Uncommon Sense Teaching Coursera Quiz Answers

Get All Weeks Uncommon Sense Teaching Coursera Quiz Answers

Do your students spend too much (or too little) time learning, with disappointing results? Do they procrastinate in their study because it’s boring and they’re easily distracted? Are you working to make your teaching even more inclusive? Uncommon Sense Teaching will give you practical new insights that will help you solve these goals and challenges, and many more.

This is like no other course on teaching—it weaves late-breaking insights from neuroscience with personal insights from the classroom to provide unexpected, yet practical, new approaches. You’ll discover how to bring out the best from all your students in today’s diverse teaching environment, where students often have a wide range of abilities.

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Uncommon Sense Teaching Coursera Quiz Answers

Week 1 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: The Fundamentals of Learning and Inclusive Teaching

Q1. The strengthening of connections between links as a student practices is known as ____. (Choose the best answer in accordance with the statements on the videos.)

  • deep learning
  • strength learning
  • temporal learning
  • Hebbian learning

Q2. What is the single most powerful technique shown by research to help students learn most effectively?

  • Retrieval practice (“recall”)
  • Highlight or underline
  • Reread the passages or pages.
  • Create a concept map along the lines of what’s shown here, where key concepts are shown in relationship with other key concepts:
  • graphical user interface, text, application, chat or text message

Q3. Students give up their studies because: (Choose the single best answer in accordance with the information presented in the videos).

  • They don’t have a “growth mindset.”
  • They don’t understand how to learn.
  • They freeze up during tests, as Katina did at the beginning of the first video.
  • They are distracted by technology.

Q4. Learning involves connecting, strengthening, and extending sets of neural links in long-term memory in the ____. (Choose the single best answer in accordance with the information presented in the videos.)

  • occipital lobe
  • diagram
  • hippocampus
  • neocortex
  • cerebellum

Q5. Two of the most important types of memory for classroom learning are _ and long-term memory. (Choose the single best answer in accordance with the information presented in the videos.)

  • imprint memory
  • short-term memory
  • working memory
  • flash memory

Quiz 2: Teaching and Learning Inclusively & Other Week 1 Materials

Q1. The strengthening of connections between links as a student practices is known as ____. (Choose the best answer in accordance with the statements on the videos.)

  • deep learning
  • Hebbian learning
  • strength learning
  • temporal learning

Q2. Why is retrieval practice such a powerful method to enhance learning? (Choose the single best answer in light of the information from the videos.)

  • It helps to strengthen neural connections by using those connections.
  • It allows a student to relax and focus on other activities.
  • The premise of the question is incorrect. Concept mapping is better at enhancing learning than retrieval practice.
  • It “burnishes” concepts by relying on glacosturoids.

Q3. Students give up in their studies because: (Choose the single best answer in accordance with the statements on this week’s videos).

  • They are distracted by technology.
  • They don’t have a “growth mindset.”
  • They don’t understand how to learn.
  • They freeze up during tests, as Katina did at the beginning of the first video.

Q4. Learning involves connecting, strengthening, and extending sets of neural links in long-term memory in the ____. (Choose the best answer in accordance with the discussions in the videos.)

  • hippocampus
  • occipital lobe
  • diagram
  • cerebellum
  • neocortex

Q5. Two of the most important types of memory for classroom learning are _ and long-term memory. (Choose the single best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • short term memory
  • flash memory
  • imprint memory
  • working memory

Q6. Students will often place information in _ and mistakenly believe it has been saved into their _______.

  • long-term memory, short-term memory
  • working memory, long-term memory
  • working memory, distant memory
  • long-term memory, working memory

Q7. The neural links of long-term memory are found in the neocortex—a __-sized, thin sheet of neurons that cover the outer part of your brain.

  • Dime
  • Table cloth
  • Bed sheet
  • Napkin

Q8. Retrieval practice is a form of __ testing. (Select the single best solution in light of the information in this week’s videos.)

  • neocortical
  • low-stakes
  • summative
  • working memory

Q9. As a student practices with what they’ve learned on their own, the neural links become even stronger. This is referred to as the __ stage of learning in this course. (Select the single best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • learn it
  • feel it
  • see it
  • link it

Q10. Different working memory ____ mean different teaching approaches so that each student can be successful. (Choose the single best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • locations
  • types
  • capacities
  • affordances

Q11. Select all true answers from below in light of the information in the videos from this week.

