Ethical Leadership Through Giving Voice to Values Quiz Answers

All Weeks Ethical Leadership Through Giving Voice to Values Quiz Answers

This course offers an action-oriented introduction to Giving Voice to Values (or GVV), an exciting new approach to values-driven leadership development in the workplace, in business education, and in life.

GVV is not about persuading people to be more ethical, but instead, it starts from the premise that most of us already want to act on our values, but that we also want to feel that we have a reasonable chance of doing so effectively. Through positive, real-life examples, pre-scripting, rehearsal, and peer coaching, GVV builds the skill, confidence, and likelihood that we will act on our values more often and more successfully.

Based on research and practice, with over 1,000 pilots in educational settings and companies on all seven continents, GVV helps answer the questions: “What if I were going to act on my values? What would I say and do? How could I be most effective?” This course was developed at the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia and is taught by top-ranked faculty.

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Ethical Leadership Through Giving Voice to Values Week 01 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: GVV Survey

Q1. The Giving Voice To Values approach to values-driven leadership development calls on us to think about values conflicts and ethical challenges in an entirely new way.

The following survey invites you to consider and surface your “starting assumptions” about values and how they play out in your career and your broader life. As we progress through this course, you will be asked to re-visit these assumptions to reflect on how they may be changing, so save a copy of your answers.

If you are a MANAGER or other PRACTITIONER: These questions can provide a useful barometer of the assumptions you (or your organization’s employees) bring to work.

If you are a PROFESSOR or CORPORATE TRAINER: These questions can provide a useful barometer of the assumptions that Learners bring to the educational experience and a helpful way to invite them to re-visit those assumptions as your classes progress.

If you are an INDIVIDUAL LEARNER: These questions can be a useful tool for self-reflection.

Please note you will need to keep a record of your responses in order to review them later in the course. You can download the PDF version below to keep track of your responses as you answer them on the platform.

I have read the instructions and understand that I can download the GVV Survey PDF.

GVV Survey.pdf
PDF File
Open file

  • Yes
  • No

Q2. The hardest workplace values conflicts are in the grey areas; the “black and white” questions are easy.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q3. When it comes to values conflicts in the workplace, the most important thing to learn is how to analyze a difficult situation and figure out what is right.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q4. VALUES: When it comes to values conflicts in the workplace, most folks share the same values.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q5. VALUES: When it comes to values conflicts in the workplace, everyone has a different set of values so it is very difficult to communicate them.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q6. VALUES: When it comes to values conflicts in the
workplace, it doesn’t matter what others think because I know I’m right and I
will stand up for my values.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q7. NORMALIZATION: When it comes to values conflicts in the workplace, they are often unexpected and catch me by surprise.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q8. NORMALIZATION: When it comes to values conflicts in
the workplace, they get in the way of getting my real work done.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q9. NORMALIZATION: When it comes to values conflicts in
the workplace, they are everyday occurrences and they don’t bother me much
because I know how to handle them.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q10. NORMALIZATION: When it comes to values conflicts in
the workplace, I try to rush through them so I can get back to work.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q11. CHOICE: When it comes to values conflicts in the
workplace, I often feel as if I don’t have a choice.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q12. CHOICE: When it comes to values conflicts in the
workplace, I have often voiced my values effectively.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q13. CHOICE: When it comes to values conflicts in the
workplace, I can think of times when I did not voice my values effectively.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q14. CHOICE: When it comes to values conflicts in the
workplace, I would like to voice my values more often and more effectively.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q15. PURPOSE: I basically just come to work and do my job
but I don’t usually think in terms of larger goals or meaning for my work.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q16. PURPOSE: My work is meaningful and makes a
contribution to the world.

