Communication Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Get All Weeks Communication Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

This Specialization is aimed at preparing students for undergraduate study in an English-speaking university. The course equips you for full participation and engagement with your studies by building awareness and understanding of the core values and expectations of academic culture, and providing you with practical strategies to apply to your studies.

In this course, you will learn how to develop your Communication Skills to help you achieve success in your university studies. After completing this course, you will be able to:

1. Recognise the importance of communication in communities of practice at university

2. Understand contexts of communication at university and associated expectations

3. Communicate clearly across a variety of different contexts and to a wide range of audiences by adapting communicative styles appropriately

4. Demonstrate, negotiate, and further understanding through spoken, written, visual, and conversational modes

5. Effectively formulate arguments and communicate research findings through the process of researching, composing, and editing

6. Confidently engage in constructive and critical dialogue with respect and professionalism

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Week 01: Communication Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 1.1 Practice Quiz

Q1. Which of the following are learning objectives for this MOOC?

Check all that apply.

  • Critically evaluate the reliability of sources for
    an academic context.
  • Communicate clearly across a variety of different
    contexts and to a wide range of audiences by adapting communicative styles
    appropriately according to cultural and societal expectations.
  • Confidently engage in constructive and critical dialogue with respect and professionalism.
  • Recognize the importance & function of problem
    solving & creative thought within academic study.
  • Understand the importance and function of critical
    thinking in academic culture.
  • Apply problem-solving strategies to issues related to university life & study.

Q2. Which of the following are NON-assessed activities on this MOOC?

Check all that apply.

  • In video questions & polls.
  • Short quizzes after each lesson
  • Quizzes after each module
  • Discussion board posts.
  • Final summative assessment.

Q3. What percentage of your total marks is the final summative assessment worth?

Check one option only.

  • 3%
  • 15%
  • 53%
  • 35%

Quiz 2: 1.2 Practice Quiz

Q1. What is academic culture?

Check one option.

  • Clothes and other paraphernalia with the university’s logo printed on them
  • The types of food available on campus.
  • The beliefs, principles and approaches to study, work and life that a university upholds.

Q2. In lesson 1.2b, what form of communication does Helen Drury say is a core form of communication in academic culture?

Check one option.

  • Writing
  • Face-to-face interaction.
  • Reading
  • Presentations

Q3. According to Alyssa O’Brien in lesson 1.2b, how long does it take to master communication skills?

Check one option.

  • 1 year
  • 2-3 years
  • Your whole life.
  • 5 years

Quiz 3: 1.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. In lesson 1.3a several students talk about how they stay motivated. Which of the following ways of staying motivated did they mention?

Check two options.

  • Getting a high-paying job at the end.
  • Meeting new people in university clubs.
  • Gaining new knowledge.
  • Going out, or talking with friends

Q2. What are the two elements of resilience that Simon Messner refers to in lesson 1.3b?

Check two options.

  • The ability to bounce back quickly when you experience a stressful situation.
  • Being able to write for long periods of time.
  • Maintaining your motivation over a long period.
  • The ability to adapt to stressful situations.

Q3. What are two ways to stay motivated according to Simon Messner in lesson 1.3b?

Check two options.

  • Have long-term and short-term goals, and reflect back on them.
  • Always study by yourself to avoid distraction.
  • Create a study timetable based on the best time of day for you to study.
  • Vary where you study every day to maintain interest.

Quiz 4: 1.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. Consider the following situation.

Mike is a first year undergraduate studying
Philosophy at university and his housemate, Jon, is a first year Nutrition
student. As part of one of his courses, Jon needs to collect data on the eating
habits of first year university students. To do this, he has asked Mike and
nine of his other friends to keep a record of what they eat, and when, for a
week.

Mike agrees to help, and keeps a fairly accurate
record of what he has eaten. When the week is up Jon asks Mike to email him his
data. However, when Mike is typing up his eating habits for the week, he
realises that he hasn’t eaten any vegetables at all. Not wanting to seem
unhealthy, especially because he doesn’t want Jon to judge him, he pretends
that he made a pumpkin soup and adds that to his list. He also adds a couple of
salads to some of his main meals and deletes one of the chocolate bars. Satisfied,
he emails the list to Jon.

What is the problem in this scenario?

Check one option.

  • Jon didn’t go through ethics approval before
    collecting his data.
  • Mike is a Philosophy student and therefore Jon shouldn’t have asked him.
  • Jon should have asked strangers, not his
    friends, to collect the data for his assignment
  • Mike is falsifying data and this will twist the
    results of Jon’s research.

Q2.Consider the following situation.

Mike is a first year undergraduate studying
Philosophy at university and his housemate, Jon, is a first year Nutrition
student. As part of one of his courses, Jon needs to collect data on the eating
habits of first year university students. To do this, he has asked Mike and
nine of his other friends to keep a record of what they eat, and when, for a
week.

Mike agrees to help, and keeps a fairly accurate
record of what he has eaten. When the week is up Jon asks Mike to email him his
data. However, when Mike is typing up his eating habits for the week, he
realises that he hasn’t eaten any vegetables at all. Not wanting to seem
unhealthy, especially because he doesn’t want Jon to judge him, he pretends
that he made a pumpkin soup and adds that to his list. He also adds a couple of
salads to some of his main meals and deletes one of the chocolate bars.
Satisfied, he emails the list to Jon.

Can
Jon get in trouble for academic
misconduct?

Check one option.

  • No, Mike is in a different field to Jon and therefore it doesn’t matter.
  • No, though it will tarnish his results and not make them valid.
  • Yes, because he hasn’t collected data from a random sample and instead used his friends
  • Yes, because he is putting Mike in an uncomfortable position by collecting data about his health and his eating habits.

Q3. Consider the following situation.

Mike is a first year undergraduate studying Philosophy at university and his housemate, Jon, is a third year Nutrition student. As part of one of his courses, Jon needs to collect data on the eating habits of first year university students. To do this, he has asked Mike and nine of his other friends to keep a record of what they eat, and when, for a week.

