Finance for Everyone: Debt Coursera Quiz Answers

All Weeks Finance for Everyone: Debt Coursera Quiz Answers

In Debt, we take on one of the most challenging financial questions that remains unresolved: How much to borrow? We start by demonstrating why using debt has always been and continues to be a great temptation, particularly when borrowing costs are historically low. We identify conditions for selecting the optimal amount of debt for a corporation looking to maximize its value. You’ll become fluent in related concepts like norms and benchmarks.

You will explore these and other factors that influence debt for individuals and for public sector organizations -including governments, who are the largest consumers of debt. Like pollution, debt creates systemic risks even for the people and organizations that don’t create it. This course discusses the imperative of limiting and reducing debt and the costs to all of us if we don’t.

We build on case-based learning giving you opportunities to interpret, uncover and acquire financial information that is often hidden or missing. We also summarize important threads from previous courses to give you a deep and cohesive understanding of when debt works for you and when it becomes your worst enemy.

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Finance for Everyone: Debt Coursera Quiz Answers

Week 1

Quiz 1: Learner Introduction Survey

Q1. Why did you choose to participate in Finance for Everyone: Debt?

What do you think?

Q2. What do you hope to be able to do by the end of this course?

What do you think?

Q3. Have you ever taken steps to manage debt (regardless of whether it’s yours, someone you know, or your workplace)?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Uncertain

Q4. Have you taken Finance for Everyone: Decisions?

  • Yes, and I completed it
  • Yes, but only partially
  • No

Q5. Have you taken Finance for Everyone: Markets?

  • Yes, and I completed it
  • Yes, but only partially
  • No

Q6. Have you taken Finance for Everyone: Value?

  • Yes, and I completed it
  • Yes, but only partially
  • No

Q7. Do you plan to go through all courses of the Finance for Everyone Specialization?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Uncertain at this time

Quiz 2: Practice Quiz: Personal Debt

Q1. Personal finance intersects with economics, politics, psychology, and sociology.

  • True
  • False

Q2. What are collateralized debt obligations (CDOs)?

  • Home loans bundled together as mortgage-backed securities
  • Debt that is secure through diversification
  • Bundled real estate options
  • A specialized government bond

Q3. A credit card is an example of:

  • A short-term liability
  • A long-term liability
  • A short-term asset
  • A long-term asset

Quiz 3: Personal Debt

Q1. Which of the following statements are true concerning borrowing decisions?

  • Borrowing decisions are based on rational calculations and transactional analysis
  • Borrowing decisions are based on rational calculations, transactional analysis, as well as psychological and social factors
  • Borrowing decisions can magnify returns but not losses
  • Most people in developed countries have more equity than debt
  • When interest rates are at historic lows, it is a good idea to borrow

Q2. What is an example of a revolving credit arrangement?

  • Credit Cards and Lines of Credit
  • Home Loans
  • Car Loans
  • Business Loans
  • All of the above

Q3. Access to borrow more is not a “free lunch”. This statement implicates which of the following?

  • Consumer Debt
  • Commercial Debt
  • Sunk Costs
  • Fixed Costs
  • Opportunity Costs

Q4. Which of the following statements applies to student loans?

  • Declaring bankruptcy is the only way a student loans can be discharged
  • Future wages can never be garnished for unpaid student loans
  • Student loans cannot be discharged through bankruptcy
  • Aggregate credit card loans in the US exceeds aggregate student loans
  • Student loans are accompanied with the lowest interest rates in the marketplace

Q5. Information like salaries, interest from savings accounts, and dividends from investments, can be found on which document?

  • Personal Balance Sheet
  • Personal Income Statement
  • Working Capital Statement
  • Personal Cash Flow Statement
  • Personal Net Worth Statement

Q6. Which of the following statements about financial literacy is true?

  • Financial literacy can always be improved no matter what your skill set is
  • You must be a “numbers person” to be financially literate
  • You need to have a strong understanding of accounting to be financially literate
  • It is not necessary for you to be able to create a household budget to be financially literate
  • Most adults are financially literate

Quiz 4: Making a Difference 1

Q1. In this first week of Finance for Everyone: Debt, we have considered the individuals’ interactions with finance – behaviours, financial management, and generally how one can work to increase their financial literacy – a worthy discussion as we near the end of this Specialization!

Reflect on your learning and engagement thus far. What are the takeaway messages that have resonated with you, and how do they connect with current events? What new insights have you gleaned with respect to managing debt?

Regardless of your key insights, we hope you share them online. Post your key learnings, insights, and/or opinions to your learning portfolio or twitter (and make sure to use the hashtag #F4E in your tweets)! You are free to choose the subject of your learning portfolio blog post or tweet; this way, you can focus on topics that catch your interest the most.

Below, submit the link to the tweet or post you’ve written this week, and please go back to your Course Connections discussion post from this week and add it in there as well!

What do you think?

Week 2

Quiz 1: Practice Quiz: Firm Debt Part 1

Q1. If a firm has a debt-to-equity ratio of 20%, then a firm borrows $1 for every $____ in equity.