  • Strongly
    agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q17. PURPOSE: My role at work is important and I understand
its impact.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q18. PURPOSE: I have taken time to think about what I am working for.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q19. SELF-KNOWLEDGE AND ALIGNMENT: I see myself primarily as an:

  • Introvert
  • Extrovert

Q20. SELF-KNOWLEDGE AND ALIGNMENT: Based on my answer to Question 19, what impact does that have on my ability to voice my values?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q21. SELF-KNOWLEDGE AND ALIGNMENT: I see myself primarily as:

  • A risk-taker
  • Risk-adverse

Q22. SELF-KNOWLEDGE AND ALIGNMENT: Based on my answer to Question 21, what impact does that have on my ability to voice my values?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q23. SELF-KNOWLEDGE AND ALIGNMENT: I like to primarily work:

  • On my own
  • In teams

Q24. SELF-KNOWLEDGE AND ALIGNMENT: Based on my answer to Question 23, what impact does that have on my ability to voice my values?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q25. VOICE: When I have an important or difficult message
to deliver, I pre-script myself.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q26. VOICE: When I have an important or difficult message to deliver, I practice out loud.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q27. VOICE: When I have an important or difficult message to deliver, I invite trusted colleagues to act as peer coaches.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q28. VOICE: I think that one has to deliver values-based
messages firmly and with conviction, and they often require the ability to
engage in heated argument.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q29. VOICE: I think you can voice your values by asking
questions.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q30. REASONS AND RATIONALIZATIONS: When it comes to values
conflicts in the workplace, you never know what kinds of objections you are
going to face.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q31. REASONS AND RATIONALIZATIONS: When it comes to values
conflicts in the workplace, there are a predictable set of arguments you are
likely to encounter.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q32. REASONS AND RATIONALIZATIONS: When it comes to values
conflicts in the workplace, understanding where the other person is coming from
is likely to confuse me and weaken my resolve.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q33. REASONS
AND RATIONALIZATIONS: When it comes to values conflicts in the workplace, there
are no good reasons/justifications for unethical behavior.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q34. REASONS AND RATIONALIZATIONS: When it comes to values
conflicts in the workplace, I understand the costs of voicing my values.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q35. REASONS AND RATIONALIZATIONS: When it comes to values
conflicts in the workplace, I understand the costs of NOT voicing my values.

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Not sure
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree

Q36. Before you
conclude this survey, please respond to a few demographic questions. Your
answers are kept confidential.

  • DEMOGRAPHICS: What is your age?
  • What do you think?
    Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q37. DEMOGRAPHICS: What is your gender?

  • Female
  • Male
  • Other

Q38. DEMOGRAPHICS: Which of the following best describes your occupation?

  • Business
  • Educator
  • Not working
  • Other professional setting (e.g., healthcare, public sector, military, etc.)

Q39. DEMOGRAPHICS: Where do you currently live?

  • Africa
  • Antarctica
  • Asia
  • Oceania (Australia, New Zealand, etc.)
  • Europe
  • USA
  • Canada
  • Mexico
  • Central America
  • South America
  • Middle East
  • West Indies

Quiz 2: Ethical Leadership Through Giving Voice to Values

Q1. How does multi-disciplinary research support the
Giving Voice To Values approach?

  • It suggests that rehearsal is an effective way
    to impact people’s behavior.
  • It provides the steps needed for habit formation.
  • It shows that individuals who differ from the norm in positive ways exhibit positive deviance.
  • It has identifies the brain’s capacity for change,
    or brain plasticity.

Q2. What is the GVV thought experiment?

  • It is a research study that involved interviewing “Rescuers” from World War II.
  • It is an exercise where people recall times when they have or have not acted on their values and consider the reasons.
  • It is a method for triggering people’s creativity, efficacy, and possibility, when confronted with values conflicts.
  • It is a survey of people’s assumptions and presuppositions about what is possible when it comes to ethical challenges.

Q3. What is the impact of time pressure on voicing values in “The Client Who Fell through the Cracks?”

  • Susan does not think she has enough time to find a way to persuade her boss not to deceive their client.
  • Susan thinks she has to go along with her boss’s unethical instructions, just this once.
  • Susan realizes she can use the time pressure as a reason why she cannot carry out her boss’s unethical instructions.
  • Susan’s boss feels pressured to come up with a way to make his client believe that the firm has managed the client’s portfolio successfully.

Q4. Why is it important to pre-script and action plan for the so-called “clear cut” ethical challenges, where the right thing to do is fairly clear?

  • The “clear cut” challenges are the only ones
    where people can make a difference.
  • People often do not know what the ethical thing
    to do is in a particular situation.
  • The “clear cut” ethical issues are the most important ones.
  • People know what they think is right, but do not
    know how to get it done successfully.