Mike agrees to help, and keeps a fairly accurate record of what he has eaten. When the week is up Jon asks Mike to email him his data. However, when Mike is typing up his eating habits for the week, he realises that he hasn’t eaten any vegetables at all. Not wanting to seem unhealthy, especially because he doesn’t want Jon to judge him, he pretends that he made a pumpkin soup and adds that to his list. He also adds a couple of salads to some of his main meals and deletes one of the chocolate bars. Satisfied, he emails the list to Jon.

Can Mike get in trouble for academic misconduct?

Check one option

  • Yes, because he has plagiarized.
  • No, he hasn’t violated academic integrity
  • No, he can’t get in trouble for academic misconduct.
  • Yes, because he is not being honest.
  • Yes, because he has falsified data.

Quiz 5: Summative Quiz – Module 1

Q1. “A wise man … proportions his belief to the evidence.” – David Hume

What quality of academic culture does this relate to?

Check one option.

  • The need for proof to support opinions.
  • The use of research to produce knowledge.
  • The contingent nature of academic knowledge.
  • The importance of independent learning.

Q2.Dave is going to give a presentation in his human resource management class tomorrow.
He needs to present on the topic of organisational communication, but he has
been busy with work and other assessments, and doesn’t have much of an idea
about what to do. He remembers that last semester he gave a presentation on
organisational behaviour, and that he could just copy and paste certain
portions from that presentation into his current one to save time.

What
kind of academic misconduct would Dave be committing if he used part of his
previous presentation?

Check one option.

  • Plagiarism
  • Cheating
  • Fabrication of data
  • Falsification of data
  • Facilitation of academic misconduct
  • It isn’t academic misconduct because Dave made
    the original presentation.

Q3.Throughout high school Tomoko had hoped to go to university and study something creative.
She always enjoyed drama and art classes at school, and even received a prize
for her artwork in her final year of school. Tomoko got a very good mark in her
university entrance exam and her parents convinced her to study business law.
Unfortunately, throughout her first year she has struggled with motivation.

What are
some things Tomoko could try in order to stay motivated at university,
according to lesson 1.3b?

Check three options.

  • She could try positive visualisation and imagine
    herself as successful.
  • She could employ cognitive behavioural therapy
    to change some of her habits.
  • She should keep things in her life in balance,
    and make sure she has time for activities outside university such as meeting
    friends, exercising or practicing her art.
  • She could plan her time better.
  • She could identify her key strengths in the
    course and how to use them.
  • She could think about her personal values and
    goals and whether they align with her course of study.

Q4. How are critical thinking and communication linked, according to the academics in 1.2b?

Check two options.

  • Communication is needed to form an argument, and
    thus display critical thinking.
  • Communication is critical to thinking.
  • Communication is necessary to engage in questioning,
    which is central to critical thinking and academic culture in general.
  • You need to be able to communicate in order to
    criticise others.

Q5. Why are communication skills important at university, according to the academics in 1.2b?

Check two options.

  • So that you can communicate effectively with
    administrative staff if you have any problems.
  • Because communication forms a relationship
    between people and also with bodies of knowledge.
  • Because good ideas are not much use unless you
    can communicate it.
  • Because communication skills are necessary for
    online communication in the 21st century.

Quiz 6: Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 1

Q1. Remember you need to record your participation to pass this assessment item.

Did you contribute at least two posts to the discussion board for this module?

Be honest. . . 🙂

  • Yes, I did!
  • No, I didn’t.

Week 2: Communication Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 2.1 Practice Quiz

Q1. Which of the following are texts?

Check all that apply

  • An interpretive dance performance about migration
  • A piece of hip hop graffiti on a wall.
  • A game of football
  • A conversation between a student and an administrative staff member over options for deferring a course for half a year

Q2.Consider the following rhetorical situation.

A student is having some financial difficulties and needs to work full-time and
save money. They are unable to study while they are working, and the student
needs to defer for half a year. They go to the student support centre in their
university, and talk to an administrative staff member about their options. The
student support centre is organised like a bank or other customer support
centre, with officers sitting at individual desks and university marketing
material on the walls. The staff member consults texts on their computer as
they talk to the computer. At the end of the consultation the student goes away
to consider their options.

What
is the purpose in this rhetorical situation?

Check one option.

  • a. To defer for six months from university
  • b. To talk to an administrative staff member
  • c. To consult texts on a computer
  • d. To give advice and assistance to students with issues surrounding their enrolment and other related matters at university.

Q3. Consider the following rhetorical situation.

A student is having some financial difficulties and needs to work full-time and
save money. They are unable to study while they are working and the student
needs to defer for half a year. They go to the student support centre in their
university, and talk to an administrative staff member about their options. The
student support centre is organised like a bank or other customer support
centre, with officers sitting at individual desks and university marketing
material on the walls. The staff member consults texts on their computer as
they talk to the computer. At the end of the consultation the student goes away
to consider their options.

Based on this information, which of the following can be considered social and
political influences on this rhetorical situation?

Check two options.

  • a. Class differences between the student and the administrative staff member
  • b. The marketization of universities which leads to administrative areas such as this
    resembling more commercial spaces
  • c. Unionization of administrative staff members
  • d. A lack of financial support for students

Quiz 2: 2.2 Practice Quiz

Q1. What advice does Dr Alyssa O’Brien give for making the most out of lectures?

Check two options.

  • a. Build a relationship with your lecturer.
  • b. Read the course readings.
  • c. Talk to your classmates.
  • d. Sit at the back.

Q2. What two observations does Dr Marie Stevenson make about students working in groups?

Check two options.

  • a. Younger students tend to let older students do the bulk of the work.
  • b. Females tend to let males do the bulk of the work.
  • c. Non-native speakers tend to let native speakers do the bulk of the work.
  • d. Part-time students tend to let full-time students do the bulk of the work.

Q3. What advice do the students give for communicating effectively at university?

Check two options.

  • a. Refer to your work experience when communicating at university.
  • b. Attend orientation week.
  • c. Follow up emails with spoken conversations.
  • d. Attend talks.

Quiz 3: 2.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. What form of lecture note-taking is this text?

Check one option.