Enter answer here

Q2. An all equity firm with an EBIT of $3,500, an interest rate of 6%, and 380 shares outstanding has an The Earnings-Per-Share (EPS) of $______.

Enter answer here

Q3. If the same firm was issued $4,000 of debt, it would have an EPS of $ _.

Enter answer here

Quiz 2: Practice Quiz: Firm Debt Part 2

Q1. If Additional financial leverage is always accompanied by
additional financial risk, then if the operating income that is expected to
increase actually decreases, shareholder experience a of earnings per
share (EPS) and the rate of return becomes _
. Fill in the blanks.

  • magnification; volatile
  • magnification; steady
  • demagnification; steady
  • demagnification; volatile

Q2. Which of the following statements are false? Click all that apply.

  • For firms, the government effectively penalizes the cost of debt
  • Dividends that are paid to shareholders are not tax-deductible
  • Debt can be used to reduce a firm’s overall cost of capital
  • The weighted cost of capital refers to the weighted cost of equity that a firm uses

Q3. The two key insights that are central to the Miller and Modigliani (MM) theorem are: __ and the effect of corporate taxes.

  • Interest on debt is tax deductible
  • Debt is cheaper than equity
  • Leveraged firms are more valuable
  • Perfect market efficiency

Quiz 3: Firm Debt

Q1. When a firm is determining its target debt ratio, which of the following is paramount?

  • The impact on the firm’s profits
  • The impact on the value of the firm
  • The impact on the control structure and governance
  • The impact on financial flexibility
  • All of the above are equally important

Q2. If a firm has a debt to equity ratio of 50%, its overall debt ratio must be:

  • 33%
  • 50%
  • 67%
  • 100%
  • 150%

Q3. Assume a firm earns net income of $10,000 with total assets of $200,000 – half of which is debt – and has 20,000 shares outstanding. Based on this information, its EPS (earnings per share), ROA (return on assets) and ROE (return on equity) are respectively:

  • $2.00; 5%; 10%
  • $2.00; 10%; 5%
  • $0.50; 5%; 5%
  • $0.50; 5%; 10%
  • None of the above

Q4. Considering “Indifference analysis”, which indicates the level of operating income (or earnings before interest and tax, EBIT) where EPS (earnings per share) are equal whether the firm uses debt or equity, we can conclude that the following holds:

  • Beyond the indifference point, more debt will maximize EPS
  • Beyond the indifference point, more equity will maximize EPS
  • Using more debt makes EPS more volatile
  • Using more equity makes EPS more volatile
  • Both a) and c) are true

Q5. Miller and Modigliani’s nobel prize winning framework provides all of the following insights, except:

  • Given efficient markets, cheaper debt is offset by more expensive equity so that the firm’s overall cost of capital remains unchanged. This implies the value of the firm is unchanged.
  • Given efficient markets, increasing cash flows increases the value of the firm
  • When firms pay corporate taxes, the value of the firm can increase due to the interest tax shield
  • When firms pay corporate taxes, the firm’s cost of capital decreases
  • The firm can identify a range of capital structures to help determine its target debt ratio

Q6. Which of the following factors influence how much debt a firm should take on?

  • Industry norms
  • The nature of the firm’s assets
  • Financial slack
  • The overall level of interest rates
  • All of the above

Quiz 4: Making a Difference in Week 2

Q1. In this second week of F4E: Debt, we have explored debt from the firm or corporate view. We determined how taking on debt can be a positive strategy for a firm, but conversely, how too much debt can be a strategy that leads to bankruptcy. Furthermore, we touched on the interconnectedness of debt markets, and that turmoil at one level can have an impact that reaches far and wide – from the national to the firm to the individual.

Consider your evolving understanding and level of comfort with debt. Debt can be a very scary topic for many. As you continue to look at debt from different perspectives – individual, corporate, and soon, sovereign – do you find that your confidence with respect to engaging in thought about debt is growing, or that your aversion to discussing and/or thinking about debt is lessening? Are you feeling any more capable assessing your own finances and planning for your future, inclusive of debt management, than before you started this course?

We hope you share your key insights online. Post your key learnings, insights, and/or opinions to your learning portfolio or twitter (and make sure to use the hashtag #F4E in your tweets)! You are free to choose the subject of your learning portfolio blog post or tweet; this way, you can focus on topics that catch your interest the most.

Below, submit the link to the tweet or post you’ve written this week, and please go back to your Course Connections discussion post from this week and add it in there as well!

What do you think?

Week 3

Quiz 1: Practice Quiz: Sovereign Debt Parts I & II

Q1. With household debt, mortgages are the largest portion or
about 2/3 of the total, followed by car loans, then student loans.

  • True
  • False

Q2. What happened when a government default was believed to be
imminent, as was the recent case of the so-called European PIGS (Portugal,
Ireland, Greece and Spain) sovereign debt crisis?

  • Bond yields decreased and bond prices increased
  • Bond prices decreased and bond yields increased
  • Greece entered a period of increased government spending
  • Institutions like the IMF and the ECB refrained from
    providing loans to the troubled economies

Q3. Sovereign debt is unique in a lot of ways, notably because
it is not beholden to the same legal rules as an individual or a firm.