Q5. You are experiencing a values conflict at work
where the same arguments are occurring repeatedly. Which approach would have
the most impact in voicing and acting on your values effectively?

  • Developing a moral muscle memory.
  • Reading relevant case studies.
  • Finding the right model of ethical reasoning.
  • Asking for advice from colleagues.

Q6. Why are hyper-norms important?

  • They help us identify the most important values.
  • They help us understand the reasons for cultural relativism.
  • There are very few of them.
  • They help us identify the values that we share with others.

Q7. Why are traditional approaches to applied ethics insufficient?

  • They do not help people practice the skills and develop the confidence to act on their values.
  • They fail to provide definitive “right answers” for values conflicts.
  • They present contradictory models of ethical reasoning.
  • They do not help people to recognize the many ways that ethical conflicts may surface in their lives.

Q8. How does having a broad purpose help you voice
your values more effectively?

  • It allows you to be able to easily go along with
    the decisions of others.
  • It provides you an opportunity to focus on just getting transactions done successfully.
  • It allows you to be able to just get through things.
  • It provides you a source of energy and commitment for influencing others.

Q9. Which of the seven GVV pillars attempts to answer the question, “Am I the kind of person that can do this?”

  • Normalization
  • Purpose
  • Reasons and Rationalizations
  • Self- Knowledge and Alignment

Q10. What is the new question of the GVV approach?

  • What is the right thing to do in my particular situation?
  • Once I know what I believe is right, how can I get it done effectively?
  • Which model of ethical reasoning is the most
    appropriate to use in my situation?
  • What evidence do I need to gather to support my
    ethical viewpoint?

Ethical Leadership Through Giving Voice to Values Week 02 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: A Tale of Two Stories

Q1. In your career — and your life — thus far, you have likely encountered situations when your values conflicted with what you were asked to do. Often it is not easy to align your own personal values and purpose with those of your boss, your co-workers, your direct reports, your customers/clients, or your firm at work (and of course, with others in life more generally). This exercise is designed to help you identify and develop the competencies necessary to achieve that alignment.

Please note you will be revisiting these responses during Week 3, so we recommended that you keep record of your responses. You can download the PDF version here to keep track of your responses as you answer them on the platform.

I have read the instructions and understand that I can download A Tale of Two Stories Exercise PDF.

GVV Exercise- A Tale of Two Stories.pdf
PDF File
Open file

  • Yes
  • No

Q2. Part
I: Recall a time in your work experience when your values conflicted with what
you were expected to do in a particular, non-trivial decision, and you spoke up
and acted to resolve the conflict. [If you are an educator, you can think of a
classroom or academic institution experience; if you are a learner in another
non-work context, you can think of a more general life experience.]

What did you do, and what was the impact?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q3. Part I: Based on your response to Question 2, what motivated you to speak up and act?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q4. Part I: Based on your response to Question 2, how satisfied are you? How would you like to have responded? (This question is not about rejecting or defending past actions but rather imagining your Ideal Scenario.)

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q5. Part I: Based on your answer to Question 2, what things made it easier
for you to speak/act (the “Enablers”)? (both things within your own control and
things within the control of others)

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q6. Part
1: Based on your answer to Question 2, what things made it harder for you to
speak/act (the “Disablers”)? (both things within your control and things within
the control of others)

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q7. Part
II: Recall a time in your work experience when your values conflicted with what
you were expected to do in a particular, non-trivial decision, and you did not speak up or act to resolve the
conflict. [If you are
an educator, you can think of a classroom or academic institution experience;
if you are a learner in another non-work context, you can think of a more
general life experience.]

What did you do, and what was the impact?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q8. Part II: Based on your answer to Question 7, why didn’t you speak up or
act? What would have motivated you to speak up or act?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q9. Part II: Based on your response to Question 7, how satisfied are you? How would you like to have responded? (This question is not about rejecting or defending past actions but rather imagining your Ideal Scenario.)

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q10. Part II: Based on your answer to Question 7, what things would have made
it easier for you to speak/act (the “Enablers”)? (both things within your
control and things within the control of others)

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q11. Part II: Based on your answer to Question 7, what things made it harder for you to
speak/act (the “Disablers”)? (both things within your control and things within
the control of others)

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Quiz 2: GVV Personal-Professional Profile

Q1. The following survey invites you to consider and surface your “Personal-Professional Profile” with regard to your own strengths and preferences for values expression in your career and your broader life. As we progress through this course, you will want to consider how to play to your strengths when voicing and enacting your values.