  • a. Cornell format
  • b. Numeric-alphabetic format
  • c. Oxford format
  • d. Outline format

Q2. Jiyoung is an international student from Korea
studying in Australia. In the past, she has had trouble participating in
seminars, but over the last month, she has successfully attained her goal ‘Speak
once in a seminar.’ According to lesson 2.3a, what goals can she set herself
now to increase her participation?

Check two options.

  • a. Refer back to what someone else contributed to the discussion.
  • b. Challenge an argument made in the seminar.
  • c. Speak twice in each seminar.
  • d. Make a presentation.

Q3. What are two things you can do to participate actively
in tutorials?

Check two options.

  • a. Bring questions from the lectures.
  • b. Speak as much as possible.
  • c. Keep up with the other parts of your course.
  • d. Talk about what you’re doing on the weekend.

Quiz 4: 2.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. Consider the following situation.

You are in a Political Science tutorial examining non-traditional security. Your
tutor has given you a hypothetical scenario involving a security threat. There
are four people in your group – Steve, Gwen, Myriam and Ajay. You each have to
play a role as the head of a government department. You must work together to
coordinate your departments after the security incident. Myriam, who is playing
Minister for Immigration, is the first to speak, saying, ‘We’ll call the army
to secure the airports.’

Myriam’s statement is an example of …

Check one option.

  • a. a proposal
  • b. an assertive
  • c. a joint activity
  • d. an assertion

Q2. Consider the following situation.

You
are in a Political Science tutorial examining non-traditional security. Your
tutor has given you a hypothetical scenario involving a security threat. There
are four people in your group – Steve, Gwen, Myriam and Ajay. You each have to
play a role as the head of a government department. You must work together to
coordinate your departments after the security incident. Myriam, who is playing
Minister for Immigration, is the first to speak, saying, ‘We’ll call the army
to secure the airports.’

Is
Myriam’s use of an assertion here a good idea?

Check
one option.

  • a. Yes, because she is role-playing the head of a government department.
  • b. Yes, because someone needs to take control in this situation.
  • c. No, because she should be quiet and wait for the other members to speak.
  • d. No, because she is amongst peers.

Q3. Consider the following situation.

You are in a Political Science tutorial examining non-traditional security. Your tutor has given you a
hypothetical scenario involving a security threat. There are four people in
your group – Steve, Gwen, Myriam and Ajay. You each have to play a role as the
head of a government department. You must work together to coordinate your
departments after the security incident. Myriam, who is playing Minister for
Immigration, is the first to speak, saying, ‘We’ll call the army to secure the
airports.’

Myriam’s assertion here is probably not the best thing to say to coordinate
this group activity, and she should instead use a proposal. What would be a
good example of a proposal she could use?

Check one option.

  • a. Call the army to secure the airports.
  • b. How about we call the army to secure the airports?
  • c. Nice weather we’re having, isn’t it?
  • d. Calling the army is a crypto-fascist response that imperils democracy.

Quiz 5: Summative Quiz – Module 2

Q1. What is the purpose of a tutorial or recitation?

Check one option.

  • Interaction between the tutor and the students.
  • To provide one-on-one tutoring to students.
  • To impress your tutor.
  • To practice and extend lecture content through
    discussions and problem sets.

Q2. Which of the following is an assertion?

Check two options.

  • “The next step is to write up the results.”
  • “I think the next step is writing up the
    results, but um, what do you guys think?”
  • “Write up the results by Friday.”
  • “We might start with writing up the results.”

Q3. Which of the following is a proposal?

Check two options.

  • “The next step is to write up the results.”
  • “I think the next step is writing up the
    results, but um, what do you guys think?”
  • “We might start with writing up the results.”
  • “Write up the results by Friday.”

Q4. What advice does Dr George Ridgway give for getting the most out of your tutorials?

Check one option.

  • Only talk to your tutor.
  • Guide other people through the topic of the tutorial.
  • Be engaged with the topic of the tutorial.
  • Present to the other people in the tutorial.

Q5. What suggestions do the students make about how to find out what is expected of you from an assignment?

Check two options.

  • Make an appointment to meet with a lecturer or tutor.
  • Check the unit of study outline.
  • Email administrative staff with the faculty.
  • Asking your friends from high school.

Q6. You’re in a lecture for your course on ‘Cross-cultural communication’ on the topic of code-switching and
translanguaging. Which of the following are suitable ways to participate during
the lecture?

Check two options.

  • Ask a question about whether you can have an extension for your assignment that’s due next week.
  • Ask a question on what ‘translanguaging’ means.
  • Ask a question at the end about what Gumperz
  • meant about contextualization cues, which was mentioned in the readings.
  • Do the readings for the week on your laptop.

Q7. Consider the following situation.

You are studying a unit titled ‘Pedagogy and Professional Practice’ as part of your education degree. 10% of your final mark is a reflective blog, where students must reflect on course content and relate it to their experiences in the classroom. Students are also expected to respond to others’ blog posts.

Who is the audience in this rhetorical situation?

Check one option.

  • Students and administrative staff
  • Administrative staff
  • Lectures
  • Lecturers and administrative staff
  • Lecturers and students
  • Students

Q8. Consider the following situation.

You are studying a unit titled ‘Pedagogy and Professional Practice’ as part of your
education degree. 10% of your final mark is a reflective blog, where students
must reflect on course content and relate it to their experiences in the
classroom. Students are also expected to respond to others blog posts.

What is the purpose in this rhetorical situation?

Check one option.

  • To assess students
  • To gain marks
  • To reflect on your own and other students’ ideas and experiences
  • To write a blog

Quiz 6: Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 2

Q1. Remember you need to record your participation to pass this assessment.

Did you complete at least two posts to the discussion board for this module?

Be honest . . . 🙂

  • Yes, I did.
  • No, I didn’t.

Week 3: Communication Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 3.1 Practice Quiz

Q1. What are two ways that Dr Marie Stevenson says
university students can do to understand their lecturer’s expectations for
written assignments?

  • a. Read the assignment instructions carefully.
  • b. Ask the lecturer questions.
  • c. Guess what the lecturer expects based on
    comments they make in the lectures.
  • d. Do the same thing that you did for another unit
    with a similar written assignment.