  • Both smaller and larger capacity working memories have their advantages and disadvantages.
  • Students learning new, unfamiliar information benefit from teacher-directed approaches. As students gain fluency, instruction can move
    to more student-directed approaches.
  • “Hiker” students with lower capacity working memory may learn more slowly, but they can learn even better than race-car learners who learn more quickly. To do this, they need more practice with the material.
  • Hiker students with lower capacity working memory are not actually as creative as race car learners. But they can still perform adequately, even if they aren’t as good. The key is in having them understand the material, rather than performing boring practice, which can kill their enjoyment of the material.
  • Having a larger capacity working memory is always a good thing.
  • Scaffolding is at the core of differentiation.
  • Hiker students with lower capacity working memory can be more creative and find more elegant solutions to problems than higher capacity “race car” students.

Q12. ____________ is at the heart of differentiation. (Choose the best answer in light of this week’s videos.

  • Scaffolding
  • Benchmarking
  • Scaling
  • Coaching

Week 2 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Declarative Learning, Consolidation, and Metaphor

Q1. Select the true statements from below:

  • The best way to cement information well into long-term memory, so that the hippocampus isn’t needed as a crutch, is to create concept maps.
  • When students cram, they create lots of superficial indexing links in the hippocampus. Those links are fresh enough to get students through an exam, but afterwards, they quickly fade away.
  • Consolidation is the gradual tightening of sets of
    neural links that underpin an idea so that ultimately the sets of links carry the crystalized essence of the concept.
  • After a late-night session of cramming, information sticks well in
    long-term memory due to the stress of studies.

Q2. With the neocortex being so enormous, how can your working memory ever find any specific piece of information? (Choose the best solution according to the information in the videos.)

  • By using the hippocampus as an index.
  • By using the hippocampus as a temporary storage place that can later “pour” its information into long-term memory.
  • By using the hippocampus to help “etch” the information into long-term memory in the neocortex through a procedure analogous to a wax etching.
  • By using the neocortex to “backfill” into the hippocampus, thus allowing working memory to reach into the hippocampus more easily.

Q3. The _ learning pathway sends information from working memory to both the hippocampus and the neocortex. (Choose the best answer in accordance with the information in this week’s videos.

  • working memory
  • procedural
  • declarative
  • hippocampus

Q4. Encourage retrieval practice because it speeds _____________of links in the neocortex. (Choose the best answer in light of the information in this week’s videos.)

  • Consolidation
  • Removal
  • Growth
  • Neuroblocking

Q5. What do we mean by the phrase “brain break” in this week’s videos?

  • When students take a brief, relaxing mental break from explicit instruction they are receiving, as when they are laughing at a joke or doing a transition from your teaching to a collaborative exercise with their fellow students.
  • When students forget information between study sessions.
  • When the neocortex, hippocampus and working memory overload during learning, so information “breaks” in mind.
  • When students’ working memories become overloaded and they lose track of the key concepts.

Quiz 2: Procedural Learning, Exercise, and Focus & Other Week 2 (& 1) Materials

Q1. What does research show is the best method to “cement” information into long-term memory? (Choose the best answer in light of the videos in this course.)

  • Growth mindset
  • Cramming
  • Concept mapping
  • Retrieval practice

Q2. Consolidation primarily takes place during_______________. (Choose the best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • sleep
  • focus
  • multi-tasking
  • exercise

Q3. Metaphors are thought to be so effective because of insights provided by _____________. (Choose the best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • neural reuse theory
  • the amount of available working memory during learning
  • the theory of relativity
  • left brain-right brain theory

Q4. What are the two fundamental pathways, as described in this course, that the brain uses to deposit sets of links in long-term memory? (Select two):

  • Procedural
  • Inordinate
  • Astral projection
  • Declarative
  • Expletive

Q5. The ______ learning system allows you to do or know things with little conscious thought. (Choose the best answer in accordance with this week’s videos.)

  • procedural
  • declarative
  • metamorphic
  • synaptic

Q6. Scaffolding is at the heart of ________. (Choose the single best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • Retrieval practice
  • Dual tasking
  • Differentiation
  • Multitasking

Q7. Neuroscience is now showing that well-conducted, varied drill as part of the learning process leads to _ and enhances learning. (Check all that apply. Yes, this is a meta-question—we didn’t vary the question, but hopefully you get the idea!)

  • skill
  • skill
  • skill
  • all of the above

Q8. If students learn something but don’t practice what they’ve learned, the new connections they’ve made in long term memory can be swept away by their ___________. (Choose the best answer in accordance with this week’s videos.)

  • hippocampus
  • flugialgestum
  • working memory
  • synaptic janitors

Q9. Spaced _______ builds stronger synaptic connections over time. (Choose the best answer in accordance with this week’s videos.)