If you are a MANAGER or other PRACTITIONER: These questions can provide a useful barometer of the strengths and preferences for value expression that you (and your organization’s employees) bring to work, and provide indicators for how to re-frame challenges and play to one’s strengths.

If you are a PROFESSOR or CORPORATE TRAINER: These questions can provide a useful barometer of the strengths and preferences for value expression Learners bring to the classroom and a helpful way to invite them to re-visit and consider how to play to their strengths when voicing and enacting their values.

If you are an INDIVIDUAL LEARNER: These questions can be a useful tool for self-reflection.

Please note you will be revisiting these responses throughout the course, so we recommended that you keep record of your responses. You can download the PDF version below to keep track of your responses as you answer them on the platform.

I have read the instructions and understand that I can download the Personal Professional Profile PDF.

Personal Professional Profile.pdf
PDF File
Open file

  • Yes
  • No

Q2. If you find that your values conflict with those of the company where you work, how likely is it that you will: not mind too much?

  • Very likely
  • Somewhat likely
  • Not likely at all

Q3. If you find that your values conflict with those of the company where you work, how likely is it that you will: experience it as stressful?

  • Very likely
  • Somewhat likely
  • Not likely at all

Q4. If you find that your values conflict with those of the company where you work, how likely is it that you will: quietly handle the stress?

  • Very likely
  • Somewhat likely
  • Not likely at all

Q5. If you find that your values conflict with those of the organization where
you work, how likely is it that you will remove yourself from the situation
(e.g., look for another job, transfer to another work group, etc.)?

  • Very likely
  • Somewhat likely
  • Not likely at all

Q6. If you find that your values conflict with those of the company where you work, how likely is it that you will: speak up about your objections?

  • Very likely
  • Somewhat likely
  • Not likely at all

Q7. If you find that your values conflict with those of the company where you work, how likely is it that you will: advocate alternative values or approaches within the company?

  • Very likely
  • Somewhat likely
  • Not likely at all

Q8. If you find that your values conflict with those of the company where you work, how likely is it that you will: try to get others to join you in addressing your concerns?

  • Very likely
  • Somewhat likely
  • Not likely at all

Q9. Think of a few occasions when you encountered a values conflict in your previous work experience. Recall how you handled the situations. Would you characterize yourself and your behavior as that of:

  • An Idealist (One who is primarily concerned with moral ideals when making decisions on how to act)
  • A Pragmatist (One who is concerned with his/her own material welfare, but also with moral ideals. “Pragmatists will gladly do their fair share to create a civil society, but not place themselves at a systematic disadvantage” to do so)
  • An Opportunist (One who is only concerned with his/her own material welfare)

Q10. If you placed yourself in the category of “pragmatist,” what can you do to maximize the likelihood that you will act on your ideals? What competencies will you need?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q11. Think of someone you deeply respect. What are the 2 or 3 characteristics you most admire in this person?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q12. Who are you at your best?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q13. Name your 3 or 4 deepest values.

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q14. What is the one sentence you would like to see in your obituary that captures who you really were in life?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q15. PURPOSE: What is your personal purpose for your business career?

  • Some possible issues to consider:
  • What impact do you have want to have? On whom?
  • Whom do you want to know you benefited? In what ways?
  • What do you want to learn?
  • How do you define your impact as a/n: auditor, investor, management, product developer, marketer, senior executive, etc.?
  • What do you hope to accomplish? What will make your professional life worthwhile?
  • How do you want to feel about yourself and your work, both while you are doing it and in the end?
What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q16. RISK: Do you see yourself as…

  • Primarily risk-averse
  • Slightly risk-averse
  • Both risk-averse and a risk-taker
  • Slightly a risk-taker
  • Primarily a risk-taker

Q17. RISK: What are the greatest professional risks (e.g., harm to customers, employees, the firm) you face in your work?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q18. RISK: What are the greatest personal risks (e.g., livelihood, deportation, legal punishment) you face in your work?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q19. RISK: What are the greatest societal risks (e.g., impact on environment, profession, industry, nation) you face in your work?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q20. PERSONAL COMMUNICATION STYLE/PREFERENCE: Do you deal well with conflict or are you non-confrontational? Under what circumstances do you behave in each way?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q21. PERSONAL COMMUNICATION STYLE/PREFERENCE: Do you prefer communicating in person or in writing?