Q2. Helen Drury describes the main differences between three types of writing you will
encounter at university – essays, reports, and proposals. Which of the three
text types are the following notes referring to?

  1. Audience
    is important for this text o Usually
    written for a client, boss etc
  2. Persuasive
    text, including cost implications, feasibility etc
  3. Has
    a definite structure

Check one
option.

  • a. Essays
  • b. Reports
  • c. Proposals

Q3. Helen Drury describes the main differences between three types of writing you will
encounter at university – essays, reports, and proposals. Which of the three
text types are the following notes referring to?

  1. Typically
    persuasive
  2. Must
    take a position in the introduction
  3. Your
    voice must be clear throughout

Check one option.

  • a. Essays
  • b. Reports
  • c. Proposals

Quiz 2: 3.2 Practice Quiz

Q1. What is a key concept in
an essay question?

Check one option.

  • a. An often abstract idea, theory or belief that
    needs to be defined or explored.
  • b. A static, unproblematic idea that needs to be
    included in your essay.
  • c. A key idea with known and consistent effects
    that you need to describe in detail.
  • d. A specific word such as discuss, analyse or compare
    that tells you what you need to do in the essay.

Q2. What do you do if you are
unsure about what kind of text (essay, research report, professional report,
proposal, reflection etc.) you are required to produce for a particular
assignment (and your course outline isn’t clear)?

Check one option.

  • a. Choose whichever text you know you can do best.
  • b. Ask your lecturer or tutor.
  • c. Choose the same kind of text as what you
    produced for your last assignment.
  • d. Ask a friend or other student in the class.

Q3. What rhetorical areas
will have the biggest effect on how
you write a report at university?

Check two options.

  • a. Author
  • b. Place
  • c. Audience
  • d. Purpose
  • e. Media
  • f. Social and political influences

Quiz 3: 3.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. Why do we conduct research for essays?

Check three options.

  • a. So you can copy paragraphs to use in your essay.
  • b. So you can support an idea that you already
    have.
  • c. So you can support a well-known fact.
  • d. To find out more about an idea or concept you
    aren’t sure of.
  • e. To help refine an idea.

Q2. When should you conduct research?

Check two options

  • a. As soon as you get your question
  • b. During the planning stage
  • c. Only after you’ve written a first draft
  • d. While you are drafting your assignment

Q3. Generally, where do references to other sources appear in a research report?

Check three options.

  • a. Reference list
  • b. Results
  • c. Title
  • d. Introduction
  • e. Discussion

Quiz 4: 3.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. What is a thesis statement?

Check one option.

  • a. A short, single sentence that summarises your
    response to the question
  • b. The first sentence of your essay
  • c. A short but detailed paragraph answering the
    question, similar to an introduction
  • d. Your main argument

Q2. For research reports, in which of the following sections would you find background information or
references to general principles in your field?

Check one option.

  • a. Results
  • b. Conclusion
  • c. Rule
  • d. Introduction

Q3. Consider the following structure.

  1. Opening paragraph
  2. Identification of
    problem or situation
  3. Presentation of data
  4. Processing of data
  5. Closing

What
is this an example of?

Check one option.

  • a. Hand’s structure for essays
  • b. Johnson’s structure for research reports
  • c. Reynold’s structure for presentations
  • d. Lung’s structure for professional reports

Quiz 5: Summative Quiz – Module 3

Q1. Consider the following question.

In groups of 3-4, develop an online marketing strategy for the product and business of your choice. Write a … … to the company’s board of directors detailing your marketing strategy. Your …. . should include:

  1. an executive summary
  2. an overview of relevant literature for online marketing in that industry
  3. details of the target markets and possible online marketing strategies
  4. reasons for your choices, along with reasons why the company should adopt your strategy.

This assignment is an example of a/an …

Check one option.

  • proposal
  • essay
  • report

Q2.Consider the following question.

“Beneath their surface of playfulness,
the Harry Potter series of books contain darker truths more suitable for adults
rather than children.” Do you agree? If
so, what might they be? You may choose to discuss particular scenes or
recurrent themes in detail.

This
assignment is an example of a/an …

Check one option.

  • proposal
  • essay
  • report

Q3. Consider the following question.

“Analyse the role of ritual as a
means of social control in the Classical period (250-900AD) of Maya culture.

Word limit: 1,500. ”

Which
of the following things do you think you would be expected to do in this essay?

Check three options.

  • Discuss different theories that suggest rituals
    are used as a means of social control
  • Describe in detail how certain rituals were
    performed during the Classical period of Maya culture using specific
    archaeological evidence to support your claims.
  • Analyse how specific rituals of the Classical
  • period of Maya culture did/did not provide a means of social control.
  • Describe the kinds of rituals in the Classical
    period of Maya culture.
  • Provide a comprehensive list of all of the
    rituals performed during the Classical period of Maya culture.
  • Provide an anecdote of a time when you visited the Maya archaeological site of Calakmul in Campeche, Mexico.

Q4. Which of the following points are true about professional reports at university?

Check three options.

  • Purpose is to show familiarity with experimental
    methods.
  • Their structure is usually Introduction-Methodology- Results-Discussion/Conclusion.
  • They have both real audiences and imagined audiences.
  • May follow guidelines set by professional bodies or publishers.
  • Language must be brief and key points quickly
    understood.
  • A key aim of these reports is to display
    understanding of how knowledge is generated in your field.

Q5. How do you use research in essays, according to lesson 3.3a?

Check two options.

  • To add authority to our arguments.
  • To clarify our main ideas.
  • In order to copy the other sources’ text and use
    it in our own.
  • To make it look like we have read a lot.

Q6. Where do most references to other information sources generally occur in professional
reports?

Check one option.

  • You generally don’t need to do research for professional reports.
  • In
    the middle as you present your data.
  • Towards the end as you present any
    recommendations you might have.
  • Towards the beginning, as you contextualise the
    problem or situation you are addressing with other sources.

Q7. Consider the following essay question.

“‘For all its revolutionary
gestures, Fight
Club ultimately reinforces a
conservative, hegemonic model of masculinity.’ Do you agree or disagree?

