Human-Centered Design: an Introduction Coursera Quiz Answers

All Weeks Human-Centered Design: an Introduction Coursera Quiz Answers

In this course, you will learn how to design technologies that bring people joy, rather than frustration. You’ll learn several techniques for rapidly prototyping (such as Wizard of Oz Prototyping) and evaluating multiple interface alternatives — and why rapid prototyping and comparative evaluation are essential to excellent interaction design.

You’ll learn how to conduct fieldwork with people to help you get design ideas. How to make paper prototypes and low-fidelity mock-ups that are interactive — and how to use these designs to get feedback from other stakeholders like your teammates, clients, and users. Armed with these design-thinking strategies, you’ll be able to do more creative human-centered design in any domain.

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Human-Centered Design: an Introduction Week 02 Quiz Answers

Week 2: Learning check-in

Q1. Please tell us how well you have understood the content so far.

  • I am just starting to learn this. I don’t understand this yet.
  • I am beginning to understand this but I still need some help.
  • I can understand this and I can do this on my own.
  • I know this well enough to teach someone else.

Q2. W​which of the following is an example of the need finding strategy in action? Select all that apply

  • Watch people to do their daily tasks to figure out what they value
  • Ask your friends about their experience on the public transportation
  • Tell someone to shoot daily videos to record their changes on eating habits
  • Meet people at some regular interval and have them write down a key piece of info at that time

Q3. Which of the following is true about interviews?

  • It isn’t a good idea to interview people who wouldn’t use your product
  • “What was your freshman experience like?” is a good question to ask
  • “How often do you exercise” is a good question to ask
  • “What would you like in a tool” is a good question to ask

Q4. W​hat is a persona?

  • It is a generalization of a demographic, for example, men ages from 18 to 35
  • A model or an example user that has a full backstory which helps the designer empathize
  • It is only useful during the needfinding stage of the design process
  • It represents the extreme user in your design case

Human-Centered Design: an Introduction Week 03 Quiz Answers

Q1. W​hich of the following are true about storyboards? Select all that apply

  • Storyboards focus on the user interface components and visual design details
  • Storyboards engage in the user interaction details between the user and the app
  • Storyboards address tasks and communicate ideas
  • Storyboards illustrate a goal and unfold the steps to achieve that goal

Q2. What are advantages of paper prototypes over high-fidelity computer-generated pixel prototypes? Select all that apply.

  • Paper prototypes are often cheaper, faster, and easier to create and modify compared to computer generated prototypes.
  • Paper prototypes keep the focus on high-level design while it’s easy to shift focus to details with pixel prototypes.
  • People are more willing to criticize paper prototypes because they look less finished.
  • Paper prototypes separate issues of design from issues of implementation.

Q3. Which of the following are true about Wizard of Oz Prototyping? Select all that apply.

  • It requires a complete product to give the best result
  • It maps out user scenarios and application behavior flows
  • It is worse than paper prototyping because it can’t show the user interface
  • It simulates the interactive behavior and machine functionality

Human-Centered Design: an Introduction Week 04 Quiz Answers

Q1. Interviewing both technophile and technophobe users provides useful insights for design.

  • True
  • False

Q2. Storyboarding allows designers (Select only one answer):

  • to showcase the user interface
  • to focus on the task the user is performing.
  • to discuss details on the final product and marketing plan for that product
  • to create an immersive, detailed world that will feel realistic to all users

Q3. Your friend is trying to understand how a software company decides when software is released, and she interviews one of their engineers. She asks, “At several companies, the CEO is completely in charge of the decision of when to release the software. How do you do it at your company?”

  • What is true of your friend’s interview question? (Check all that apply)
  • This is a great question. It provides the user context about the kind of answer that is expected.
  • This is a leading question: it suggests that the CEO should make the decision
  • This is a great question, since the interviewer establishes she is an expert in the field.
  • This is the wrong question, since it focuses the user on who makes the decision rather than how the decision is reached.

Q4. You need a complete product to employ the Wizard of Oz technique.

  • True
  • False

Q5. When prototyping with a team, what are the benefits of sharing multiple designs with your team members, compared to sharing only one design? (Check all that apply)

  • Sharing multiple designs leads to more individual exploration of the space of possible designs.
  • Sharing multiple designs leads to more sharing of features between designs.
  • Sharing multiple designs provides a vocabulary for talking with the team about the space of possible designs.
  • Sharing multiple designs leads to increased group rapport.

Q6. What are advantages of paper prototypes over computer generated pixel prototypes? (Check all that apply)

  • Paper prototypes keep the focus on high-level design while it’s easy to shift focus to details with pixel-prototypes
  • Paper prototypes usually allow designers to explore a broader range of ideas than pixel-prototypes.
  • Paper prototypes are often less expensive, faster, and easier to create and modify compare to computer generated prototypes
  • Paper prototypes separate issues of design from issues of implementation.

Q7. Imagine you’re designing the world’s first voice-guided navigation system for a car GPS. At this early stage in the design process, you want to find out if drivers can understand and respond to your voice directions while driving a car. Which prototype would you build for this purpose? (Select only one answer)

  • Have pre-determined turn-by-turn directions for a particular route written on a notepad. The experimenter reads out the right directions while the participant drives on the route.
  • Create a video of a person driving on a route, and then add your instructions as voiceover. Show participants this video, and pause the video after each instruction, and ask what participants would do.
  • A paper prototype of the GPS display with multiple “screens” that each shows the map at a different part of a route. The participant evaluates the prototype in a lab. For each screen, the experimenter speaks out the turn directions, and asks the participant what she would do (e.g. “I’d take the next exit”).
  • Create a fully functional system (with a database of routes, directions and voice-clips etc.) on a laptop, and put the laptop in the car. The participant drives the car along the route, and hears the turn directions from the laptop.

Q8. You are a researcher interested in finding out what times of day people are the sleepiest. Which technique would allow you to collect the most data from the greatest number of people with the greatest accuracy? (Select only one answer)

  • Interview
  • Participant observation
  • Experience sampling/pager studies
  • Survey

Q9. What is wrong with the following interview question: “Do you like the Word Art feature of Microsoft Office?” (Check all that apply)

  • The question assumes that the user has feelings about the Word Art feature of Microsoft Office
  • The question is too open ended.
  • The question elicits a binary or yes/no response.
  • The question is leading.

Q10. What heuristic is clearly violated by both these interfaces?(Select only one answer)

  • Aesthetics and minimalist design
  • Recognize, diagnose & recover from errors
  • None
  • Flexibility and efficiency
  • Recognition over recall
  • Help

Q11. You are shopping on Amazon for refill water filters for your refrigerator. You see that there is an option to save money if you “Subscribe and Save”, but you don’t know specifically whether they will charge you on the day that you order, or on the day your subscription order will ship. There is no way to inform you about the specific details of using this feature. Which heuristic does this interface violate? (Select only one answer)

  • Error prevention
  • User control and freedom
  • Help and documentation
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors

Q12. Which heuristic is most clearly violated by the interface in the photo? (Select only one answer)

  • Visibility of system status
  • Flexibility and efficiency of use
  • Match between system and the real world
  • Help and documentation

Q13. Which heuristic is most clearly violated by the interface in the photo? (Select only one answer)

  • Visibility of system status
  • Error prevention
  • Help and documentation
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors

Q14. W​e have created a group for alumni of this Human Centered Design course on LinkedIn and would love to have you be a member of it. This community of designers can provide valuable connections and help answer questions you may have. Joining it is optional.

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