  • I prefer communicating in person
  • I prefer communicating in writing

Q22. PERSONAL COMMUNICATION STYLE/PREFERENCE: Do you think best from the gut and in-the-moment or do you need to take time out to reflect and craft your communications?

  • I think best from the gut and in-the-moment
  • I need to take time out to reflect and craft my communications

Q23. PERSONAL COMMUNICATION STYLE/PREFERENCE: Do you assert your position with statements or do you use questions to communicate?

  • I assert my positions with statements
  • I use questions to communicate

Q24. LOYALTY: Do you tend to feel the greatest loyalty to:

  • Family
  • Work colleagues
  • Your firm/employer
  • Other stakeholders, such as customers

Q25. LOYALTY: Based on your answer to Question #24 regarding who you tend to feel the greatest loyalty to, under what conditions and given what stakes?

What do you think?
Your answer cannot be more than 10000 characters.

Q26. SELF-IMAGE: Do you see yourself primarily as shrewd or naive?

  • I see myself as shrewd
  • I see myself as naive

Q27. SELF-IMAGE: Do you see yourself primarily as an idealist or pragmatic?

  • I see myself as an idealist
  • I see myself as pragmatic

Q28. SELF-IMAGE: Do you see yourself primarily as a learner or as a teacher?

  • I see myself as a learner
  • I see myself as a teacher

Quiz 3: Ethical Leadership Through Giving Voice to Values

Q1. Why is the “Tale of Two Stories” a foundational
exercise for GVV?

  • It helps us to recognize our own capacity for values-driven action and to understand ways to foster that capacity.
  • It makes it clear that some of us are ethical and some of us are not.
  • It demonstrates that ethical behavior is entirely up to the individual.
  • It demonstrates that ethical behavior is entirely dependent on the organizational context.

Q2. Why is it useful to think about CHOICE when it comes to voicing and enacting our values?

  • It helps us understand that we often have more choices than we think.
  • Ith elps us identify when we have options and when we don’t.
  • It helps us recognize our choices and that makes is easy to act on our values.
  • Ith elps us critique the actions of others who do not act on their values.

Q3. Why should you recognize that values conflicts and ethical challenges are a “normal” part of your life?

  • To help you accept the unethical behavior of others.
  • To help you notice when value conflicts and ethical challenges present themselves.
  • To help you respond more calmly and to prepare yourself for them.
  • To accept your own unethical behavior.

Q4. How does
having insights into your own personality features make it easier to voice and
act on your values effectively?

  • It allows you to frame ethical challenges in a way that plays to your identified strengths.
  • It allows you to work on changing your personality features so it is easier deal with ethical challenges.
  • It allows you to find a job where your strengths are in alignment with the organizational culture, making it easier to address ethical challenges.
  • It allows you to collaborate with your colleagues better when you do face ethical challenges.

Q5. How was Cecilia able to build a constructive conversation with the senior manager in “The Diversity Consultant?”

  • She listened to his story and asked him open and non-judgmental questions that helped him to recognize his own blind spots.
  • She shared data about the under-representation of women and Minorities at his firm.
  • She pointed out the executive’s own prejudices.
  • She empathized with the executive and reinforced his critique of the firm’s diversity policies.

Q6. Why should you reflect on your own “Starting Assumptions” about voicing and acting on your values?

  • If you assume that it is not possible to act ethically in a particular organization, you can save yourself a lot of time and effort.
  • If you assume that it is easy to act on your values in a particular organization, you will not need to do so much background research and planning
  • If you understand our own “starting assumptions,” you will understand those of your colleagues.
  • If you understand — and even select — what you assume to be true, you can expand your options for effectively acting on your values.

Q7. What action should you take when you feel that
you are the only one that cares about an ethical challenge?