Which
of the following is the best example of a thesis statement for this essay question?

  • Despite the masculine themes of Fight Club, the movie contains a
    significant feminist subtext which questions rather than reinforces a hegemonic
    model of masculinity.
  • Subject positions allocated to male characters
    range from the patriarchal and hegemonic through to the highly feminised.
  • A conservative, hegemonic model of masculinity
    can be seen in both the narrator’s relationship with Tyler Durden and in the
    activities of the fight club itself.
  • Possibly Fight
    Club’s most striking scenes are the fight scenes in the ‘fight club’
    itself.

Q8. Consider the following abstract from a research report. Each sentence has been numbered.

1.This study researches the
relationship between managers’ and employees’ perceptions of person-job fit
(P-J) and person-organisation fit (P-O). 2. Survey data were gathered from 345
employees and 62 managers from a multinational logistics company. 3. The data
showed that there was a low correlation between manager’s and employee’s
perceptions of P-J fit. 4. However, there was a much greater correlation
between the two groups’ perceptions of P-O fit. 5. The study highlights the
need for greater communication and consistency within organisations on job
expectations and best fit to jobs.

Which
sentence or sentences are the Results section?

Check one option.

  • Sentence 1.
  • Sentences 3 and 4.
  • Sentence 3.
  • Sentence 5.
  • Sentence 2.
  • Sentences 4 and 5.
  • Sentence 4.
  • Sentences 1 and 2.

Quiz 6: Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 3

Q1. Remember! You need to record your participation to pass this assessment item.

Did you contribute at least two posts to the discussion board for this module?

  • Yes, I did!
  • No, I didn’t.

Week 4: Communication Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 4.1 Practice Quiz

Q1. What two pieces of advice does Dr Marie Stevenson give for writing a good first draft?

Check two options.

  • a. Get started.
  • b. Make a plan and stick to it.
  • c. Make a plan and be flexible.
  • d. Focus on your language use.

Q2. What two pieces of advice does Dr Helen Drury give for refining and editing a first
draft?

Check two options.

  • a. Rewrite all your topic sentences.
  • b. Try to understand your topic better.
  • c. Check that your introduction matches your conclusion.
  • d. Read you topic sentences to make sure they predict the main idea of the paragraph.

Q3. How does Dr Alyssa O’Brien see use of visual aids at university as different from using
visuals in other rhetorical situations?

Check two options.

  • a. Visual aids serve as evidence for your argument.
  • b. They can be shared on social media.
  • c. Visual aids must be made by academics.
  • d. Visual aids must be cited correctly.

Quiz 2: 4.2 Practice Quiz

Q1. According to Sowton
(2012), what are the three functions of an essay introduction?

Check
3 options.

  • a. A map
  • b. A mirror
  • c. A microphone
  • d. A marketing tool
  • e. A microscope
  • f. A microcosm

Q2. Which of the following
are characteristics of the language of professional reports?

Check two options.

  • a. The sentences are less complex than in formal academic writing.
  • b. Use of recommendations
  • c. Long noun phrases
  • d. Passive verb forms

Q3. Consider
the following excerpt from a university essay.

Crop
rotation changed considerably in the 18th century in Britain.
Farmers in Flanders pioneered a four-field crop rotation system which meant
fewer fields were left fallow. Charles Townsend introduced this to Britain,
and, as a result, crop yields improved. The introduction of greater cultivation
of turnips and clover also lead to a rise in the number of ruminant animals
raised, and the use of these animals increased yields of meat and dairy
products.

What can
this writer do to improve cohesion in this passage?

Check one option.

  • a. Use word chains.
  • b. Use pronouns to refer to other parts of the text.
  • c. Use conjunctions.
  • d. Use Theme-New structures to connect sentences better.

Quiz 3: 4.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. Consider the following essay question.

Discuss
the series of events that led to the First World War. What part did the system
of alliances play in causing the conflict? Was a military arms race between the
Great Powers a major influence? Did colonialism play a part in leading to the
conflict?

Here is a student’s essay
introduction and conclusion in response to this question.

The
First World War was one of the largest conflicts of the 20th
century, leading to millions of deaths both in Europe and around the world. Unlike
other conflicts in the 20th century, the causes of the conflict were many and
various, and historians have had a difficult time deciding what the primary
causes were. The system of alliances, rising militarism amongst the Great
Powers, the politics surrounding a united Germany, and even the Industrial
Revolution have been posited as short and long term causes of the war. However,
it is two of these in particular – the system of alliances in Europe, and a
military arms race in Europe – that were particularly prominent causes of the conflict.

To
sum up, the combination of the system of alliances and rising militarism
amongst European countries – leading to an arms race amongst the countries –
were the two main causes of the First World War. The system of alliances lead
to an “excessively rigid framework” (Taylor, 1969), which was unable to deal
with diplomatic events such as the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.
Coupled with this was the immense military buildup and planning amongst the
Great Powers, which created a great impetus for war. It is these two issues, in
excess of others, that led to the bloodshed of the First World War.

The student has
unfortunately failed to address one part of the question. Which part of the
question has the student failed to answer?

Check
one option.

  • a. The system of alliances amongst the Great
    Powers.
  • b. The role of colonialism in causing the First
    World War.
  • c. The military arms race as a cause of the
    First World War.
  • d. Domestic issues for the European Great
    Powers.

Q2. Which of the following
techniques for polishing and refining academic writing are usually specific to writing reports and
proposals?

Check
two options.

  • a. Writing section headings.
  • b. Writing an abstract or executive summary.
  • c. Make a reverse outline.
  • d. Check that you have answered the question.

Q3. Consider the following
information graphic and corresponding text in a design specification report,
detailing the creation and usage of an online resource for stroke survivors.

“Usage
of the SmartSurvive site gradually increased throughout 2015. After its launch
in January, the first quarter saw 325 visitors to the site. Usage plateaued in
the second and third quarters at 450 and 475 visitors respectively, before
jumping to 595 visitors in the last quarter.”

Which of the following
statements about the visual aid and accompanying writing are true?

Check
two options.