  • repetition
  • breathing
  • hippocampal shrinkage
  • hydration

Q10. Exercise produces a fertilizer-like substance in the brain called BDNF that causes ________ (Choose the single best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • dendritic spines to grow.
  • synapses to “weld” together, which allows for easier transport of signals.
  • axons to grow wider.
  • axons to grow longer.

Q11. Select the three forms of multitasking mentioned in this week’s videos.

  • Dual tasking
  • Continuous partial attention
  • Task planning
  • Task switching

Q12. Select the best answer: It is advisable to give students a complete copy of the teacher’s notes prior to the lesson, so students can sit back and listen.

  • True. Being able to passively listen to the teacher during the lesson allows students to retain more information because their working memory is not having to worry about keeping up.
  • False. Passive listening does not generally allow for good learning.

Week 3 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Procrastination, Practice, and Passion

Q1. Which brain mode is operating when you are intently studying? (Select the single best answer in accordance with this week’s videos.)

  • Right brain
  • Focused
  • Diffuse
  • Internal

Q2. Teaching your students about the focused and diffuse modes can help them learn by giving them the following insights (check all that are true in light of this week’s videos).

  • It’s okay if they can’t figure something out right away that they are trying to learn.
  • Taking a little break and getting their mind off the material for a little bit when they reach a point of frustration in their studies is a good idea.
  • Learning takes time.

Q3. Select all that are true in light of this week’s videos regarding the concept of “process over product.”

  • By teaching students effective learning processes, you can help them get past those inevitable rough patches where learning or working on some topic or activity isn’t very enjoyable.
  • If even a world’s leading expert struggles with getting and staying on task, we shouldn’t expect our students to always sit down loving what they do. This is why it’s so important for us to teach our students effective processes for learning and productivity, rather than just telling them what we want them to do or learn.
  • Process over product means you want students to get into the habit of consistently putting in the TIME they need to study effectively—that’s the PROCESS. The PRODUCT—that is, finishing a homework assignment or a project or report, or getting a good grade—follows naturally if good processes are put in place.
  • Process over product means you want students to get into the habit of consistently putting in the TIME they need to study effectively—that’s the PRODUCT. The PROCESS—that is, finishing a homework assignment or a project or report, or getting a good grade—follows naturally if good products are put in place.

Q4. A key challenge in learning (and productivity!) experienced by students and workers around the world—a challenge that is often overlooked—is ____. (Choose the best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • social standing
  • the insular cortex
  • technology
  • procrastination

Q5. Last minute studying means cramming—which means that the bulk of the information being learned is going into the index connections of the hippocampus, instead of into building and strengthening neural connections in ________. (Choose the best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • long-term memory in the neocortex
  • working memory
  • the basil ganglia
  • the cerebellum

Quiz 2: Practice, Passion, and Procrastination & Other Week 3 Materials (with a bit of Week 2 Review!)

Q1. Teaching your students about the focused and diffuse modes can help them learn by giving them the following insights. (Check all that are true in light of this week’s videos).

  • Learning takes time.
  • It’s okay if they can’t figure something out right away that they are trying to learn.
  • If a student can’t figure something out right away, this may simply be a subject they should avoid in the future.
  • Taking a little break and getting their mind off the material for a little bit when they reach a point of frustration in their studies is a good idea.

Q2. Taking a short break after doing the 25 minutes of focus with a Pomodoro gives the hippocampus time to help the neocortex ____ information just learned. (Choose the single best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • forget
  • internalize
  • consolidate
  • substantiate

Q3. The “meathead” theory of learning alludes to the idea that: (Choose the single best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • Both muscle tissue and neural tissue are excitable tissues, which is why it makes sense to compare them.
  • The earliest form of learning was found in a cephalopod affectionately called “meathead.” This type of learning involves an unusual axon-to-axon double switchover.
  • We need protein to develop neural tissues.

Q4. A key challenge in learning (and productivity!) experienced by students and workers around the world—a challenge that is often overlooked—is ____. (Choose the best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • the insular cortex
  • technology
  • social standing
  • procrastination

Q5. Young students who only follow their own passions when it comes to learning can ultimately ___ their future opportunities. (Choose the single best answer for most students in light of the discussion in the videos.)

  • limit
  • increase
  • promote

Q6. On average, little boys and little girls have the same math (analytical) skills.

  • True
  • False

Q7. On average, research has shown that little girls can be more advanced verbally than little boys. (Choose the correct answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • False
  • True

Q8. Select all that are true in light of this week’s videos.