  • You should assume most people don’t worry about these things because they just focus on the job at hand.
  • You should believe that most people assume that they can’t make a difference, so it’s not worth trying to address.
  • You should raise your concerns and invite the responses of others to see if they share your thoughts.
  • You should not not
    raise any concern because if no one cares enough to discuss it, then it’s not
    worth it.

Q8. Which statement best exemplifies the ability to
change your starting assumptions about voicing and acting on your values?

  • Your Starting Assumptions can change and evolve over time and with effort.
  • Your Starting Assumptions can change only if the culture of the organization changes.
  • Your Starting Assumptions cannot change because they are determined by the country or culture where we live and work.
  • Your Starting Assumptions cannot change because our values come from our family.

Q9. Why did the gentleman who worked in Mergers
& Acquisitions “lie instinctively” when he was asked by the CEO of a
company he was acquiring whether they would lose their jobs?

  • He was unprepared for the question and felt conflicted given his fiduciary responsibility.
  • Honestywas not important to him.
  • There was no way he could have predicted that he would be asked this question.
  • He did not care about the CEO of the acquired company.

Q10. What are “Enablers” and “Disablers”?

  • Factors that make it easier or harder for individuals to act effectively on their values.
  • A set of rules or a code of conduct that clarifies what is ethical or unethical in an organization.
  • Factors that are universally true for all individuals and all organizations.
  • Factors that make it possible or impossible for individuals to act ethically.

Ethical Leadership Through Giving Voice to Values Week 03 Quiz Answers

Q1. Why is it useful to seek coaching from more than one person?

  • People will have different viewpoints on what is right.
  • People will have different perspectives about you and your own
    strengths and abilities.
  • You will want to invite someone to coach you who has a deep understanding of the organization and another who has a deep familiarity with you.
  • Coaches can be wrong and you want to get multiple points of view.

Q2. Why is the Voice Pillar important?

  • It helps us understand there are many ways to voice our values.
  • It encourages us to directly confront individuals advocating unethical actions.
  • It shows us that voice is something you must stand up and do alone.
  • It emphasizes that voice is about one-way communication.

Q3. Why is it important to identify the most frequently heard Reasons & Rationalizations for unethical behavior?

  • To decide whether to act on your values.
  • To recognize when others are using them.
  • To develop and rehearse effective ways to re-frame and respond to them.
  • To better understand how others may justify unethical actions.

Q4. How does position level in an organization impact the ability to take values-driven action?

  • It is challenging for employees at all levels so it is important to understand what works best given one’s position.
  • It is easier for senior level managers because they have authority.
  • It is easier for junior level employees because they don’t have as much to lose.
  • It is easier for middle level managers because they have some authority but are less “in the spotlight’ than senior executives .

Q5. If you are “seeing for positive reinforcement”, what are you likely to do?

  • I find the good in every action.
  • I provide positive feedback to my co-workers.
  • I present my criticisms constructively.
  • I look for openings in any situation to keep moving forward on acting on my values.

Q6. What reasoning supported Jeff’s decision to act on his values in “Jeff Salett From the Top (A)”?

  • He wondered if this adjustment was standard operating practice at the firm and why he hadn’t recognized it sooner.
  • He wondered if he could gain a better understanding of the situation once he was in his position longer and had established relationships with his colleagues.
  • He did not consider the adjustments important enough to warrant action, since they were not illegal.
  • If he agreed to the adjustments, he would be setting up the expectation that he would do so again, thereby making it more difficult for him to act ethically in the future.

Q7. How could you effectively respond to the rationalization, “it’s standard operating procedure”?

  • Say, “As long as it’s not illegal, there’s no problem.”
  • Say, “I don’t want to be disrespectful, so, sure, let’s do it.”
  • Keep quiet since you’re the only one who thinks this is unethical.
  • Ask, “Can you tell me more about this? Does everyone always do it this way?”

Q8. What are preemptive rationalizations?

  • Reasons and arguments that stop you from acting unethically.
  • Reasons and arguments that you use to explain why you did something unethical.
  • Reasons and assumptions that stop us from even trying to act on our values.
  • Reasons and arguments that we hear from others when we try to act on our values.

Q9. What
factors influenced Ben’s decision about how to act?