  • a. The student has failed to adequately describe
    the main information from the visual aid in the writing.
  • b. The visual aid has not been properly labelled.
  • c. The wrong form of visual aid has been used.
  • d. The visual aid doesn’t work together with the
    text.

Quiz 4: 4.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. Why does Sowton (2012) suggest reading your text
backwards?

Check one option.

  • a. To check the structure
  • b. To make a reverse outline
  • c. To check the grammar
  • d. To check for font use

Q2. How can you use the search function on a word processor
to check your writing before submission?

Check one options.

  • a. To check for names in references
  • b. To check the formatting
  • c. To check for correct paragraph structure.

Q3. What question should you ask yourself first when checking
the format of your writing?

Check one option.

  • a. “Are the paragraphs indented?”
  • b. “What number paragraph is this?”
  • c. “Have I followed my lecturer’s formatting guide?”
  • d. “Does this look like an essay/report?”

Quiz 5: Summative Quiz – Module 4

Q1. Consider the following text from a student essay.

Performance management can be defined as the set of practices within an organisation designed to measure and improve staff performance (DeNisi & Pritchard, 2006). The first element of performance management – to measure staff performance – is often termed performance appraisal. Performance management’s second main part – to improve staff performance – is more commonly connected with human resource development. Performance management’s role in measuring staff performance can be traced all the way back to the work of Frederick Taylor and scientific management. On the other hand, performance management’s role in improving staff performance is more recent, deriving inspiration from the work of Elton Mayo and the influence of humanist psychology on the study of business.

What element of coherence can be used to improve this writing?

Choose one answer.

  • Don’t use over-complicated grammar
  • Use a logical division of ideas.
  • Order the writing into chronological order.
  • Clearly state their main ideas.

Q2. Consider the following text from a student essay.

Performance management can be defined as the set of practices within an organisation designed to measure and improve staff performance (DeNisi & Pritchard, 2006). The first element of performance management – to measure staff performance – is often termed performance appraisal. Performance management’s second main part – to improve staff performance – is more commonly connected with human resource development. Performance management’s role in measuring staff performance can be traced all the way back to the work of Frederick Taylor and scientific management. On the other hand, performance management’s role in improving staff performance is more recent, deriving inspiration from the work of Elton Mayo and the influence of humanist psychology on the study of business.

What element of cohesion can be used to improve this writing?

Choose one answer.

  • Greater use of conjunctions.
  • Use of pronouns to avoid repetition.
  • Greater use of word chains.
  • Use Theme-New structures to connect sentences.

Q3. Is the following sentence more characteristic of research reports, or professional reports? Why?

Check
one option.

  • “The
    rapid development of the Chinese hybrid economic model may largely be
    attributed to the reforms initiated by Chen Yun in the late 1970s and early
    1980s.”
  • Professional report, because it is referring to
    business
  • Research report, because it uses passive forms
    and hedging.
  • Professional report, because it is making a recommendation.
  • Research report, because it is referring to
    historical findings.

Q4. What are two pieces of advice about writing essays and reports that the academics in lesson 4.1 give?

Check
two options.

  • Make a plan but be flexible.
  • Focus carefully on your language use when writing your first draft.
  • Write your executive summary first.
  • Cite any visual aids taken from other sources correctly.

Q5. Consider the following data on the proportion of female employees in 6 companies.

Company

Proportion of female employees

Company 1

39%

Company 2

29%

Company 3

58%

Company 4

48%

Company 5

73%

Company 6

45%

Which form of data graphic would best
represent this information?

Check
one option.

  • Line graph.
  • Venn diagram.
  • Bar chart.
  • Pie chart.

Q6. Consider the following excerpt taken from the final draft of an essay on leadership.

The
first form of leadership identified by Burns (cited in Hays, 2016),
transactional leadership, is commonly associated with everyday management.
Transactional leadership is largely seen as recruiting the participation of
employees through material rewards, and in cases where employees do not follow
directives, through punishments. The appeal of the transactional leader is
attained by appealing to employees own self-interest through such things as
incentives and job security. The transactional leader is seen as someone who is
responsive to external threats and directives from leaders above, and largely
works within the organizational culture. Their overall objective is to maintain
the status quo. Many writers feel that the transactional leader is somehow
inferior to the transformational leader outlined below, but in my opinion
organisations need transactional leaders as much as transformational leaders.
If an organisation had too many transformational leaders, it would be a case of
‘too many chiefs not enough Indians’. In contrast with transactional leaders,
transformational leaders are seen as proactive rather than just reactive.
Transformational leaders inspire followers through their ideals, idea and
morals rather than ….

What structural issue does this excerpt have?

Check
one option.

  • It lacks cohesion.
  • The paragraphing is wrong.
  • It lacks coherence.
  • It doesn’t answer the question.

Q7. Consider the following excerpt taken from the final draft of an essay on leadership.

The first form of leadership identified by Burns (cited in Hays, 2016), transactional leadership, is commonly associated with everyday management. Transactional leadership is largely seen as recruiting the participation of employees through material rewards, and in cases where employees do not follow directives, through punishments. The appeal of the transactional leader is attained by appealing to employees own self-interest through such things as incentives and job security. The transactional leader is seen as someone who is responsive to external threats and directives from leaders above, and largely works within the organizational culture. Their overall objective is to maintain the status quo. Many writers feel that the transactional leader is somehow inferior to the transformational leader outlined below, but in my opinion organisations need transactional leaders as much as transformational leaders. If an organisation had too many transformational leaders, it would be a case of ‘too many chiefs not enough Indians’. In contrast with transactional leaders, transformational leaders are seen as proactive rather than just reactive. Transformational leaders inspire followers through their ideals, idea and morals rather than ….

What language issues does this excerpt have?

Check two options.

  • It is sometimes too personal in tone.
  • It contains some grammar errors.
  • It sometimes is more like spoken language.
  • It contains a double negative.

Q8. When you are checking that you have answered your question when polishing your essay, there are three steps
suggested in lesson 4.3a. Here are the three steps presented out of order:

  1. Highlight the sentences in your
    introduction and conclusion that address each part.
  2. Highlight which topic sentences
    address each part.
  3. Break down the question into its
    relevant parts

What is the correct order for this
process?