  • Some forms of stress are actually beneficial.
  • Teaching students to reframe certain seemingly stressful situations can help students to do their best in these situations.
  • It’s a good idea to ensure students have plenty of your old practice test to work with.

Q9. Students tend to practice more with what comes________________. (Choose the single best answer in light of the discussions of this week’s videos.)

  • later
  • hardest
  • first
  • easiest

Q10. Both learning to read and learning to write means rearranging the brain’s neural circuitry. The later a child starts in this process, the harder it can become for the brain to rearrange the neural wiring.

  • False
  • True

Q11. Research is showing that most of the actions we take, we take simply because it’s become our _. We can use this to our advantage to help us perform certain actions we might otherwise not wish to do. (Choose the single best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • way
  • style
  • habit
  • opinion

Q12. A rubric is:

  • A scoring guide for an assignment
  • A puzzle cube
  • The breakfast cereal of champions
  • A lesson plan

Week 4 Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Quiz: Insight from Evolution on How Modern Humans Learn

Q1. By the time a child is_______________ old, they have the most neurons and connections in their brains that they’ll ever have. (Select the best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • 4 years
  • 6 months
  • 6 years
  • 2 years

Q2. Select the true answers from the following based on the insights provided in this week’s videos.

  • Developing expertise really can be a simple question of practicing and developing certain parts of the brain
  • Specialists should scan people’s brains and tell them what career they should choose.
  • It can be very important for disciplines to take in ideas from those people originally trained in different disciplines.
  • A discipline should be very wary of accepting ideas or approaches from those trained in other disciplines.

Q3. Educators used to think that drill meant “kill.” But now, with insights from neuroscience, we know that well-done drill leads to “skill.” In other words, “_________. ” This has important implications for all of education, and involves a paradigm shift in how we teach.

  • drill to chill
  • drill to skill
  • drill to thrill
  • skill to thrill

Q4. The ability to recognize faces and learn how to speak a first language—what we might call the “easy stuff,” at least for humans—have been termed ___________.

  • biologically primary cognitive abilities
  • biologically important cognitive abilities
  • primary simplicity cognitive abilities
  • biologically secondary cognitive abilities

Q5. Educators claiming that learning should always be _ can be unaware of the intense and difficult neural rewiring demands of learning tougher, biologically secondary materials. (Select the best answer in light of this week’s videos.)

  • fast
  • fun
  • subliminal
  • difficult

Quiz 2: Final examination

Q1. The hippocampus is where long-term memory is stored.

  • False
  • True

Q2. One of the best ways for students to learn the material you are teaching is to (chose the single best answer in light of the information in this course):

  • Use plenty of jokes and laughter–a happy student is a student who learns.
  • Have students create plenty of concept maps that allow them to see the information from different angles.
  • graphical user interface, text, application, chat or text message
  • To give infrequent, high-stakes tests.
  • Give your students plenty of opportunities to take practice tests, including some of your old tests.

Q3. Select all true statements from below:

  • The PRODUCT—that is, finishing a homework assignment or a project
    or report, or getting a good grade—follows naturally if good processes are put in place.
  • By teaching students effective learning PROCESSES, you can help them get past those inevitable rough patches where learning or working on some topic or activity isn’t very enjoyable.
  • Students should be taught to value PRODUCT (for example, finishing a homework assignment) over PROCESS (for example, doing a certain amount of work daily). This will allow them to keep their focus on the goal.
  • You want students to get into the habit of consistently putting
    in the TIME they need to study effectively—that’s the PROCESS part of the important “Process over Product” approach.

Q4. A “hiker” learner with lesser working memory capacity is always at a disadvantage when it comes to learning—they couldn’t go on to, for example, win the Nobel Prize.

  • False
  • True

Q5. It can be very important for disciplines to take in ideas from those people originally trained in different disciplines, as well as from young people who have not grown used to the usual way of doing and thinking about things. This is because:

  • We need more bad ideas.
  • Looking at a new discipline with a background of training from a different discipline allows fresh perspectives.
  • Young people have not yet had their neural pathways locked in place through many years of looking through the lens of the dogma they’ve originally been trained in.
  • This is actually not true—you should only listen to leaders who are expert in your field.

Q6. What is consolidation? (Select the two best answers in light of the information in this course.)

  • It is a synonym for student-centered learning.
  • It’s the gradual tightening of sets of neural links, compacting them into the crystal essence of the idea.
  • It is a process that occurs largely during sleep.
  • It is a type of mental processing that occurs largely when a person is physically exercising.

Q7. Choose the following correct answers in accordance with the information in this course.