  • He fresh out of college and very new in the organization so perhaps
    he was mistaken.
  • He did not want to antagonize donors since the organization depended
    upon their support.
  • He did not think the Executive Director of the organization was paying
    attention or interested in the issue.
  • He saw his value to the organization as his ability to ask good questions and to be observant.

Q10. What are the frequently heard Reasons & Rationalizations?

  • Standard Operating Procedure; It’s Not Material; Locus of Responsibility; Locus of Loyalty
  • Standard Operating Procedure; Slippery Slope; Veil of Ignorance
  • Materialism; Rights and Responsibilities; Slippery Slope
  • Locus of Responsibility; Loyalty Oaths, It’s not Material

Ethical Leadership Through Giving Voice to Values Week 04 Quiz Answers

Q1. What is the distinctive contribution of the GVV
approach to values-driven leadership?

  • It provides an ethical decision making framework.
  • It provides a set of rules or a code of conduct to help us determine what is right in a situation.
  • It provides a framework and set of strategies
    for action-planning and rehearsing ways to enact our values effectively.
  • It
    provides opportunities to practice thinking through ethical dilemmas where the
    right thing to do is not clear.

Q2. How does GVV address the challenge of ‘time pressure’ that we often face when we confront ethical issues?

  • By rehearsing ethical voice and action in advance, you can be prepared to react efficiently and effectively.
  • It helps you become familiar with the codes of conduct and rules in your organization so you don’t have to spend time researching them.
  • It helps you get in the habit of taking a “time-out” when you encounter values conflicts so you can think more deeply.
  • It helps you manage your emotions so that you can act more quickly.

Q3. How does GVV address ethical challenges across different instructional or training contexts?

  • GVV uses cases to develop scripts and action plans that are tailored to the specific context.
  • GVV provides rules that are universally true for all individuals and organizations.
  • GVV provides guidelines that clarify what is ethical or unethical across all contexts.
  • GVV is only applicable in certain organizational or educational contexts.

Q4. What are you doing when you “play to your strengths” to voice and act on your values effectively?

  • You are acting boldly and with courage.
  • You are identifying the abilities and strengths that we all share and motivating others to use them.
  • You are framing the values conflicts you face in ways that will enable you to use your own
    individual strengths.
  • You are being playful and using humor.

Q5. How is GVV useful for Senior Leaders in
organizations?

  • It helps them identify the most useful conduct rules and values for their organizations.
  • It provides opportunities to script and rehearse how to respond and truly listen to values based concerns.
  • It sends the message to employees that they care about values.
  • It
    demonstrates that they already know how to act and voice their values.

Q6. Why is “forgiveness” an important Lesson of GVV?

  • If you do not forgive those who pressure you to act unethically then you’ll find
    it stressful to work with them.
  • If you do not forgive those around you who do not resist pressures to act
    unethically then you’ll be lonely at work.
  • If you do not forgive yourself when you fail to voice and act on your values then you might give up.
  • If you do not forgive your managers or colleagues when they pressure you to act unethically then they may not be willing to work with you.

Q7. Why should you look for “positive examples” of
when individuals successfully voiced and acted on their values?

  • They are difficult to find so it increases the impact of your argument.
  • They can improve the image of your organization.
  • They make you feel good.
  • They can provide effective strategies for values driven action.

Q8. How is GVV a life-long process?

  • It focuses on continuously learning from your experiences so that you can improve your ability to voice and act on you values.
  • It makes you aware that you will continuously have to address ethical challenges
    throughout life.
  • It helps you identify ethical from unethical behavior in every situation you could
    face.
  • It provides the framework to help you eliminate all values conflicts.

Q9. Why is it important to find allies and mentors
when trying to voice and act on your values?

  • To help you understand your strengths, and provides advice on when and to whom you should raise your concerns in the organization.
  • To provide you with an organizational taxonomy of enablers and disablers.
  • To provide you with their opinion on whether or not a behavior is unethical and needs
    further attention.
  • To help you recognize that you are not alone in addressing the concern.

Q10. If you take
one idea away from this introduction to Giving Voice To Values, what would the
most important insight be?

  • That values differ from one person to another.
  • That voicing your values requires courage.
  • That acting on your values is easier than you think.
  • That you have more choices when it comes to acting on your values than you may think, but that it requires practice to become skillful and effective and confident.
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