He wants to negotiate the purchase of fair trade chocolate for his chocolate croissants from a Bolivian supplier, represented by Sofia. Coming from a French background, Marcel values punctuality and formality. Sofia’s approach to negotiation is a lot more relaxed.

What steps can Marcel take to avoid the attribution error?

Select all that apply.

  • Examine his own approach and determine where he may adapt to suit the needs of this negotiation
  • Educate himself on Bolivian business culture and communication
  • By ensuring he is communicating in a low context culture
  • By wearing a traditional Bolivian hat to show his knowledge and appreciation of Sofia’s culture

Q7. Scenario:

Marcel owns the french bakery chain La Petite Baguette. He wants to negotiate the purchase of fair trade chocolate for his chocolate croissants from a Bolivian supplier, represented by Sofia. Coming from a French background, Marcel values punctuality and formality. Sofia’s approach to negotiation is a lot more relaxed.

What steps can Sofia take to avoid the attribution error?

Select all that apply.

  • Acknowledging that she finds Marcel an annoying person, and trying to avoid any non-business communication.
  • Dressing more formally
  • Ensuring she is always on time
  • Expressing exasperation with the level of formality in the communication

Q8. Which of the following best describes Watkins’ (1999) criticism of mainstream negotiation models?

Select only one response.

  • That mainstream negotiation models relied on dividing loyalty within a team
  • That they relied on an idealisation of the simplicity of a negotiation, but didn’t factor in emotional complexities
  • That mainstream negotiation models overly focused on party sizes
  • That they avoided addressing sequencing

Q9. Which of the following describes a risk in sequencing?

Select only one response.

  • Sequencing can cause ambiguity, making it difficult to determine your counterpart’s true interests
  • Sequencing may be viewed by some as lobbying
  • Sequencing relies on the creative thinking of the negotiator
  • Sequencing can simplify a complex negotiation

Q10. Scenario:

Steve is a salesman who is in the process of selling a project home to Rushil. Rushil wants to build a large home that takes up his entire block. Unfortunately, part of Rushil’s land has poor drainage, and the local council has not allowed for construction. Steve plans to use his experience in the industry to negotiate with the council so Rushil can build the house he wants.

Which dimension, according to Lax and Sebenius, is Steve exercising in this scenario?

Select only one response

  • Dimension one: The skill of the negotiator
  • Dimension two: Creative options
  • Dimension three: The operating environment
  • Dimension four: The flow of time within the negotiation

Q11. Which of the following correctly describe issues in forming coalitions?

Select all that apply.

  • Coalitions can have misaligned incentives
  • Coalitions can suffer from conflict of interest
  • Coalitions can use power uncaringly
  • Coalitions can be unstable

Q12. Scenario:

Northwood Primary School is having a carnival on Saturday. At 3pm on the Friday afternoon before the carnival, a major storm hits the area, causing flooding on the oval where the carnival was supposed to make place. The Parents and Citizens Association hold an emergency meeting to find a solution. One solution is to use the hall, but the school has many students with special needs who may become overwhelmed by the amplification of sound and dense crowd in a closed room. A lot of these student’s parents are on the committee. Another option is to use the local park, but it lacks the necessary facilities for such a large group. The park needs an answer by 5pm. Finally, they can cancel the carnival, but a lot of time and money has been spent preparing food for the carnival.

Which deadlock method is best suited for this decision?

Select only one response.

  • The parents who agree on the cancellation option sabotage the food prepared for the carnival so the rest of the association are forced to cancel
  • Voting to quickly come to a solution
  • A consensus to show a united Parents and Citizen Association
  • A unanimous decision that allows every option to be thoroughly evaluated, no matter how long

Q13. Inspired by Mitchell’s (2002) exploration of conflict transformation, what practical steps can a modern negotiator use in a seemingly intractable conflict?

Select all that apply.

  • Focus on an immediate and workable resolution
  • Negotiate in a way that deters recurrence
  • Consider the structural causes of conflict
  • Give up and walk away

Q14. Scenario:

The Eastern zone of the country Fictionland has long been in conflict with the West, due to their competing religious and ethnic ideologies. At the conclusion of a civil war, a new president, Irene, has been elected, who has parents from both sides of the conflict.

What can Irene do to help transform this antipathy?

Select only one response.

  • Demand the political powers in each zone outwardly agree to a consensus
  • Formally split the country into two sections
  • Address and reframe the conflict using a neutral term
  • Redirect the tensions by declaring war on a neighbouring country
Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict Course Review:

In our experience, we suggest you enroll in Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict courses and gain some new skills from Professionals completely free and we assure you will be worth it.

Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict course is available on Coursera for free, if you are stuck anywhere between a quiz or a graded assessment quiz, just visit Networking Funda to get Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict Coursera Quiz Answers.

Conclusion:

I hope this Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict Coursera Quiz Answers would be useful for you to learn something new from this Course. If it helped you then don’t forget to bookmark our site for more Quiz Answers.

This course is intended for audiences of all experiences who are interested in learning about new skills in a business context; there are no prerequisite courses.

Keep Learning!

Get All Course Quiz Answers of Influencing: Storytelling, Change Management and Governance Specialization

Leading transformations: Manage change Quiz Answers

Negotiation skills: Negotiate and resolve conflict Quiz Answers

Storytelling and influencing: Communicate with impact Quiz Answers

Risk governance: Manage the risks Coursera Quiz Answers

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

error: Content is protected !!