  • 3, 2, 1
  • 2, 3, 1
  • 1, 3, 2
  • 2, 1, 3

Quiz 6: Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 4

Remember! You need to record your participation to pass this assessment item.

Did you contribute at least two posts to the discussion board for this module?

Be honest . . . 🙂

  • Yes, I did.
  • No, I didn’t.

Week 5: Communication Skills for University Success Coursera Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: 5.1 Practice Quiz

Q1. Dr Marie Stevenson makes two good recommendations about the use of PowerPoint in
presentations. What are they?

Check two options.

  • a. Give out printouts of any PowerPoint slides
    you use.
  • b. Don’t use too many PowerPoint slides.
  • c. Don’t just read out your PowerPoint slides.
  • d. Make your PowerPoint slides as colourful as
    possible.

Q2. Dr Stevenson also makes a number of points about use of voice in presentation.
Which of the following comments did she make?

1.
“Speak directly to your audience.”

2.
“Don’t speak too loud so people are forced to listen closely.”

3.
“Don’t speak too fast.”

4.
“Take pauses.”

Check one option.

  • a. 1,2
  • b. 2, 3
  • c. 3, 4
  • d. 1, 4

Q3. Dr Alyssa O’Brien suggests that there are two challenges facing students doing
presentations in academic contexts. What are they?

  • a. Determine the format and expectations of
    presentations in your academic field.
  • b. Find your own argument and present it with
    authority.
  • c. Summoning the confidence to present in public.
  • d. Having the technical knowledge to create
    amazing PowerPoint presentations.

Quiz 2: 5.2 Practice Quiz

Q1.Consider the following presentation assessment from a Linguistics unit entitled
‘Language and Power.’

Students will need to individually present
each week on the readings for that week. Each student will be allocated a week
in which to present. The presentations will last for 15 minutes, with the final
5 minutes allocated to discussion of the topic amongst the tutorial group.
Student will be required to quickly present the main points of the readings,
find similarities and differences, and try to apply the ideas to real world
language situations. They will also need to lead the discussion in the final 5
minutes of the presentation.

What
is the main purpose of this presentation?

Check one option.

  • a. To entertain the audience
  • b. To practice spoken communication skills
  • c. To display subject knowledge and critical
    thinking skills
  • d. To persuade the audience

Q2. Consider the following presentation assessment from a Linguistics unit entitled
‘Language and Power.’

Students will need to individually
present each week on the readings for that week. Each student will be allocated
a week in which to present. The presentations will last for 15 minutes, with
the final 5 minutes allocated to discussion of the topic amongst the tutorial
group. Student will be required to quickly present the main points of the
readings, find similarities and differences, and try to apply the ideas to real
world language situations. They will also need to lead the discussion in the
final 5 minutes of the presentation.

You
are going to make this presentation next week, and would like to show a video
of a short segment of classroom discussion. What are your three most important
considerations with regard to Place before you make your presentation?

Check
three options.

  • a. The seating arrangement in the room
  • b. Whether the projector is working.
  • c. Whether the sound is working.
  • d. Whether you can use PowerPoint or not.
  • e. Whether you can play the video file of the
    classroom discussion on the computer in the room.

Q3. Which of the following are possible ways to organise the body of your presentation,
according to lesson 5.2b?

Check three options.

  • a. Chronological order
  • b. Specific to General
  • c. Natural structure
  • d. Residues approach/comparing points of view
  • e. General to Specific
  • f. Resources approach

Quiz 3: 5.3 Practice Quiz

Q1. Consider the following slide from a presentation on crop rotation in the 18th
century.

What problems does
it have in terms of readability of text?

Check three options.

  • a. There is not enough text.
  • b. The heading is too large.
  • c. The body text is too small.
  • d. There are too many fonts being used on the
    slide.
  • e. There is too much text on the slide.
  • f. There are some misspelled words.

Q2. Consider the following slide from a presentation on crop rotation in the 18th
century.

What
problems does it have in terms of use of images?

Check two options.

  • a. The images are too small.
  • b. The images need more contrast to stand out.
  • c. The pictures are not related to the text.
  • d. There is not enough space around the images.

Q3. What is signposting language?

Check one option.

  • a. Language found on signs around university.
  • b. Language used to preview a presentation in
    the introduction.
  • c. Directions on your script about how to use
    body language in your presentation.
  • d. Words and phrases designed to explicitly
    signal the structure of a presentation to an audience.

Quiz 4: 5.4 Practice Quiz

Q1. What tips does lesson 5.4a give for engaging your audience?

Check three options.

  • a. Move around the room a lot during your
    presentation to raise the energy levels.
  • b. Apologise if you make any errors.
  • c. Make sure you minimise your accent, if you
    have one.
  • d. Make eye contact with your audience.
  • e. Don’t turn your back on the audience.
  • f. Model the engagement you want from your
    audience.

Q2. Which of the following are techniques
suggested in lesson 5.4b for engaging your audience at the beginning of your
presentation?

Check two options.

  • a. Tell a joke.
  • b. Have a short quiz.
  • c. Put up a discussion question.
  • d. Talk about how you got to the presentation.

Q3. It’s the end of the presentation, and
someone had asked you a difficult question. What do you do?

Check two options.

  • a. Ask them to repeat the question to buy more
    time.
  • b. Move on to the next question without
    answering it.
  • c. Throw the question back to the audience to
    answer.
  • d. Ask them to be quiet for a minute or two while
    you look up the answer on your phone.

Quiz 5: Summative Quiz – Module 5

Q1. Consider the following presentation assessment from an undergraduate business unit of study outline.

Groups of 3-4 will design an online marketing campaign for the organisation of their choice. They will write a report addressed to the organisation’s marketing director, giving reasons for their choices. Groups will also present their campaign in the final lesson of the course. The presentation must be addressed to the company’s board of directors, and will need to ‘pitch’ their marketing strategy to the board, as well as giving reasons for their choices. The presentation will last for 10 minutes, with extra time at the end for questions.

Who is/are your audience/audiences for this presentation?

Check one option.