  • True
  • False

Quiz 2: Sovereign Debt

Q1. Which of the following is true about government debt?

  • Most of the US government debt must be paid back to foreign entities
  • Most of the US government debt must be paid back to its citizens
  • Government debt is risk-free
  • Government debt is typically less risky than corporate debt
  • b) and d) are true about government debt

Q2. Governments borrow because:

  • Their tax revenues are not enough to cover their expenditures
  • Of unexpected catastrophes like floods, disease, etc
  • They are expansionist in nature and must finance a war or pay for its defence
  • Of entitlement programs like public health and employment insurance
  • All of the above

Q3. Except for one, all of the following institutions enable other governments to borrow more at a lower cost than they would have on their own:

  • The United Nations
  • The European Central Bank
  • The World Bank
  • The International Monetary Fund
  • The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development

QQ4. What are some of the signs suggesting that developed countries have borrowed too much money?

  • Negative interest rates
  • Large economies like Italy unable to sustain their banking system
  • Deflationary conditions that curtail economic growth
  • a) and b) only
  • a) and b) and c)

Q5. What are some of the ways governments who have borrowed too much can resolve this problem?

  • Borrow more
  • Increase interest rates to make borrowing more difficult
  • Stimulate economic growth through productivity gains and key investments
  • b) and c) only
  • a) and b) and c)

Q6. Which of the following factors almost always explain most market crashes?

  • Speculators
  • Excessive borrowing
  • Lack of government regulations
  • Lack of democratic institutions
  • All of the above

Quiz 3: Making a Difference 3

Q1. In this third week of Finance for Everyone: Debt, we have looked at sovereign debt: how it is unique from other types of debt, how the US dollar is implicated in debt around the world, and how sovereign debt crises can unfold, including their associated impacts.

As you continue to investigate debt from different view points, how has this impacted your engagement with debt moving forward? What are your emerging plans for debt management? Do you intend to continue applying your growing skills of analysis of an entity’s debt position to your life or the lives of others? What future ideas, decisions, and situations do you foresee, and how will the skills or knowledge gained during this course assist you when they occur?

Regardless of your key insights, we hope you share them online. Post your key learnings, insights, and/or opinions to your learning portfolio or twitter (and make sure to use the hashtag #F4E in your tweets)! You are free to choose the subject of your learning portfolio blog post or tweet; this way, you can focus on topics that catch your interest the most.

Below, submit the link to the tweet or post you’ve written this week, and please go back to your Course Connections discussion post from this week and add it in there as well!

What do you think?

Week 4

Quiz 1: End of Course Feedback

Q1. We’d like to take this opportunity to say how much we have appreciated your participation in this course! We want to hear from you, no matter what your intentions were when signing up. The survey should take you no more than about 10 minutes. (please ignore any grades from this survey; Coursera requires non-zero grades for every question, but there are no wrong or right answers)

First, describe one thing you liked about the course: (You may, if you have time and would like to, describe more!)

What do you think?

Q2. Describe one suggested improvement – one you definitely want to see – so we can make the course better for future learners. The more specific your advice, the better. (And again – if you have time and the inclination, describe more than one improvement)

Some questions you might consider are: how could we have better supported your learning? Were there barriers that prevented you from completing the course or a particular activity?

What do you think?

Q3. How did you find the level of difficulty of Finance for Everyone: Debt?

  • Much easier than I expected
  • Easier than I expected
  • Just right
  • More difficult than I expected
  • Much more difficult than I expected

Q4. How did you find the pacing (speed) of the course?

  • Much faster than I expected
  • Faster than I expected
  • Just right
  • Slower than I expected
  • Much slower than I expected

Q5. We’ll now ask you to rate your satisfaction on a variety of course elements. What is your level of satisfaction with the Course Instructor?

  • Excellent
  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor
  • N/A

Q6. What is your level of satisfaction with the Video Lectures?

  • Excellent
  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor
  • N/A

Q7. What is your level of satisfaction with the Quizzes?

  • Excellent
  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor
  • N/A

Q8. What is your level of satisfaction with the Course Connection Activities & Discussion Forums?

  • Excellent
  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor
  • N/A

Q9. What is your level of satisfaction with the Making a Difference activities?

  • Excellent
  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor
  • N/A

Q10. What is your level of satisfaction with the case activity?

  • Excellent
  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor
  • N/A

Q11. What is your level of satisfaction with the LearnSmart activities?

  • Excellent
  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor
  • N/A

Q12. Do you have any additional comments regarding any of the above course elements, or about the course in general, that you’d like to provide?

What do you think?
Finance for Everyone: Debt Coursera Quiz Answers Course Review:

In our experience, we suggest you enroll in Finance for Everyone: Debt courses and gain some new skills from Professionals completely free and we assure you will be worth it.

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This course is intended for audiences of all experiences who are interested in learning about new skills in a business context; there are no prerequisite courses.

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Get All Course Quiz Answers of Finance for Everyone Specialization

Finance for Everyone: Decisions Coursera Quiz Answers

Finance for Everyone: Markets Coursera Quiz Answers

Finance For Everyone: Value Coursera Quiz Answers

Finance for Everyone: Debt Coursera Quiz Answers

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