  • Direct instruction takes advantage of both “teacher-directed” and “student-directed” approaches. It has been shown to be one of the best teaching techniques around.
  • Students often need some guidance as they are laying down the initial traces of learning.
  • It is best to give little to no guidance as students are laying down the initial traces of learning.
  • Direct instruction is when the instructor talks directly to the class. Direct instruction is thus to be avoided.

Q8. Select all true answers in light of the information in this course.

  • Anything that gets your heart beating faster than usual counts as “moderate.”
  • Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, although produced by exercise, is one of the few detrimental factors when it comes to learning. This is why it is so important to hydrate during exercise.
  • The United States’ guidelines recommend at least 100 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity five days of the week, for a total of at least 500 minutes a week. Muscle-strengthening activities should also be performed four times a week.
  • The United States’ guidelines recommend at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity five days of the week, for a total of at least 150 minutes a week. Muscle-strengthening activities should also be performed twice a week.
  • Brain-derived neurotrophic factor helps new dendritic spines pop out—this can help with learning.

Q9. Select all true options in light of the information in this course.

  • Dual tasking is when attention is divided among multiple things at once.
  • Task switching is when attention is divided among multiple things at once.
  • Task switching means that you first put your attention on one thing, then shift it to another thing. It’s like having a tightly focused flashlight, and you move the beam from one object to another.
  • Dual tasking means that you first put your attention on one thing, then shift it to another thing. It’s like having a tightly focused flashlight, and you move the beam from one object to another.

Q10. Select all true answers in light of the information provided in this video.

  • Practice with mathematics kills creativity.
  • Bits of daily practice are enormously important in learning, especially with anything that includes a procedural element.
  • Procedural learning isn’t just for physical skills—it’s also for mental skills, especially those that involve pattern recognition, like math or language.
  • Developing expertise really can be a simple question of practicing and developing certain parts of the brain, in much the same way that athletes practice certain muscles to excel at their sport.

Q11. There are three parts to a rubric:

  • A point value or rating scale
  • Creativity
  • The criteria you’ll be assessing
  • An explicit description of the expectation for each criterion
  • Neatness

Q12. Direct instruction can be thought of as teacher-directed learning.

  • False
  • True

Q13. The “I do” stage of teaching is: (Select all true answers in light of the information presented in this course.)

  • Illustrated by this panel:
  • Part of the “learn it” stage in the “learn it, link it” progressive stages of teaching and learning.
  • Part of the “link it” stage in the “learn it, link it” progressive stages of teaching and learning.
  • Illustrated by this panel:

Q14. Select all true answers below in light of the information provided in this course:

  • Capitalized “Direct Instruction” indicates the original approach developed by American educationalist Siegfried Engelmann in the 1960s.
  • Capitalized “Direct Instruction” is identical to “direct instruction.”
  • Lowercase “direct instruction” refers to instruction developed by classroom teachers that are loosely based on the approaches of “Direct Instruction.”
  • Capitalized “Direct Instruction” indicates the original approach developed by Norwegian educationalist Olav Schewe in 2012.

Q15. _ is an approach to teaching where the teacher’s explicit presentation is interwoven with carefully designed active exercises where the students practice what they’ve just learned.

  • Student-centered instruction
  • Cognitive teaching
  • Direct instruction
  • Indirect instruction

Q16. if a student simply sits and studies for an hour, versus taking an hour-long test, she will learn far more while she is studying than when she is taking the test.

  • True
  • False

Q17. Select the single best word to complete the sentence below:

The goal of teacher-directed instruction is to create independent learners who can ultimately direct their own learning. But until students master the material, the teacher leads the lesson and ____ instruction—gradually reducing supports as students experience more and more success.

  • scaffolds
  • withholds
  • minimizes
  • re-frames

Q18. Link it happens at the “__” stage—and beyond—of direct instruction. (Choose the single best answer.)

  • We do
  • You do
  • Learn it
  • I do

Q19. What are two of the best ways to learn through the procedural system?

  • Interleaving
  • Practice that involves spaced repetition.
  • Listen to a lecture

Q20. Select all true options in accordance with the information in this course.

  • The procedural system is involved in our ability to detect complex patterns, such as those in math or language.
  • The brain learns through two fundamental pathways: the declarative and the procedural.
  • We are conscious of the declarative system, but we are not conscious of the procedural system.
  • The procedural system is involved in our ability to learn habits (things you do repeatedly).
  • We are conscious of the procedural system, but we are not conscious of the declarative system.
  • The brain learns through two fundamental pathways: lateral and vertical.
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