D. Imaginary board of directors

  • A. Students
  • B. Academics
  • A, B and D
  • A, B and C
  • A and B
  • B, C and D
  • B and C
  • C. Administrative staff

Q2. Consider the same presentation
assessment from an undergraduate business course unit of study outline.

Groups
of 3-4 will design an online marketing campaign for the organisation of their
choice. They will write a report addressed to the organisation’s marketing
director, giving reasons for their choices. Groups will also present their
campaign in the final lesson of the course. The presentation must be addressed
to the company’s board of directors, and will need to ‘pitch’ their marketing
strategy to the board, as well as giving reasons for their choices. The
presentation will last for 10 minutes, with extra time at the end for
questions.

What kind of research will students
need to do for the presentation?

Check one option.

  • A. None
  • B. Research into the organisation to which the
    presentation is addressed.
  • C. Research into the market demographics for the
    online marketing campaign.
  • Both B and C.

Q3. Consider the same presentation assessment from an undergraduate business course unit of study outline.

Groups of 3-4 will design an online marketing campaign for the organisation of their choice. They will write a report addressed to the organisation’s marketing director, giving reasons for their choices. Groups will also present their campaign in the final lesson of the course. The presentation must be addressed to the company’s board of directors, and will need to ‘pitch’ their marketing strategy to the board, as well as giving reasons for their choices. The presentation will last for 10 minutes, with extra time at the end for questions.

What will be the best structure for the body of this presentation?

  • Chronological structure.
  • General to Specific.
  • Residues approach.
  • Narrative structure.

Q4. Consider the same presentation assessment from an undergraduate business course unit of study outline.

Groups
of 3-4 will design an online marketing campaign for the organisation of their
choice. They will write a report addressed to the organisation’s marketing
director, giving reasons for their choices. Groups will also present their
campaign in the final lesson of the course. The presentation must be addressed
to the company’s board of directors, and will need to ‘pitch’ their marketing
strategy to the board, as well as giving reasons for their choices. The
presentation will last for 10 minutes, with extra time at the end for
questions.

Your group member would like to give
the following introduction to the talk.

‘Good
afternoon everyone. Today’s presentation will outline our proposed online
marketing plan for XYZ industries. Our presentation will firstly give the theoretical
background for our proposed plan. We will then present information on the
demographics we will be targeting, and following that the channels and
schedules for the online market plan. We would ask you to please save any
questions until the end.’

What do you think of the introduction?

  • It’s fine.
  • It’s missing a thesis statement.
  • It’s missing a definition of key terms.
  • It’s missing an outline of what each presenter
    will be talking about.

Q5. Consider the same presentation assessment from an undergraduate business course unit of study outline.

Groups
of 3-4 will design an online marketing campaign for the organisation of their
choice. They will write a report addressed to the organisation’s marketing
director, giving reasons for their choices. Groups will also present their
campaign in the final lesson of the course. The presentation must be addressed
to the company’s board of directors, and will need to ‘pitch’ their marketing
strategy to the board, as well as giving reasons for their choices. The
presentation will last for 10 minutes, with extra time at the end for
questions.

Here is an information graphic one of
your group members wants to present in the presentation.

What do you think of this information
graphic?

Check
one option.

  • The information should be presented as a line
    graph.
  • It’s fine.
  • The columns should be different colours.
  • The information should be presented as a pie chart

Q6. Consider the same presentation assessment from an undergraduate business course unit of study outline.

Groups
of 3-4 will design an online marketing campaign for the organisation of their
choice. They will write a report addressed to the organisation’s marketing
director, giving reasons for their choices. Groups will also present their
campaign in the final lesson of the course. The presentation must be addressed
to the company’s board of directors, and will need to ‘pitch’ their marketing
strategy to the board, as well as giving reasons for their choices. The
presentation will last for 10 minutes, with extra time at the end for questions.

One of your group members would like to
write out the full script for the presentation. What are two of the drawbacks
with this approach?

Check
two options.

  • It might result in you missing points or
    rambling.
  • It might lead to your presentation being more unstructured.
  • Reading off a piece of paper will cause your
    audience to disengage.
  • It will limit your ability to adapt the
    presentation to different situations.

Q7. Consider the same presentation assessment from an undergraduate business course unit of study outline.

Groups
of 3-4 will design an online marketing campaign for the organisation of their
choice. They will write a report addressed to the organisation’s marketing
director, giving reasons for their choices. Groups will also present their
campaign in the final lesson of the course. The presentation must be addressed
to the company’s board of directors, and will need to ‘pitch’ their marketing
strategy to the board, as well as giving reasons for their choices. The
presentation will last for 10 minutes, with extra time at the end for
questions.

You have started delivering your
presentation but you have noticed that the audience seem disengaged, and are
not paying attention. What do you do?

Check
two options.

  • Smile and stand taller.
  • Make eye contact.
  • Start talking faster.
  • Tell a joke.
  • Think of a snappy ‘hook’ to get their attention.

Q8. Consider the same presentation assessment from an undergraduate business course unit of study outline.

Groups
of 3-4 will design an online marketing campaign for the organisation of their
choice. They will write a report addressed to the organisation’s marketing
director, giving reasons for their choices. Groups will also present their
campaign in the final lesson of the course. The presentation must be addressed
to the company’s board of directors, and will need to ‘pitch’ their marketing
strategy to the board, as well as giving reasons for their choices. The
presentation will last for 10 minutes, with extra time at the end for questions.

Someone asks a difficult question at
the end, criticising part of your online marketing campaign aimed at students
and saying that students use different kinds of online media. What is a
suitable reply?

Check
two options.

  • “That’s an interesting point. What are other
    people’s views? Do you think, as students, you would respond to this campaign?”
  • “That’s a valid point. However according to
    Smith and Jones (2015) students …”
  • “Well, we did a lot of research on this so I
    think our point is correct.”
  • “No, you’re wrong. Our research proves our position is correct.”

Quiz 6: Discussion Board Self Assessment – Module 5

Q1. Remember! You need to record your participation to pass this assessment item.

Did you contribute at least two posts to the discussion board for this module?

Be honest . . . 🙂

  • Yes, I did.
  • No, I didn’t.
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